01-Pipettes-and-microscopes

01-Pipettes-and-microscopes - BSCI330 Cell biology and...

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BSCI330 – Cell biology and physiology Fall 2009 LAB MANUAL – Lab Exercise #1 Carpenter et al. 2009. BSCI330 Laboratory Manual. University of Maryland, College Park. 1 EXERCISE 1: PIPETTES AND MICROSCOPY Part of your lab notebook is to record predictions you pose about the experiments you will be doing in lab. Remember that a prediction is a statement of expected results (“We believe we will observe more protein in sample A than in sample B.”), based on some prior knowledge, observation or on a tentative explanation of a natural phenomenon (hypothesis). It is not a question (“Which sample will have more protein?”) or statement of what you want to study (“We would like to see if there is more protein under different conditions.”). The exercises in this lab period are not really “true” experiments, but more practice so you will be skilled at these techniques when you use them for experiments later in the semester. But, there are a few instances where you should be thinking ahead to the results you may see and thus formulating predictions. Those instances are emphasized within the text of this lab manual, as it is assumed that you will read the lab manual and complete the necessary parts of your lab notebook PRIOR to coming to lab. Review of Laboratory Technique From your previous experience in other biology courses, you should have been introduced to several important laboratory techniques. Although they should therefore already be familiar, we wish to review them briefly, as optimal success in many of the laboratory exercises this semester will depend upon their proper implementation. 1. Using the automatic pipette: Automatic pipettetes come in several sizes: S i z e Maximum Capacity P-10 10 μ l P-20 20 μ l P-100 100 μ l P-200 200 μ l P-1000 1000 μ l P-5000 5000 μ l (*Remember that 1000 μ l = 1ml) Nearly all biology research labs use automatic micropipettetes, but to be useful, the pipettes must be used properly. In addition, each automatic pipette costs several hundred dollars to purchase and further money to routinely calibrate. They must be treated gently to be of value in the lab. Therefore, this exercise will teach you how to properly use and care for the pipettes in the lab. Remember that the success of your lab depends upon the proper use of the lab equipment! The Gilson Pipetman offers two-step pushbutton operation with simple one-handed pipetteting. Step 1. Select the appropriate pipette. You should select the pipette that has a range close to the volume that you require. In other words, if you need to add 100 μ l to a solution, your best option is to use a P-100 pipette. Your pipetteting accuracy will suffer if you should instead use a P-10 micropipette 10 times to get 100 μ l, or try to use a P-1000 to load only 100 μ l.
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BSCI330 – Cell biology and physiology Fall 2009 LAB MANUAL – Lab Exercise #1 Carpenter et al. 2009. BSCI330 Laboratory Manual. University of Maryland, College Park. 2
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This note was uploaded on 12/15/2009 for the course BSCI 330 taught by Professor Payne during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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01-Pipettes-and-microscopes - BSCI330 Cell biology and...

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