Lecture Handout 3 - BIOT 101 Lecture Handout 3 Review of...

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BIOT 101 Lecture Handout 3 Review of Macromolecules Vocabulary alpha helix ( α -helix) amino acids amino acyl-tRNA aminoacyl tRNA synthases anticodon beta sheet ( β -sheet) branch Carbohydrates cDNA Lipids complimentary base pairs dehydration synthesis Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) deoxyribonucleotides disulfide bond double helix enzymes enzymes fatty acids fibrous proteins genes Genomic DNA globular proteins glycerol glycolipids glycoproteins Glycosidic bond head group hexoses hydrolysis ligands macromolecules Messenger RNA (mRNA) monomers pentoses peptide bond Phosophodiester bond phosphocholine Phospholipids amphipathic polar heads polymers polypeptide primary stucture Proteins pyrimidines Quaternary structure ribonucleic acid (RNA) ribonucleic acids (RNA) ribose ribosomal RNA (rRNA) secondary structure sequence Tertiary structure tetroses Transfer RNA (tRNA) Triglycerides trioses unit molecules Objectives Understand what the biological macromolecules are and how the polymeric molecules are formed and broken down. Be able to recognize the general structure of a carbohydrate and the various forms of monosaccharides that exists. Understand the roles of the polysaccharide in living systems. Understand what is meant by the term “branching” with regard to polysaccharide structure. Be able to recognize the general structure of an amino acid and understand the significance of the differing ability of amino acids to interact with water. Be able to describe the various levels of structure that proteins have and how this structure impacts the functionality of the protein. Understand the physical conditions that can impact the ability of proteins to properly take on their proper secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure. Be able to recognize the symbols commonly used to denote the various forms of secondary structure. Be able to recognize the general structure of a nucleotide and understand the difference between ribonucleotides and deoxyribonucleotides. Understand the nature of complementary base pairing and the physical conditions that will impact complementary base pairing. Be able to describe the different functional roles that RNA plays. When manipulating DNA, understand the difference between genomic DNA and cDNA. Be able to recognize the general structure of a phospholipid and describe the role that phospholipids play in living systems. I. Large molecules that are made by and then make of living organisms are often large and are thus referred to as macromolecules (macro- means large). Macromolecules include polysaccharides, 1
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BIOT 101 Lecture Handout 3 Review of Macromolecules polypeptides, nucleic acids and lipids. The polysaccharides, polypeptides and nucleic acids are polymers . A polymer is a large molecule formed from repeating unit molecules (monomers ) covalently bound together. A.
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2009 for the course BIOT 101 taught by Professor Don during the Fall '09 term at Ivy Tech Community College.

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Lecture Handout 3 - BIOT 101 Lecture Handout 3 Review of...

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