Holocaust.docx - Holocaust(To join the Nazis abomination or...

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Holocaust (To join the Nazis abomination or the resistance of the Holocaust)What would the Germans choice?In partial fulfillment on the requirements inSociety, Cultured and Family PlanningSubmitted by:Luminang, Villa Dean SiaganBSED-Mathematics
I.Introduction:‘Early in the morning of 1 June 1943, the names of those who were to depart for the east in the waiting freight train were read aloud in the deadly silence of the barracks. We tried to boost each other’s morale. We are heading for the east, probably Poland. Perhaps we will meet family members there and friends who have already left. We will have to work hard and will suffer great deprivation. The summers will be hot and the winters freezing cold. But our spirits are high. We will not allow anyone or anything to dampen our spirits. Of course, none of us knew exactly what was ahead of us. We had to make the best of it. We would do what we could to stay together and to survive the war. It was the only sensible thing you could say to each other in suchcircumstances. After our carriage had been packed with as many people as possible and the door locked from the outside with massive hooks, De Vries did a headcount: there were 62 of us, plus a pram. With all of our baggage, we were like herrings packed in a barrel. There was barely any room to stretch your legs. The first problem we tried to solve was that of deciding on the best position to make the journey, sitting or standing. There was no obvious answer that applied as a general rule. Some could sit as long as there were others who stood. The pram and the barrels also took up a lot of room. Even before the train left, the barrel was being put to use because many were unable to control their nerves. It was agreed that two women would take turns to hold up a coat when one of their fellow gender needed to use the barrel. Of course, the same applied for the men. As you can imagine, the stench in the carriage soon became unbearable.’(Jules Schelvis, survivor 1921) “Yet a part of you still believes you can fight and survive no matter what your mind knows. It's not so strange. Where there's still life, there's still hope. What happens is up to God.”(Louis Zamperini,2011)- It is not but to have hope with everything that is happening around you, having hope is like believing in humanity and that there is still good in people.The Holocaust was the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its collaborators. Holocaust is a word of Greek origin meaning "sacrifice by fire." The Nazis, who came to power in Germany in January 1933, believed that Germans were "racially superior" and that the Jews, deemed "inferior," were an alien threat to the so-called German racial community.

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