Withdrawal in the Interactions of Violent and Nonviolent Couples

Withdrawal in the Interactions of Violent and Nonviolent Couples

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The Abstracts of the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Society for Australasian Social Psychologists 55 Intentional versus incidental stereotype activation and the automatic entrainment of attitudes [email protected] R esearch into the consequences of automatic stereotype activation has focussed on the means hy which a person's attitudes towards a target group (e.g., 'I feel negative towards African Americans) can hecome hyper- accessihle and thus influence thought and hehaviour. Comparatively little research however, has investigated whether stereotype activation also renders the perceived attitudes of the target group hyper-accessihle (e.g., 'African Americans feel negative ahout the Republican Party'). To investigate this possibility, stereotypes were primed using a two-alternative-forced-choice picture judgment task in which participants categorised photographs of stereotype 'neutral' people or of 'hippies', either hy attending to their stereotype group membership (intentional activation) or to the number of times each image had been presented (incidental activation). Participants then completed an osten- sihly unrelated attitude questionnaire tapping three distinct factors typifying the perceived attitudes of hippies. Results suggested that covert activation of the hippie stereotype in task one lead participants to express attitudes more similar to those attributed to hippies in task two. Moderating factors and the probable cognitive architecture of this 'attitudinal chameleon effect' will be discussed, and the talk will conclude with some meta-theoretical remarks regarding the role of non-conscious perception and automaticity in producing socially regulated cognition and behaviour. ^ Perceiving racism in a police encounter y^ (Ohio State University). [email protected] A ccusations of racism are social and political dynamite. Senator Trent Lott was recently forced to resign his position as majority leader of the United States Senate after his statements sympathetic to racial segregation ignited puhlic furore. Social and political institutions also must cope with public perceptions of racism. Many large metropolitan areas in the U.S. have witnessed puhlic unrest following violent encounters between white police officers and minor- ity suspects. While racism is universally condemned, disagreements persist in scholarly and lay circles about how to define and identify racist behaviour. The death of a minority suspect at the hands of a white officer will be seen as racist by some, but as justifiable by others. Our project uses an experiment to examine the diverging perceptions of such an incident. We are especially interested in the effect of opinion leadership on public impressions. When commu- nity leaders pass judgment on such an event, do those state- ments influence the perceptions of ordinary citizens? Our study showed participants a mock newspaper article describ-
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This note was uploaded on 12/16/2009 for the course COM 312 taught by Professor Jacobsen during the Spring '09 term at ASU.

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Withdrawal in the Interactions of Violent and Nonviolent Couples

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