Intro1_M06_create_solid_model

Intro1_M06_create_solid_model - Creating the Solid Model...

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Unformatted text preview: Creating the Solid Model Chapter 6 February 7, 2006 Inventory #002268 6-2 INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS - Part 1 Part 1 Part 1 Training Manual • The purpose of this chapter is to review some preliminary modeling considerations, discuss how to import one’s geometry into ANSYS, and finally introduce how to create one’s geometry using ANSYS native commands. Chapter 6 – Creating the Solid Model Overview February 7, 2006 Inventory #002268 6-3 INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS - Part 1 Part 1 Part 1 Training Manual • Many modeling decisions must be made before building an analysis model: – How much detail should be included? – Does symmetry apply? – Will the model contain stress singularities? Chapter 6 – Creating the Solid Model A. What to model? February 7, 2006 Inventory #002268 6-4 INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS - Part 1 Part 1 Part 1 Training Manual Details • Small details that are unimportant to the analysis should not be included in the analysis model. You can suppress such features before sending a model to ANSYS from a CAD system. • For some structures, however, "small" details such as fillets or holes can be locations of maximum stress and might be quite important, depending on your analysis objectives. Chapter 6 – A. What to Model …What to model? February 7, 2006 Inventory #002268 6-5 INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS - Part 1 Part 1 Part 1 Training Manual Symmetry • Many structures are symmetric in some form and allow only a representative portion or cross-section to be modeled. • The main advantages of using a symmetric model are: – It is generally easier to create the model. – It allows you to make a finer, more detailed model and thereby obtain better results than would have been possible with the full model. Chapter 6 – A. What to Model …What to model? February 7, 2006 Inventory #002268 6-6 INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS - Part 1 Part 1 Part 1 Training Manual • To take advantage of symmetry, all of the following must be symmetric: – Geometry – Material properties – Loading conditions • There are different types of symmetry: – Axisymmetry – Rotational – Planar or reflective – Repetitive or translational Chapter 6 – A. What to Model …What to model? February 7, 2006 Inventory #002268 6-7 INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS INTRODUCTION TO ANSYS - Part 1 Part 1 Part 1 Training Manual Axisymmetry • Symmetry about a central axis, such as in light bulbs, straight pipes, cones, circular plates, and domes. • Plane of symmetry is the cross-section anywhere around the structure. Thus you are using a single 2-D “slice” to represent 360 ° — a real savings in model size!...
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This note was uploaded on 12/10/2009 for the course ME master taught by Professor Mon during the Spring '09 term at Hanyang University.

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Intro1_M06_create_solid_model - Creating the Solid Model...

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