Acute and Emergency Care

Acute and Emergency Care - Acute and Emergency Care KNES...

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Unformatted text preview: Acute and Emergency Care KNES 200: Introduction to Athletic Training • When injuries occur, while generally not life-threatening, they require prompt care • Emergencies are unexpected occurrences that require immediate attention – time is a factor • Mistakes in initial injury management can prolong the length of time required for rehabilitation or cause life-threatening situations to arise Emergency Action Plan • Primary concern is maintaining cardiovascular and CNS functioning • Key to emergency aid is the initial evaluation of the injured athlete • Members of sports medicine team must at all times act reasonably and prudently • Must have a prearranged plan that can be implemented on a moments notice • Issues plan should address – Separate plans should be developed for each facility • Outline personnel and role • Identify necessary equipment – Established equipment and helmet removal policies and procedures – Availability of phones and access to 911 – Athletic trainer should be familiar with community based emergency health care delivery plan • Be aware of communication, transportation, treatment policies – Community based care (continued) • Individual calling medical personnel must relay the following: 1) type of emergency 2) suspected injury 3) present condition 4) current assistance 5) location of phone being used and 6) location of emergency – Keys to gates/locks must be easily accessible – Key facility and school administrators must be aware of emergency action plans and be aware of specific roles – Individual should be assigned to accompany athlete to hospital Cooperation between Emergency Care Providers • Cooperation and professionalism is a must – Athletic trainer generally first to arrive on scene of emergency, has more training and experience transporting athlete than physician – EMT has final say in transportation, athletic trainer assumes assistive role • To avoid problems, all individuals involved in plan should practice to familiarize themselves with all procedures (including equipment management) Parent Notification • When athlete is a minor, ATC should try to obtain consent from parent prior to emergency treatment • Consent indicates that parent is aware of situation, is aware of what the ATC wants to do, and parental permission is granted to treat specific condition • When unobtainable, predetermined wishes of parent (provided at start of school year) are enacted • With no informed consent, consent implied on part of athlete to save athlete’s life Principles of On-the-Field Injury Assessment • Appropriate acute care cannot be provided without a systematic assessment occurring on the playing field first • On-field assessment – Determine nature of injury – Provides information regarding direction of treatment – Divided into primary and secondary survey • Primary survey – Performed initially to establish presence of life-...
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course KNES 200 taught by Professor Gil-aviso during the Spring '08 term at CSU Fullerton.

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Acute and Emergency Care - Acute and Emergency Care KNES...

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