Krajewski IN Chapter 16 - Chapter 16 Scheduling A....

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Chapter 16 Scheduling A. Scheduling Across the Organization 1. Emphasize that scheduling is part of everyday life. TEACHING TIP Scheduling allocates resources over time to accomplish specific tasks. Ask the students how they schedule some of their everyday activities, such course work activities and other college life activities. Show how “Scheduling” fits into the text paradigm figure. Mention the nature of scheduling at Air New Zealand. If possible, show the video “Service Scheduling at New Zealand” that accompanies it. 2. Scheduling involves an enormous amount of detail and affects every process in a firm. 3. Types of scheduling a. Demand b. Workforce c. Operations 4. With the development of computer hardware and software and the availability of the Internet, firms have transformed the scheduling process into a competitive weapon. B. Scheduling Service and Manufacturing Processes 1. Performance measures a. Job flow time The amount of time a job spends in the service or manufacturing system. Minimizing job flow times supports the competitive priorities of cost (lower inventory) and time (delivery speed). Job flow time = Time of completion Time job was available for first processing operation Job flow time is sometimes referred to as throughout time or time spent in the system, including service. b. Makespan The total amount of time required to complete a group of jobs. Minimizing makespan supports the competitive priorities of cost (lower inventory) and time (delivery speed). Makespan = Time of completion of last job Starting time of first job 16-1
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16-2 Chapter 16: Scheduling c. Past due The amount of time by which a job misses its due date or the percentage of total jobs processed over some period of time that missed their due dates. Minimizing the past due measure supports the competitive priorities of cost (penalties for missing due dates), quality (perceptions of poor service), and time (on-time delivery). d. Work-in-process inventory (WIP) Any job that is waiting in line, moving from one operation to the next, being delayed for some reason, being processed, or residing in a semifinished state. Minimizing WIP supports the competitive priorities of cost (inventory holding costs) e. Total inventory Used to measure the effectiveness of schedules for manufacturing processes. Total inventory = Scheduled receipts for all items + On-hand inventories of all items Minimizing total inventory supports the competitive priorities of cost (inventory holding costs). f. Utilization The percentage of work time that is productively spent by an employee or a machine. Maximizing the utilization of a process supports the competitive priority of cost (slack capacity). 2.
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This note was uploaded on 12/19/2009 for the course MANAGEMENT 00123 taught by Professor Ahmed during the Spring '09 term at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

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Krajewski IN Chapter 16 - Chapter 16 Scheduling A....

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