Bigbook_02 - TEST 2 SECTION 1 Time—~30 minutes 38...

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Unformatted text preview: TEST 2 SECTION 1 Time—~30 minutes 38 Questions 5. Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words, Choose the word or set of words for each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. ' 1. In the British theater young people under thirty-five have not had much ---- -- getting recognition onstage, but offstage—in the ranks of playwrights, directors, designers, administrators—they have mostly been relegated to relative obscurity. (A) trouble (D) success at (B) satisfaction (E) fear of (C) curiosity about Ix) An institution concerned about its reputation isat’ the mercy of the actions of its members, because the misdeeds of individuals are often used to ---- --4 the institutions of which they are a part. (B) coerce (C) honor (E) intimidate (A) reform (D) discredit 3. Since many casual smokers develop lung cancer and many — ---- -- smokers do not, scientists believe that individuals differ in their - - the cancer—causing agents known to be present in cigarette smoke. (A) heavy. .susceptibility to (B) chronic. .concem about (C) 'habitual. .proximity to (D) devoted. .reliance upon (E) regular. .exposure to 4. We accepted the theory that as people become more independent of one another, they begin to feel so isolated and lonely that freedom becomes ---—- condition that most will seek to ----. (A) a permanent. .postpone (B) a common. .enter (C) a negative. .escape (D) a political. .impose (E) an irreparable. .avoid 69 If animal parents were judged by human standards, the cuckoo would be one of nature’s more -——-- creatures, blithely laying its eggs in the nests of other birds, and leaving the incubating and nurturing to them. (A) mettlesome (C) domestic (D) lackluster (B) industrious (E) feckless . The current penchant for ——-——— a product by deni— grating a rival, named in the advertisement by brand name, seems somewhat ---- --: suppose the con- sumer remembers only the rival‘s name? (A) criticizing. .inefficient (B) touting. .foolhardy (C) enhancing. .insipid (D) evaluating. .cumbersome ‘ (E) flaunting. .gullible ~ Crcducik5, a’eca'ual’ln— ,(Ws’wj . His impenurbability in the face of evidence indi-x eating his deliberate fraud failed to reassure sup- porters of his essential —--—— ; instead, it suggested a talent for ----— that they had never suspected. (A) culpability. .intrigue (B) wisdom. .reproof (C) remorse. .loquacity (D) probity. .guile (E) combativeness. .compromise . GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. I3. MOCKleITATE (A) satirize:charm (B) condensczsummarize (C) placate:assua'ge" Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is fouowed by five lettered pairs- of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. JUDGE : GAVEL 2: (A) detective: uniform (B) doctor:stethoscope (C) referee : whistle (D) soldierzinsignia (E) lecturer : podium 14. (D) adapt : duplicate (E) taunt : challenge MALADROIT : SKILL :: (A) intemperate:anger (B) unreasonablezinmition (C) sluggishzfafig'ue (D) glib2profundity (E) moroserdepression 9. ORGAN:KIDNEY:: . (A) skeleton : kneecap ' [5. EQUIVOCATION 1 AMBIGUOUS :: (B) bone : rib (A) mitigation : severe (C) neuronzsy'napse (B) contradictionzpcremptory (D) abdomenzstomach (C) platitude:banal (E) blood : aorta (D) precept: obedient (E) explanation : unintelligible IO. SOOT:COMBUSTION:: - (A) lintzbrushing l6. VOLATILE:TEMPER:: ll. 12. (B) gravel : crushing (C) gristle : tenderizing (D) rubbishzhouseclcaning (E) sawdustzwoodcutting PURIFY : IMPERFECI'ION :: (A) align : adjustment (B) weary : boredom (C) disagreezcontroversy (D) verify: doubtfulness (E) hone: sharpness CENTRIFUGE : SEPARATE :: (A) thermometer:calibrate (B) statuezchisel (C) floodgatezoverflow (D) colander: drain (E) television : transmit 70 (A) prominent: notoriety (B) readyzwit (C) catastrophiczdisaster (D) gentle: hean (E) expressive: song GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Line (5) I0} [5) Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. (This passage is from an article published in 1973) The recent change to all-volunteer armed forces in the United States will eventually produce a gradual increase in the proportion of women in the armed forces and in the variety of women’s assignments, but probably not the dramatic gains for women that might have been expected. This is so even though the armed forces operate in an ethos of institutional change oriented toward occu- pational equality and under the federal sanction of equal pay for equal work. The difficulty is that women are unlikely to be trained for any direct combat operations. A significant portion of the larger society remains uncom- fortable as yet with extending equality in this direction. Therefore, for women in the military, the search for equality will still be based on functional equivalence, not identity or even similarity of task. Opportunities seem certain to arise. The growing emphasis on deterrence is bound to offer increasing scope for women to become involved in novel types of noncombat military assign- ments. 17. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) present an overview of the different types of assignments available to women in the new United States all-volunteer armed forces (B) present a reasoned prognosis of the status of women in the new United States all-volunteer armed'forces r W M (C) present the new United States all-volunteer armed forces as a model case of equal employment policies in action (D) analyze reforms in the new United States all- volunteer armed forces necessitated by the increasing number of women in the military (E) analyze the use of functional equivalence as a substitute for occupational equality in the new United States all-volunteer armed forces . 71 18. According to the passage, despite the United States armed forces’ commitment to occupational equality for women in the military, certain other factors preclude women’s , (A) receiving equal pay for equal work (B) having access to positions of responsibility at ' most levels (C) drawing assignments from a wider range of assignments than before , . (D)_ benefiting from opportunities arising from new noncombat functions (E) being assigned all of the military tasks that are assigned to men . The passage implies that which of the following is a factor conducive to a more equitable representation of women in the United States armed forces than has existed in the past? (A) The all-volunteer character of the present armed forces 7 (B) The past service records of women who had assignments functionally equivalent to men’s assignments (C) The level of awareness on the part of the larger society of military issues _ (D) A decline in the proportion of deterrence- oriented noncombat assignments (E) Restrictive past policies governing the military assignments open to women . The “dramatic gains for women” (line 5) and the attitude, as described in lines 1 H2, ofa “significant portion of the larger society” are logically related to each other inasmuch as the author puts forward the latter as a ' (A) a public response to achievement of the former (B) the major reason for absence of the former I (C) a precondition for any prospect of achieving the former ’ (D) a catalyst for a further extension of the former (E) a reason for some of the former being lost again GO ONTO THE NEXT PAGE. Linc ( 5 ) (10) (15) (20) (25) (30) (35) (40) {45) (50) I55) Of the thousands of specimens of meteorites found on Earth and known to science, only about 100 are igneous; that is, they have undergone melting by volca— nic action at some time since the planets were first formed. These igneous meteorites are known as achon- drites because they lack chondrules—— small stony spherules found in the thousands of meteorites (called “c'nondrites”) composed primarily of unaltered minerals that condensed from dust and gas at the origin of the solar system. Achondrites are the only known samples of volcanic rocks originating outside the Earth-Moon system. Most are thought to have been dislodged by interbody impact from asteroids, with diameters of from 10 to 500 kilometers, in solar orbit between Mars and Jupiter. . Shergottites, the name given to three anomalous achondrites so far discovered on Earth, present scientists with a genuine enigma. Shergottites crystallized from molten rock less than 1.1 billion years ago (some 3.5 billion years later than typical achondrites) and were presumably ejected into space when an object impacted on a body similar in chemical composition to Earth. While most meteorites appear to derive from compar- atively small bodies, shergottites exhibit properties that indicate that their source was a large planet, conceivably Mars. In order to account for such an unlikely source, some unusual factor must be invoked, because the impact needed to accelerate a fragment of rock to escape the gravitational field of a body even as small as the Moon is so great that no meteorites of lunar origin have been discovered. While some scientists speculate, that shergottites derive from 10' (a volcanically active moon of Jupiter), recent measurements suggest that since Io‘s surface is rich in sulfur and sodium, the chemical composition of its volcanic products would probably be unlike that of the shergottites. Moreover, any fragments dislodged from 10 by interbody impact would be