1Tues_Microscopy

1Tues_Microscopy - Lab Exercise 2: The Microscope...

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Lab Exercise 2: The Microscope Objectives Once you have completed this exercise, you should be able to do the following: 1. Know the parts of the compound scope and their functions. 2. Use the scope to focus on stained organisms. 3. Use a stage micrometer to measure the field of view (FOV) and estimate size of organisms. 4. Properly clean and store the scope. Parts of the Compound Microscope Stage This is a platform on which the microscope slide will rest and is centered over the light source. The mechanical portion of the stage can be adjusted either vertically or horizontally to center the specimen over the light source Light source. A light microscope uses visible light to view the specimen. The intensity of light provided is controlled by both an on/off switch and a light intensity dial. For most experiments in this laboratory, we will have the intensity dial set to maximum. Usually the higher the magnification, the more light is needed. Condenser The condenser is composed of 2 sets of lenses found directly below the stage, which collect and concentrate the light upward into the lens systems. The condenser also has an iris diaphragm , which can be used to regulate the amount of light entering the lens system. For most experiments in this laboratory, the condenser will be set just a quarter turn short of it’s maximum height (closest to the stage). Use the diaphragm to regulate the amount of light passing through the slide. As a rule of thumb, as the magnification increases, the diaphragm must be opened to allow more light in to view the sample. Objective Lenses This is the first set of lenses that will magnify the specimen for viewing. These are found on the nosepiece that rotates, which allows you to change the magnification power based the objective in place. For this laboratory, we will use objective lenses, which magnify 4x,
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10x, 40 x, or 100x. Our microscopes are also what are called par focal , which means that when one lens is in focus, the others have the same focal length and can be rotated into
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1Tues_Microscopy - Lab Exercise 2: The Microscope...

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