Chapter 6

Chapter 6 - CHE 1301 Petrucci, Harwood, Herring, Madura...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 11 CHE 1301 Petrucci, Harwood, Herring, Madura Chapter 6: Gases Dr. Bruce E. Hodson
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22 6.0 Introduction Expands to fill it’s container No fixed volume No fixed shape Easily compressed Flows to fill it’s container Fixed volume Assumes shape of container Slightly compressible Fixed volume Definite shape V. Difficult to compress
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33 6.0 Introduction
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44 6.0 Introduction Gas volume changes greatly with pressure Gas volume changes greatly with temperature Gases have relatively low viscosity Most gases have relatively low densities Gases are miscible
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55 6.1 Solids, Liquids, Gases, and Pressure
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66 6.1 Pressure of Solids Earth’s gravitational attraction pulls everything towards it’s surface Pressure (Pa) Force (N) Area (m2) = Force (Weight) = Mass (kg) × Acceleration, g (m s–2)
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77 6.1 Pressure of Liquids Earth’s gravitational attraction pulls everything towards it’s surface Pressure (Pa) Force (N) Area (m2) = Pressure = acceleration × height × density P = g × h × d P m × g A = d × V × g A = d × h × A × g A =
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88 6.1 Pressure of Gases Earth’s gravitational attraction pulls everything towards it’s surface … … the gasses of the atmosphere exert a force on all objects
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99 6.1 Pressure of Gases Gas Pressure : collision of gas molecules ( KMT theory ) with surfaces…. SI unit of pressure is the pascal (Pa) (N/m2) . kPa are often used, though Atmosphere (atm) and mmHg (Torr) are the most common units for Pressure (Pa) Force (N) Area (m2) =
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1010 6.1 Pressure of Gases Gas Pressure : collision of gas molecules ( KMT theory ) with surfaces….
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1111 6.1 Barometric (Atmospheric) Pressure Standard Atmospheric Pressure is measured by a mercury Barometer The pressure exerted by the column of mercury … must be the same as that exerted by the atmosphere. One atmosphere ( atm ) is the pressure exerted by a column of mercury exactly 760 mm high (0°C, g = 9.80665 m s–2)
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1212 Standard Atmospheric Pressure in other units …. . 6.1 Barometric (Atmospheric) Pressure
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1313 6.1 Manometers Manometers are used to measure differences in pressure, or the pressure of a sample of gas Pressure is measured using the difference in the heights of mercury (or other liquid) in the two arms of the manometer
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1414 P is zero here … … so P gas = h 6.2 Closed End Manometers If the liquid is mercury, ∆ h can be expressed directly in mmHg If the liquid is not mercury, remember P = g d h
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1515 We see that gas pressure is greater than outside pressure For part (b), what is P gas if Δ h = 100 mm and P bar= 760 mm? 6.2 Open End Manometers
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Without doing detailed calculations, arrange the drawings in Figure 5.5 so that the pressures denoted in red are in increasing order. Manometer Problem
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Chapter 6 - CHE 1301 Petrucci, Harwood, Herring, Madura...

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