(ebook-pdf) - Mathematics - Differential Forms in Electroma

(ebook-pdf) - Mathematics - Differential Forms in Electroma...

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Unformatted text preview: Electromagnetics Richard H. Selfridge, David V. Arnold, and Karl F. Warnick Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 459 Clyde Building Brigham Young University Provo, UT 84602 July 30, 2001 We would appreciate your suggestions and corrections to this draft. Send email to warnick@ee.byu.edu. Website: www.ee.byu.edu/ee/forms/ (c) 1999 Chapter 1 ELECTROSTATICS 1.1 Introduction 1.1.1 Overview Many applications of electrical engineering require a knowledge of the behavior of voltages and currents in electronic devices and within conductors. In many other situations it is not enough to understand the behavior the voltages and currents in just the conductors and other components, but also the influence of the voltage and current on surrounding materials. In physics classes we learn that electric and magnetic fields extend beyond the electrical carriers within a device. In electrical and computer engineering the extension of the fields beyond electronic devices and wires can have both beneficial and deleterious effects. Without fields we would not have such modern conveniences as cell Figure 1.1 : Crosstalk between two telephone transmission lines. phones, television, or even the simplest computer memory chip. On the other hand, unwanted field interactions can cause reversible and irreversible degradation in almost all types of electrical engineering systems. A common example of this type of degradation is evident when a telephone signal on one line leaks over to an adjacent line. This annoying phenomenon is known as cross talk . The diagram in Fig. 1.1 shows that the field from one line extends into the other. In this chapter we examine some of the behavior of electric fields and electric flux. We use the flat panel display as a motivating example for this study. We have chosen the flat panel display as an illustrative example because it shows the ubiquitous nature of electromagnetics in current technology. Flat panel displays are expected to be the video display technology of the future for replacing the current bulky screens on laptop, television, and other applications. The most common flat panel displays are based on liquid crystal display (LCD) technology. Fig. 1.2 shows a representative cell of a flat panel LCD. Each cell or pixel has a liquid crystal material sandwiched between two transparent conducting plates as shown in Fig. 1.2. The LCD either passes light or blocks light depending on the voltage difference between the two plates. The difference in voltage affects the liquid crystal material by means of the electric field generated between the two plates. Each of the liquid crystal cells represents one of the more than 50,000 individual picture elements or pixels on the screen. Each cell is similar to the parallel plate capacitor studied in fundamental physics courses. The parallel plate structure is used throughout this section as a basis for our description of electric fields and electric fluxes....
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This note was uploaded on 12/17/2009 for the course PHYSICS 105 taught by Professor Tamerdoğan during the Spring '09 term at Middle East Technical University.

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(ebook-pdf) - Mathematics - Differential Forms in Electroma...

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