20_Texas_upload-1 - I I N D E P E N D E N C E N D E P E N D...

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Unformatted text preview: I I N D E P E N D E N C E N D E P E N D E N C E and and S S ANTA ANA ANTA ANA The Struggle for Independence/ The Struggle for Independence/ Early Independent Period Early Independent Period (1810 (1810 1821) 1821) The Revolution started, September 16, 1810 in the small mining town of Dolores, 150 miles north of Mexico City. A small group of criollo conspirators was planning a revolt to take place December 8, 1810. One member of the group was Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, the local parish priest. From the time his arrival in Dolores in 1803, Hidalgo was more interested in addressing the injustices faced by his Indian and mestizo parishioners than in addressing their spiritual needs. He started many illegal businesses to help the poor miners, including growing silk worms and making silk. The group of conspirators included Captian Ignacio Allende, a local cavalry ofcer, a former local governor and his wife, Doa Josefa Ortiz de Domnguez. News of the plot leaked to the local Spanish commander. Doa Josefa Ortiz learned that their cover had been blown and sent word to Hidalgo. At 2AM on the morning of September 16, 1810 Hidalgo rang the church bell to gather his parishioners for mass--earlier than usual. His homily ended in a call to arms: Viva la Vrgen de Guadalupe! Muerte a los gachupines! Hidalgo led the arosed crowd out to take the small town of San Miguel, and the revolution was on. But the mob was unruly and they picked up thousands more as they marched from town to town. Hidalgo was unprepared for the violence against peninsulares he had unleashed. For a month and a half they wreaked havoc on one city after another. Coming to Mexico City, Hidalgo was unwilling to go on. Against military advice he withdrew....
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20_Texas_upload-1 - I I N D E P E N D E N C E N D E P E N D...

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