(Ebook) - Survival - Learn How To Hide From Airborne Infared Detection Devices, Snipers Guide

(Ebook) - Survival - Learn How To Hide From Airborne Infared Detection Devices, Snipers Guide

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pretty gloomy postings about IR detection. As an electrical utility thermographer, I might shed some light (pun intended) on the subject. To qualify this, I am using the latest (I think) commercially available FLIR product, and am a level II thermographer, (total formal IR training: 2 weeks-experience using IR equipment: about 5 years.) I believe I am at least familiar with IR. Granted, my life is not depending on avoiding IR detection, so I guess I can have my opinions pretty safely. These are my observations about IR imagers using civilian equipment and are. . "just my opinion". It's up to you and yours to check them out in your world. This is WAY brief, believe it or not. Anyone interested can email for more. This is about THERMAL detection, not IR illuminating sources for "starlight" scopes. IR is not Xray, Hollywood bedamned-it cannot detect a differential heat image through common solid materials, plastic film (black or otherwise) being an exception. However, a good imager system can see through holes in a masking material ("IR masking" camo net). And if you are inside a dumpster, bodyheating the bad guy's side, he can "see" the hot spot on the dumpster's outside. But if you are not leaning (heating) against that side, he can't "see you". Your body heat will not be detected behind most readily available unholed blinding materials if you are not differentially warming/cooling those materials or allowing your own IR to reflect off of something behind/over you. BUT, if the shielding materials are alien to the surroundings, the material itself will probably stand out. See below. Glass will not allow your THERMAL image to transmit (pass) through; same as the dumpster scenario. The lenses of IR imagers are made of exotic nonglass materials because of this. Every piece (cluster) of matter, including gasses, emits IR if it is above Absolute Zero (minus 459.69 degrees F). The warmer a body gets, the more IR it will emit. Eventually it will enter the visible spectrum as it gets "red hot". The surface of a piece of matter is where IR is emitted. Altering an object's surface will alter the rate at which IR is emitted. Stoveblack is a classic example. Materials physically different from each other will likely emit IR at different rates. BUT the differences may be very slight. IR imaging (read DETECTION) depends upon two objects having one or more differences in Temperature, Emissivity/Reflectivity, and Absorption of the compared objects. For this
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application, we can forget about Absorption, and you should all understand Temperature. Now, E + R = 100%, thus the more emissive a surface is, the less reflective. If two dissimilar objects are at the same temperature, a high E will "look" hotter to an IR imager than a low E, thus forming an image. Objects with different Temperatures and the right E's could "look" the same, thus forming NO image. Two objects with similar temperatures and similar emissivities will present an unclear,
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2009 for the course ABC 123 taught by Professor Yah during the Spring '09 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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(Ebook) - Survival - Learn How To Hide From Airborne Infared Detection Devices, Snipers Guide

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