Lecture 08 - Experiment 8 Thermochemistry CH 204 Fall 2008...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Experiment 8 Thermochemistry CH 204 Fall 2008 Dr. Brian Anderson
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Last week Dilutions - Backward and Forward Beer’s Law: A = ecl Determined Molecular Formula for Crystals
Background image of page 2
Thermochemistry The study of heat in chemical reactions. Heat is produced and consumed in chemical reactions in stoichiometric amounts, just like any other reactant or product.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Thermochem in CH204 We look at two different thermochemical situations: Calorimetry add something hot to something cold heat lost by the hot = heat gained by the cold Hess’s Law Forming chemical bonds releases energy. Breaking chemical bonds requires energy. Add up all the energies to get the heat of reaction, H rxn .
Background image of page 4
Calorimetry Calorimeter – a container that traps heat Put a known mass of water in the calorimeter, add something hot, and measure heat gain by the temperature increase of the water The calorimeter itself also heats up when something hot is added
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Accounting for heat energy The total amount of heat added is equal to the amount of heat absorbed by the water plus the amount of heat absorbed by the calorimeter: q added = q water + q calorimeter The amount of heat absorbed by the water is equal to the mass of the water times the change in temperature times its specific heat capacity: q water = m w × c w × ∆ T C The amount of heat absorbed by the calorimeter is equal to its heat capacity times the change in temperature: q cal = C cal × ∆ T C
Background image of page 6
Specific heat capacity The amount of heat it takes to raise 1 gram of a substance by 1 degree C Units are J/gK c subscript
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/17/2009 for the course CH 310 N taught by Professor Blocknack during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 28

Lecture 08 - Experiment 8 Thermochemistry CH 204 Fall 2008...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online