Analysis Defined for students

Analysis Defined for students - Warmup#3...

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Warm-up #3 What is the purpose of learning  about analytical writing in high  school? How will it help you with your  future success?
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Click to edit Master subtitle style Analysis Defined Adapted by Alesia Williams from the  original by Natalie Bedell, Writing Cluster  Leader for Louisville Male High School 2008
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Some food for thought A 2004 survey of 120 major corporations  identified writing as a “threshold skill” 80% of those companies assess writing  during the hiring process 33% of college students say their writing  doesn’t measure up to expectations 38% of high school graduates in the  workplace say the same thing * statistics taken from “Improving Writing in Secondary Schools” by Barton & Klump
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If you have good analytical writing  skills you should be able to approach  any future writing task.  Our goal is  to ensure you are prepared to excel  in the next phase in your life:  college . What kind of writing will you do 
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Why is academic writing important? The vast majority of writing you will do in college will be  analytical/argumentative—Academic Purpose, Academic Audience,  Academic Tone, Academic Documentation You are not likely to write feature articles, brochures, or personal  narratives after high school  Requiring you to analyze the content in any class (through critical  reading and thinking) and make sense of it by writing about it will  benefit your understanding of that content Analytical writing improves analytical reading and vice versa We want you to leave us with the ability to look at data and make  sense of it—CRITICAL THINKING
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Analytical writing contains… A main idea, or  THESIS , that is relevant for  an intended reader (beyond the teacher). It  is not merely writing to demonstrate  knowledge. Numerous  REASONS  for the thesis Specific  EVIDENCE  from several sources to  support your main idea and reasons SYNTHESIS : Explanations throughout the 
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4 Types of Evidence Expert opinion Facts and statistics Anecdotes Personal experience (not appropriate in  academic writing)
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The KDE Defines Analysis Kentucky Writing Handbook Part II: Scoring Applying the Criteria to Written Analysis Pages 11a -11b pp. 19-20 in packet
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CONTENT:  Purpose/Audience demonstrates a student’s ability to narrow and focus a topic, issue, or  problem clearly identifies and defines controlling idea to break down (analyze)  the “how,” “why,” “to what extent,” or “to what degree” of the topic,  issue, or problem Demonstrates student choice and ownership Demonstrates student’s ability to analyze for a larger purpose—to 
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This note was uploaded on 12/16/2009 for the course IDK 23432 taught by Professor Mrhey during the Spring '09 term at E. Kentucky.

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Analysis Defined for students - Warmup#3...

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