Woolf Lecture Notes Day One-1

Woolf Lecture Notes Day One-1 - Woolf, Day One Modernism...

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Modernism confronted a problem: How to tell stories in an era that had ‘discovered’ consciousness—how isolated we are by virtue of our thoughts. Woolf would help solve that problem by arguing for the permeability and connectedness of our individual mental lives. Her narratives flow through many individuals’ minds. Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) critic and writer feminism psychology style Bloomsbury Group Mrs. Dalloway (1925) To the Lighthouse (1927) Orlando (1928) A Room of One’s Own (1929) Woolf’s predicament after 1922 ‘How to tell a story in the wake of Ulysses and The Waste Land ?’ “The scratching of pimples on the body of the bootboy at Claridges.” Woolf, on Ulysses , letter 24 April 1922 “He sang it & chanted it rhythmed it. It has great beauty & force of phrase: Woolf, diary entry of 23 June, 1922 “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” (1924) “we cannot hear her mother's voice, or Hilda’s voice; we can only hear Mr. Bennett's voice telling us facts about rents and freeholds and copyholds and
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This note was uploaded on 12/17/2009 for the course ENG English taught by Professor Bruster during the Spring '09 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Woolf Lecture Notes Day One-1 - Woolf, Day One Modernism...

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