Lathe_Report_WS06

Lathe_Report_WS06 - 92% needs to have how forces and chip...

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92% needs to have how forces and chip thickness are related MAE 4500 Manufacturing Methods Laboratory Report: Lathe Machining Group Sean Binion Jess Chism Brent Haynam Travis Oser Chris Smoot Grant Wiegmann Winter Semester 2006
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2 A b s t r a c t Turning operations were performed on multiple specimens of both steel and aluminum round bar stock. The intended purpose of machining these samples was to obtain data for an analysis of the factors affecting the surface finish of machined materials. These factors include tool condition, material feed rate and tool radius. The analysis also examines the difference between ideal and actual surface roughness, resultant chip thickness ratios, and tool wear due to feed rates. From the results of the analysis, it can be shown that the primary controllable factors which govern the relative magnitude of surface finish are tool radius, feed rates, and tool condition. To enhance the surface finish of a work piece material, the feed rate should be relatively low, a large tool radius should be selected, and conditions should be set to maximize a specific tool condition life.
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3 Table of Contents 1. Introduction 2. Objectives 3. Experimental Setup & Procedure 4. Data & Results 5. Conclusions 6. References 7. Appendices
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4 1. Introduction The process of machining often involves turning operations as a means to reduce the outer diameter of work pieces or to provide a fine finish to work piece surfaces. Turning operations generally entail the use of an engine lathe to provide rotational motion to the work material while a cutting tool is fed into the work piece at a typically perpendicular angle at a specified rate. The turning process is affected by a myriad of operator specified and machine created variables. The operator specified affects include cutting speed (in the guise of the RPM settings), the feed rate of the cutting tool, the tool radius and tool type selected. Affects which are intrinsic to the machining operation are chatter (machine vibrations), cutting tool imprecision, work material defects, surface scratching due to chip formations, and the creation of built up edge (BUE) concentrations along the cutting tool face. Both the operator and machine dependent affects combine to influence the final surface finish of the working piece. The ideal surface roughness is considered to be the best surface finish possible and is a function of the feed rate and tool radius [1]. As such, there are two values which are of primary interest while performing the analysis of the surface roughness. These values are the ideal surface roughness and the actual surface roughness, which is a product of the aforementioned operator and machine variables. However, as all machining operations must balance work quality with production speed and cost, it is beneficial to examine more than the ideal and actual surface roughness attained in this machining process.
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This note was uploaded on 12/14/2009 for the course MAE 4500 taught by Professor El-gizawy during the Spring '06 term at Missouri (Mizzou).

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Lathe_Report_WS06 - 92% needs to have how forces and chip...

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