Quiz Review III.pdf - 20th century Quiz 3 review Arch 3211 | Spring 2019 History survey of world architecture Ii XIV US American Architecture McMillan

Quiz Review III.pdf - 20th century Quiz 3 review Arch 3211...

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Quiz 3 review Arch 3211 | Spring 2019 History survey of world architecture Ii 20th century
McMillan Plan for Washington D.C. XIV. US American Architecture The designs of the City Beautiful Movement (closely tied with the municipal art movement) are identifiable by their classical architecture (Beaux-Arts), plan symmetry, picturesque views, axial plans, as well as their magnificent scale. The City Beautiful movement proposed the ideal of creating social order and harmony through aesthetic order and beautification, raise common pride/identification of rapid growing urban population (urbanization fueled by industrialization) in a time of social upheaval, slum clearing with large scale Beaux-Arts monumental structures of the “White City”, defining a “city core” or “civic center”
S. Grant of Plan. in and
American Style: Adler & Sullivan and the Chicago School
office block, steel rails raft large area. they did not American Style: Adler & Sullivan and the Chicago School
Wainwright Building St. Louis, MO, 1890–91 Guaranty Building (aka Prudential Bldg.) Buffalo, NY, 1894–96
Carson, Pirie, Scott and Company Building Louis Sullivan - 1904 Merchants’ National Bank, 1909-1914
American Style: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie Houses
American Style: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie Houses
American Style: Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie Houses
XV. Modern Avant-gardesLoos thinks of the loss of ornamentation representing cultural evolution and progress, poses that the development of any NEW ornament (Art Nouveau, Viennese Secession) be a cultural impossibility or fraud; in his text Loos differentiates between “art” extraordinary, revolutionary, directed to the future) and “culture” (comforting, appeasing, affirmative, conservative, traditional), where architecture & everyday objects belong to “culture”, i.e. need to respond only to comfort, taste, and tradition (evolution); Loos poses that art” would be a “lie”: art as radical and abstract could never be “applied” to Loos orients himself at (Anglo-American) fashion and urban manners as well as engineering and a presumably unintentional vernacular and he would (radical, “applied everyday uses; (modern)

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