LW_BCH4122_Lecture3_2009 edit

LW_BCH4122_Lecture3_2009 edit - Use of macromolecules to...

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Many different types of stem cells are found in very small populations in the human body (for instance 1 in 100,000 cells in blood). Stem cells look just like any other cells under a microscope in the tissue where they reside. Identification of these rare type of cells (a process like to find a needle in a haystack) is based on stem cell "markers." These markers are macromolecules located either inside stem cells or on cell surface. Use of macromolecules to identify and isolate adult stem cells
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Characterize adult stem cell based on surface markers In vivo and in vitro analyses of single adult stem cells Select and purify macromolecules that mark adult stem cells Generate specific antibodies against a given specific macromolecules Label the antibodies with fluorescent probe/enzyme/biotin Purify adult stem cells according to the expression of specific macromolecules that are recognized by specific antibodies
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Intra-cellular macromolecule can be stained together with a cell surface macromolecule
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Image source: http://stemcells.nih.gov/StaticResources/info/scireport/images/figuree2.jpg Based on specific cell surface markers (macromolecules), rare stem cells can be found and separated from majority mature cells by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) - +
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This note was uploaded on 12/11/2009 for the course BCH bch4122 taught by Professor Wang during the Spring '09 term at University of Ottawa.

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LW_BCH4122_Lecture3_2009 edit - Use of macromolecules to...

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