conditioning principles

conditioning principles - Training and Conditioning...

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Training and Conditioning Techniques
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Cross Training Training for a particular sport that involves substitution of alternative activities that have some carryover value to that sport. Swimmer trains using jogging maintain levels of cardiorespiratory conditioning
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Principles of Conditioning Warm-up and Cool down Motivation Overload Consistency Progression Intensity Specificity
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Principles of Conditioning Individuality Minimize Stress Safety
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Physiology of Warming Up Preparing the body physiologically and psychologically for physical performance. Used as a preventative measure Believed the proper warm-up will prevent strains and the tearing of muscle fibers from their tendinous attachments.
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Physiology of Warming Up Most frequently the antagonist muscles are torn. Their inability to relax rapidly, plus the great contractile forces of the agonist muscles added to the momentum of the moving part, subject the antagonists to sudden severe strain that can result in tearing of the fibers themselves as well as their tendinous attachments.
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Physiology of Warming Up Purpose: raise both the general body temperature and the deep muscle temperatures. Reduces the possibility of muscle tears and ligamentous sprains and helps to prevent muscle soreness. For each degree of internal temperature rise, there is a
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course KNES 200 taught by Professor Gil-aviso during the Spring '08 term at CSU Fullerton.

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conditioning principles - Training and Conditioning...

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