SB_Chem6A_08_Lecture16

SB_Chem6A_08_Lecture16 - Final Exam Review (A/E00): TBA...

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Chemistry 6A Final Exam Review (A/E00): TBA Bonus Exercise: A Course Concept Map Details to follow in an e-mail and/or online Due: Tuesday, December 9, before Final Exam (A00 Section) Due: Friday, December 12, before Final Exam (E00 Section) 1
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Chemistry 6A Consider the phosphorus and chlorine molecules in the adjacent reaction chamber. These two elements react to form phosphorus trichloride. Which choice represents the chamber after the reaction? (a) (c) (b) (d) (e) No representation is correct. 2
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Chemistry 6A 3 What are the characteristics of gases and the four properties that determine their physical behavior? How do we understand and apply the simple gas laws and the ideal gas equation? How does effusion and diffusion relate to the kinetic-molecular theory of gases?
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Chemistry 6A 4 Most substances that are gases at room temperature consist of relatively small molecules: Elements: He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rd, H 2 , N 2 , O 2 , F 2 , Cl 2 Binary inorganic compounds: CO 2 Organic compounds: CH 4 , CH 3 CH 3 , CH 3 CH 2 CH 3 The observation that gases have a high compressibility and a high thermal expansivity , relative to liquids and solids, suggests that gas particles are widely separated and in ceaseless random motion Most gases behave similarly at low pressure and high temperature . From macroscopically measurable properties – n, P, V, and T - is derived a general equation of state , which relates all four quantities: the Ideal Gas Law
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Chemistry 6A 5 A gas is a large collection of particles (atoms or molecules) moving at random throughout a volume that is primarily empty space. Collisions of particles with the walls of the container walls exert a force per unit area that we perceive as gas pressure, P . Unit Name Definition or Equivalency Pascal (Pa) * SI unit 1.00 N m -2 (1.00 kg m -1 s -2 ) Standard Atmosphere (atm) 101,325 Pa Bar (bar) 100,000 Pa Torr (torr) 1/760 atm Millimeter Hg at 273 K (mm Hg) 1/760 atm Pounds per inches 2 (psi) 1/14.69595 atm P = Force / Area
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Chemistry 6A 6 A barometer is used to measure atmospheric pressure by determining the height of a liquid (*typically Hg) column supported in a sealed glass tube. Volume of Liquid = height x area = ( hA ) Mass of liquid = density x volume = d (hA) Force = mass x acceleration = ( dhA ) x g Where g = acceleration of gravity The downward pressure of the Hg column is exactly balanced by the external atmospheric pressure on the liquid Hg in the dish: Pressure = F / A = (dhAg) / A = dh g
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Chemistry 6A 7 A barometer is used to measure atmospheric pressure by determining the height of a liquid (*typically Hg) column supported in a sealed glass tube. Pressure = F / A = dh g
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Chemistry 6A 8 Qu. 4.5 . What is the height of a column of water that exerts the same pressure as a column of mercury 76.0 cm high? d
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SB_Chem6A_08_Lecture16 - Final Exam Review (A/E00): TBA...

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