Overpopulation_pop+control_part+2_students

Overpopulation_pop+control_part+2_students - Overpopulation...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Overpopulation and Population Control –Part±II Cunningham and Cunningham (2009): Chapter 4 Miller (2003): Chapter 11 Population Reference Bureau (PRB) (2009): www.prb.org
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lecture Outline z Population Control z Case Study: Mainland China
Background image of page 2
Controlling Population Growth Populations change due to z Births z Deaths z Migrations How can a government reduce the growth rate of its population?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1. Controlling Migration Only a few countries allow large annual immigration (e.g. Canada, Australia, U.S.) z In U.S., 1990 1998 z Immigrants: ~30% of population Major types of migration flows z Labor z Family reunification z Refugees or asylees z War z Politics z Natural disasters (earthquakes, flooding, drought) z Environmental degradation (desertification, deforestation, resources shortage) z Illegal migrants
Background image of page 4
News Clip (1): “Migrant Population Hits 140 Million” Associated Press in Beijing (6 January 2005) China's migrants now total 140 million About 10 per cent of China's 1.3 billion people are on the move, having left rural or less developed areas for new opportunities in the cities and more prosperous coastal regions , the official Xinhua News Agency said. China's migrant population, which was 70 million in 1973, hit 140 million in 2003… The vast numbers of migrants could make it hard for China to enforce its one child policy because of the difficulty of monitoring the births of migrant couples, the report said. About 70 per cent of China's migrants are aged between 15 and 35 Some 40 million Europeans went to the United States between 1820 and 1924
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2. Reducing Birth Rates a) Economic development b) Family planning c) Empowering women
Background image of page 6
2a) Economic Development A couple may desire fewer children if they have z Increased access to education z More economic security z Do not need to consider children as old age security
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2a) Economic Development (cont) Frank Notestein (a demographer) (1945): Demographic Transition : A typical pattern of falling death rates and birth rates due to improved living conditions As countries become industrialized 1 st ) Death rates decline 2 nd ) Birth rates decline
Background image of page 8
Demographic Transition Miller (2003) Stage 1 Preindustrial Stage 2 Transitional Stage 3 Industrial Stage 4 Postindustrial
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
(i) Pre-industrial Stage Harsh living conditions z High birth rates to counteract high infant mortalities Miller (2003)
Background image of page 10
(ii) Transitional Stage Industrialization begins z Death rates drop z Birth rates remain high Miller (2003)
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
(iii) Industrial Stage Industrialization widespread z Birth rates drop z Death rates remain stable Miller (2003)
Background image of page 12
(iv) Post-industrial Stage Relative high living standard z Birth rates fall further, equaling death rates z Then, birth rates < death rates Miller (2003)
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Demographic Transition: Developed Countries vs Developing Countries z Most developing countries: Transitional phase z Most developed countries: Industrial stage z A few developed countries: Postindustrial stage Rate (per 1000 of population) In postindustrial
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/22/2009 for the course BISC BISC003 taught by Professor Qian/ren/ko during the Fall '09 term at HKUST.

Page1 / 36

Overpopulation_pop+control_part+2_students - Overpopulation...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online