comd 2 - Chapter 11 Pragmatic s Pragmaticsisthestudyof

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Chapter 11 Pragmatic s
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Pragmatics is the study of  'invisible' meaning , example: 2
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Context We rely on linguistic context to figure out the meaning when there is less situational and physical context. Linguistic context is also known as co-text. Co-text: the other words used in a phases or sentence that help determine the meaning of the word in a question.
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Context “I’m going to the bank to cash a check.” How does the context help you figure out the meaning?
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Deictic expression: The word  whose exact meaning is  revealed in given physical  contexts , example: here, this,  now, she. 5
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Free Beer Tomorrow!!! When, exactly, is tomorrow?
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Deictic expressions: 1. Personal deixis: me, you, him,  them 2. Spatial deixis: there, yonder,  here. 3. Temporal deixis: then, today 7
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Reference  is the act by which a  speaker uses language to  enable a listener to identify  something. 8
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Reference Inference: the listener’s use of additional information to connect what is said to what must be meant. Can I see your Yule?
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Reference People often misuse the terms “imply” and “infer”. The speaker or writer “implies” and the listener “infers”. If you write a response in reaction to an article written in the newspaper, say “the writer implies…. .”, not “the writer infers…”.
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An inference  is any additional  information used by the  listener to connect what is said  to what must be meant. 11
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Referential relationship: Referential relationship: Tom  bought a book . It  was  interesting. book: antecedent It: anaphora (ie deictic  expression) 12
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Antecedents are the words that pronouns refer back to. “Allie likes her coach, she has learned a
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2009 for the course COMD 2050 taught by Professor Collins during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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comd 2 - Chapter 11 Pragmatic s Pragmaticsisthestudyof

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