PopeNotes - (Pope) mock-epic heroic couplets social satire...

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Losing Your Hair in the Eighteenth Century Alexander Pope’s The Rape of the Lock The ‘long eighteenth century’ (1660-1800) Restoration (1660) The Enlightenment The ‘Age of Reason’ Neo-classicism The ‘Augustan Age’ Court; the ‘Town’ (=London); coffeehouses Business, Science, Journalism, Comedy, Satire, the Novel Restoration Theatre— Congreve, The Way of the World Wycherley, The Country Wife Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (1726) The Rape of the Lock
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Unformatted text preview: (Pope) mock-epic heroic couplets social satire admonishing? celebratory? conventional theory of satire: normative, corrective genre Is Popes satire corrective? Or does part of him admire (envy?) what he describes? In parodying Miltons epic, is he mocking it, or paying it a compliment? Heroic Couplet = two rhymed pentameter lines; one thought gracefully completed in two lines; balance; intelligence; reason; wit...
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PopeNotes - (Pope) mock-epic heroic couplets social satire...

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