interpers.ec - Romantic Relationships 1 Running head:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Romantic Relationships 1 Running head: ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS Happiness, Health, and Sex: Stress in Romantic Relationships Kevin Chang Rutgers University
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Romantic Relationships 2 Abstract The focus for this literature review is to amass, evaluate, and articulate, through research, the substantially the proven effects that stress has on romantic relationships. Stress shows to have a direct causation on the health of members in a relationship, proving that any nonverbal, verbal, and support-based expression of affection predicts will reduce or raise a person’s stress hormones depending whether the expression is positive or negative. Additionally, physical affection can positively increase a person’s happiness with the relationship as whole in itself. Lastly, it has been discovered through empirical tests that sexual desire in a relationship positively correlates with marital satisfaction.
Background image of page 2
Romantic Relationships 3 Happiness, Health, and Sex: Stress in Romantic Relationships Romantic relationships, regardless of effort invested, age of participants, or generation differences, is formidable. Communication between romantic pairs has always been different, but for the majority of the time the two people spent together, they are constantly giving each other positive energy. However, as referred to as “the golden-ratio,” most couples have a five to one ratio in which they have five positive interactions that make up for the one negative interaction- in interaction that can inevitably cause stress. Stress can produce egregious effects on the well- being of an individual and as a consequence result in a staggering of other areas of life. Literature Review The Effects on health As Floyd, K., and Riforgiate, S. (2008) put so aptly, affectionate communication from one’s spouse relationship is related to the hormonal stress and cortisol levels. Cortisol is a steroid
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/14/2009 for the course INTRO TO L 730:201 taught by Professor Professor during the Spring '09 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 6

interpers.ec - Romantic Relationships 1 Running head:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online