Lecture 5 - Central Dogma of Biology Be able to describe...

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Central Dogma of Biology Be able to describe the process of DNA replication. Understand the role played by DNA polymerases I and III, the role of primase, helicase, topoisomerases, ligase and single-strand binding proteins. Understand the central dogma of biology. Understand the roles of transcription and translation in this central dogma. Understand the process of transcription and why this process occurs. Be able to describe the steps and enzymes involved in this process. Understand the processes of post- transcriptional modification that occur in the eukaryotic cell.
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Central Dogma of Biology Understand the process of translation and why this process occurs. Be able to describe the steps, enzymes and other materials involved in this process. Understand the idea of the codon. Know what is meant by the term genetic code. Given a DNA sequence, be able to determine the RNA sequence that would be transcribed. Given the genetic code, be able to translate a sequence of RNA into a sequence of amino acids.
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Central Dogma of Biolgy
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Central Dogma of Biology
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DNA Polymer of deoxyribonucleotides Found in then nucleus of eukaryotic cells; in the cytoplasm of prokaryotic cells Plays a central role in heredity and development Genes = DNA sequence that is the information for proteins
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Deoxyribonucleotide Structure Sugar: Deoxyribose Phosphate Group Nitrogenous Base: Purine or Pyrimidine
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DNA Synthesis Synthesized 5’ to 3’ (refers to carbons in the deoxyribose sugar) Attached to base Attached to phosphate group
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DNA Synthesis Phosphodiester bond
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DNA Structure Double stranded (2 strands) helix Antiparallel 5’───────3’ 3’───────5’ Complementary strands
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DNA Strands Are Held Together By Hydrogen Bonds Between Complimentary Base Pairs G always pairs with C A always pairs with T G:C pairs are stronger than A:T pairs
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Genomes Varicella zoster virus (chickenpox) 125,000 basepairs 75 1 linear Escherichia coli O157:H7 5.5 million basepairs
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2009 for the course BIOT 101 taught by Professor Don during the Fall '09 term at Ivy Tech Community College.

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Lecture 5 - Central Dogma of Biology Be able to describe...

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