krm8_ism_ch09 - Chapter 9 Lean Systems DISCUSSION QUESTIONS...

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Chapter 9 Lean Systems DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 1. Many students buy into lean systems as a philosophy until they are faced with the prospect of having their own work evaluated on the basis of performance of a group rather than as an individual. This discussion will probably uncover conflicts between our culture and lean systems philosophy. The discussion might be turned to look for compromises or ways lean systems could be modified to work with our culture. 2. Aspects of lean systems that have proven troublesome for some U.S. users are realignment of managerial reward systems, restrictive labor contracts, plant layouts, and adversarial supplier relationships. Our culture focuses on individuals rather than groups, and our legal system contains hurdles to forming partnerships that restrict competition. Many firms have already overcome these obstacles. 3. The answer here will vary. Most students will draw "input - process - output" type drawings. For example ordering an item at a fast food restaurant. Order in - materials gathered (buns, meat, cheese, condiments) - materials assembled - order served. PROBLEMS 1. Harvey Motorcycles a. What is the cycle time for the assembly line? c r = = = = 1 7 00555 333 hours 126 motorcycles hours motorcycle minutes motorcycle . . b. If Harvey uses small-lot production, what is the batch size of each model? The greatest common divisor of the production requirements for each motorcycle is 6. Therefore, Golden = 9 LX 2000 = 7 Tiger = 5
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Managing Processes Repeat the sequence six times per shift, for a total of (6 × 3) = 18 setups. G L G L T G L G L G L T G L G T G L T G T —other sequences are possible. d. Now the greatest common divisor is 13. Therefore, Golden = 4 LX 2000 = 3 Tiger = 2 Cheetah = 1 Repeat the sequence 13 times per shift, for a total of (13 × 4) = 52 setups. Unless the setup time is reduced, there may be too much loss of capacity in performing 52 setups per day. 2. Spradleys’ Sprockets k d w p c k k = + ( 29 + ( 29 = + + ( 29 = 1 500 020 180 1 005 20 525 α . . . . 3. LeWin a. Solving for implied policy variable, α ( 29 ( 29 1 d w p a k c + + = ( 29 ( 29 1,800 1.05 0.003 300 1 12 300 a + + = ( 29 ( 29 ( 29 12 300 1 1.0256 1,800 1.05 0.003 300 a + = = + 1.0256 1 0.0256 = - = b. Reduction in waiting time ( 29 ( 29 1,800 0.90 1.0256 1,846 1,661.47 11 300 300 w w + + = = 1,846 3,300 1,661.47 w = - 0.888 days w = The reduction in waiting time is: 105 0888 105 1543% . . . . =
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This note was uploaded on 12/19/2009 for the course MANAGEMENT 00123 taught by Professor Ahmed during the Spring '09 term at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

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krm8_ism_ch09 - Chapter 9 Lean Systems DISCUSSION QUESTIONS...

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