Introduction to databases

Introduction to databases - Databases v. Database...

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Databases v. Database Management Systems Learning objective After completing this topic, you should be able to differentiate between a database and a Database Management System (DBMS). 1. What is a database? A database is a collection of related information and comprises objects. A database object called a "table" organizes information into a logical structure and provides access to the information in the database. For example, all employee numbers, employee names, first names, last names, salaries, benefit packages, and managers comprise a table. A database can comprise many related tables that together define all the information about a "real" world system or model. Users can modify the information in the database and retrieve information from it. For example, if an employee is promoted to a new job level, the manager can update the database to reflect the employee's new salary scale. The business processes of an organization determine the data and the data processes in a database. 1
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For example, when Brocadero Online University receives an applicant for a Math course, the secretary receiving the application has to create an application number enter the applicant's details notify the math department Database examples include data warehouses Geographical Information Systems (GISs) Online Transactional-Processing (OLTP) databases data warehouses A data warehouse is used for extracting and analyzing information from large databases to make business decisions. Applications, such as an Online Analytical-Processing (OLAP) system, a Decision Support System (DSS), and a data-mining application are used to gain access to a data warehouse. Geographical Information Systems (GISs) A GIS database stores and analyzes maps, satellite images, and weather data. Online Transactional-Processing (OLTP) databases An OLTP database processes data regularly from multiple transactions running at the same time. The transactions usually process the same amount of data. For example, an OLTP database includes dynamic data, such as the stock in a store, that is updated regularly. Question What do you think are some of the benefits of using a database? Options: 1. It enforces format and datatype standards 2. It has a flexible structure for updating information 3. It provides available and up-to-date information 4. It reduces the administration costs of an organization 5. It updates fields automatically Answer A database enforces format and datatype standards, has a flexible structure for updating information, provides available and up-to-date information, and reduces the administration costs of an organization. Question 2
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What is a data warehouse? Options: 1. A database that stores maps 2. A database that regularly processes multiple transactions at a time 3. A large database from which you can extract and analyze information. Answer
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Introduction to databases - Databases v. Database...

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