Solid and hazardous waste_color

Solid and hazardous waste_color - Solid and Hazardous Waste...

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1 Solid and Hazardous Waste Chapter 13
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2 Outline: Solid Waste Waste Disposal Methods Shrinking the Waste Stream ± Recycling Hazardous and Toxic Wastes ± Federal Legislation - RCRA - CERCLA ± Management Options Hong Kong MSW
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3 WASTE According to EPA, U.S. produces 11 billion tons of solid waste annually. ± About half is agricultural waste. ± More than one-third is mining related. ± Industrial Waste - 400 million metric tons. - Hazardous/Toxic - 60 million metric tons. ± Municipal Waste - 230 million metric tons. - Two kg per person / per day. ¾ Waste Stream
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4 Municipal Solid Waste Production and Recycling
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5 U.S. Domestic Waste
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6 WASTE DISPOSAL METHODS Open Dumps ± Open, unregulated dumps are still the predominant method of waste disposal in developing countries. - Most developed countries forbid open dumping. ¾ Estimated 200 million liters of motor oil are poured into the sewers or soak into the ground each year in the U.S. ² Five times volume of Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989 in Alaska.
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7 Scavengers sort through the trash at “smoky mountain” in Manila, Philippines Trash at Sea
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8 WASTE DISPOSAL METHODS CONT’D Landfills ± Sanitary Landfills - Refuse compacted and covered everyday with a layer of dirt. ¾ Dirt takes up as much as 20% of landfill space. ² Since 1994, all operating landfills in the U.S. have been required to control hazardous substances.
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9 Sanitary Landfills
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10 Secure Landfills
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11 Landfills Historically, landfills have been a convenient, inexpensive waste-disposal option. ± Increasing land and shipping fees, and demanding construction and maintenance requirements are increasing costs. - Suitable landfill sites are becoming scarce. - Increasingly, communities are rejecting new landfills. - Old landfills are quickly reaching capacity and closing.
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12 WASTE DISPOSAL METHODS CONT’D Exporting Waste ± Although most industrialized nations have agreed to stop shipping hazardous and toxic waste to less-developed countries, the practice still continues. - Garbage imperialism also operates in wealthier countries. - Indian reservations increasingly being approached to store wastes on reservations.
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WASTE DISPOSAL METHODS CONT’D Incineration and Resource Recovery ± Energy Recovery - Heat derived from incinerated refuse is a useful resource. -
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Solid and hazardous waste_color - Solid and Hazardous Waste...

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