0323 - 0323 Sectarianism and Intra-state Conflict

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0323 – Sectarianism and Intra-state Conflict Adeed Dawisha – Requiem for Arab Nationalism Intrinsically   linked   to   Egypt’s   defeat   was   Abel   Nasser’s   own   loss   of   charisma.  Charisma allowed him to assume the uncontested leadership of the Arab nationalist  march. The Six-Day War was the culmination of a string of setbacks and reversals  suffered by Nasser, beginning with Iraq’s refusal to join the UAR.  The gradual loss of imperialism as the target of Egypt’s Arab nationalism Western imperialism was still pervasive in Arab countries in the 1950s, bringing the  symbolic   power   and   emotional   resonance   of   anti-imperialism.   As   the   western  dominance waned in the region in the 1960s, Nasser tried to turn Arab nationalist  fury against reactionary Arab countries only to find his influence was weakening.  Egypt’s dented frontiers with the presence of Israeli troops in the three hours’  distance from Cairo after the Six-Day War/ Fragile economy made weaker by the  financial strains of war and its attendant demographic dislocations/ Nasser’s  deepening dependence on the financial support of conservative Arab states he used  to blame/ The Khartoum summit’s decision to consecrate the territorial nationalism of  each Arab state as the dominant ideology and regulate inter-Arab relations on the 
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0323 - 0323 Sectarianism and Intra-state Conflict

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