Solutions-Chapter5 - CHAPTER 5 HOW TO VALUE STOCKS AND...

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Unformatted text preview: CHAPTER 5 HOW TO VALUE STOCKS AND BONDS Answers to Concepts Review and Critical Thinking Questions 1. Bond issuers look at outstanding bonds of similar maturity and risk. The yields on such bonds are used to establish the coupon rate necessary for a particular issue to initially sell for par value. Bond issuers also simply ask potential purchasers what coupon rate would be necessary to attract them. The coupon rate is fixed and simply determines what the bonds coupon payments will be. The required return is what investors actually demand on the issue, and it will fluctuate through time. The coupon rate and required return are equal only if the bond sells exactly at par. 2. Lack of transparency means that a buyer or seller cant see recent transactions, so it is much harder to determine what the best price is at any point in time. 3. The value of any investment depends on the present value of its cash flows; i.e., what investors will actually receive. The cash flows from a share of stock are the dividends. 4. Investors believe the company will eventually start paying dividends (or be sold to another company). 5. In general, companies that need the cash will often forgo dividends since dividends are a cash expense. Young, growing companies with profitable investment opportunities are one example; another example is a company in financial distress. This question is examined in depth in a later chapter. 6. The general method for valuing a share of stock is to find the present value of all expected future dividends. The dividend growth model presented in the text is only valid (i) if dividends are expected to occur forever; that is, the stock provides dividends in perpetuity, and (ii) if a constant growth rate of dividends occurs forever. A violation of the first assumption might be a company that is expected to cease operations and dissolve itself some finite number of years from now. The stock of such a company would be valued by applying the general method of valuation explained in this chapter. A violation of the second assumption might be a start-up firm that isnt currently paying any dividends, but is expected to eventually start making dividend payments some number of years from now. This stock would also be valued by the general dividend valuation method explained in this chapter. 7. The common stock probably has a higher price because the dividend can grow, whereas it is fixed on the preferred. However, the preferred is less risky because of the dividend and liquidation preference, so it is possible the preferred could be worth more, depending on the circumstances. 8. Yes. If the dividend grows at a steady rate, so does the stock price. In other words, the dividend growth rate and the capital gains yield are the same. 9. The three factors are: 1) The companys future growth opportunities. 2) The companys level of risk, which determines the interest rate used to discount cash flows. 3) The accounting method used....
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This note was uploaded on 12/10/2009 for the course BUS 311 taught by Professor Fas during the Spring '09 term at American University in Bulgaria.

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Solutions-Chapter5 - CHAPTER 5 HOW TO VALUE STOCKS AND...

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