SB_Chem6A_08_Lecture17

SB_Chem6A_08_Lecture17 - Chemistry 6A Final Exam Review...

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Unformatted text preview: Chemistry 6A Final Exam Review (A00): * Sat. 6 th , 12 -2 PM, Sun 7 th , 2-3 PM E-mail me before Friday, 9 PM with questions New WebCT Postings Bonus Exercise: A Course Concept Map (Due Dec. 9) Final Exam Data Final Exam: 8-11 AM 45-50 Multiple-choice Cumulative; Approx. 40% E1, 40% E2, 20% new material How to prepare? Review and integrate information from learning goals, lecture notes/readings, homework assignments, and tests /quizzes. 1 Chemistry 6A Final Exam Review (E00): Sun 7 th , 2-4 PM, Tues. 9 th , 7-9 PM E-mail me before Monday, 9 PM with questions New WebCT Postings Bonus Exercise: A Course Concept Map (Due Dec. 12) Final Exam Data Final Exam: 7-10 PM, York 2722 45-50 Multiple-choice Cumulative; Approx. 40% E1, 40% E2, 20% new material How to prepare? Review and integrate information from learning goals, lecture notes/readings, homework assignments, and tests /quizzes. 2 Chemistry 6A Assuming ideal gas behavior, which of the following gases would have the lowest density at standard temperature and pressure (STP)? (a) SF 6 (b) CF 2 Cl 2 (c) CO 2 (d) N 2 (e) Kr 3 Chemistry 6A 4 How do we understand and apply the relationships inherent in the kinetic-molecular theory of gases: root-mean-square speed, temperature, molar mass; and, average kinetic energy and Kelvin temperature. How do we account for non-ideality of gases? How do intermolecular forces arise? What are the types of forces and their strengths? Chemistry 6A 1 % of a measured amount of Ar(g) escapes through a tiny hole in 77.3 s. 1% of the same amount of an unknown gas escapes under the same conditions in 97.6 s. What is the molar mass of the unknown gas? 5 Chemistry 6A 1. A gas is comprised of a collection of small particles (atoms, ions or molecules) in constant, random, straight-line motion with a distribution of speeds. 2. Relative to their diameters, gas particles are separated by great distances, so that a gas is mostly empty space. 3. Gas particles do not influence one another, except during collisions. 4. Gas particles collide elastically with one another and the walls of the container; the total energy remains constant (at constant T), though particles may gain or lose energy as a result of collisions. 6 Chemistry 6A 7 Kinetic energy ( E K ) of a single molecule = mv 2 This expression produces a value in (kg*m 2 ) / s 2 = joules (J) Ideal gas law : PV = nRT Multiplication of n , R (in units of J / (K*mol)) and T also gives a value with the unit of energy: J. Therefore, the right side of the Ideal Gas equation can be thought of as an indication of the total E K of all the particles in a sample of gas....
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2009 for the course CHEM CHEM 6A taught by Professor Czarkowski during the Fall '07 term at UCSD.

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SB_Chem6A_08_Lecture17 - Chemistry 6A Final Exam Review...

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