JUS 441 Good Faith & the Exclusionary Rule Pearce.doc -...

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Running head: GOOD FAITH EXCEPTION & THE EXCLUSIONARY RULE1Good Faith Exception & the Exclusionary Rule Shannon PearceGrand Canyon University: JUS 44103/08/2020
GOOD FAITH EXCEPTION & THE EXCLUSIONARY RULE2Good Faith Exception & the Exclusionary RuleIn 1914, it was decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, that any evidence that was obtained through an illegal search and seizure would not be allowed to be used during a criminal trial. This was done in order to made sure that law enforcement officers were acting appropriately and to hopefully prevent unlawful searches and seizures. Because of this, police officers and other law enforcement organizations were forced to change their tactics and follow the new requirements.Exclusionary RuleAccording to Cornell Law, the exclusionary rule “prevents the government from using most evidence gathered in violation of the United States Constitution.” Meaning that, because of this rule, any evidence obtained during an illegal search and seizure is a violation of the fourth amendment and is inadmissible in a criminal trial. This rule was put into place to prevent law enforcement from not breaking their law or abusing their power by conducting illegal searches

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Term
Spring
Professor
CHRIS LOEFFLER
Tags
Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Cornell Law, Mapp v Ohio, good faith exception

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