unlikely to escape the gravitational pull of Jupiter. . The only other logical source of shergottites is Mars. Space-probe photographs indicate the existence of giant volcanoes on the Martian surface. From the small number of impact craters that appear on Martian lava flows, one can estimate that the planet was volcanically active as recently as a half-billion years ago—and may be active today. The great objection to the Martian origin of shergottites is the absence of lunar meteorites on Earth. An impact capable of ejecting a fragment of the Martian surface into an Earth-intersecting orbit is even less probable than such an event on the Moon, in view of the Moon's smaller size and closer proximity to Earth. A recent study suggests, however, that permafrost ices below the surface of Mars may have altered the effects of impact on it. If the ices had been rapidly vapor- ized by an impacting object, the expanding gases might have helped the ejected fragm‘Ents reach escape velocity. Finally, analyses performed by space probes show a remarkable chemical similarity between Martian soil and the shergottites. 72 21. The passage implies which of the following about shergottites? ' I. They are products of volcanic activity. II. They derive from a planet larger than Earth. III. They come from a planetary body with a chem— ical composition similar to that of Io. (A) Ionly (B) II only (C) I and II only (D) II and III only (E) I, II, and III 22. According to the passage, a meteorite discovered on Earth is unlikely to have come from a large planet for which of the following reasons? (A) There are fewer large planets in the solar system than there are asteroids. . (B) Most large planets have been volcanically inac- tive for more than a billion years. (C) The gravitational pull of a large planet would probably prohibit fragments from escaping its orbit. . (D) There are no chondrites occurring naturally on Earth and probably none on other large planets. (E) Interbody impact is much rarer on large than on small planets because of the density of the atmosphere on large planets. 23. The passage suggests that the age of shergottites is probably (A) still entirely undetermined (B) less than that of most other achondrites (C) about 3.5 billion years (D) the same as that of typical achondrites (E) greater than that of the Earth _GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 24. 25. According to the passage, the presence of chon- drules in a meteorite indicates that the meteorite (A) has probably come from Mars (B) is older than the solar system itself (C) has not been melted since the solar system formed (D) is certainly less than 4 billion years old (E) is a small fragment of an asteroid The passage provides information to answer which of the following questions? (A) What is the precise age of the solar system? (B) How did shergottites get their name? (C) What are the chemical properties shared by shergottites and Martian soils? (D) How volcanically active is the planet Jupiter? (E) What is a major feature of the Martian surface? 73 26. It can be'inferred from the passage that each of the 27. following is a consideration in determining whether a particular planet is a possible source of shergottites that have been discovered on Earth EXCEPT the (A) planet’s size (B) planet‘s distance from Earth (C) strength of the planet‘s field of gravity (D) proximity of the planet to its moons (E) chemical composition of the planet’s surface It can be inferred from the passage that most mete- orites found on Earth contain which of the following? (A) Crystals (B) Chondrules (C) Metals (D) Sodium (E) Sulfur GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. a} . .-.-. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words, » or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. l 28. LIMP: (A) true (B) firm (C) clear (D) stark (E) endless 29. GLOBAL: (A) local (B) unusual (C) unpredictable (D) hot-headed (E) single-minded 30. STABILITY: (A) disparity (B) inconstancy I (C) opposition (D) carelessness (E)'Weariness (B) strengthen (E) soften 31. DILATE: (A) narrow (C) bend (D) push 32. CONSOLE: (A) pretend sympathy (B) reveal suffering (C) aggravate grief (D) betray (E) vilify 74 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. EXCULPATE: (A) attribute guilt (B) avoid responsibility (C) establish facts (D) control hostilities (E) show anxiety ACCRETION: (A) ingestion of a nutrient (B) loss of the security on a loan (C) discernment of subtle differences (D) reduction in substance caused by erosion (E) sudden repulsion from an entity CADGE: (A) conceal (C) reserve (D) ear-n (B) influence (E) favor ABJURE: (A) commingle (C) espouse (D) appease (B) arbitrate (E) pardon SPECIOUS: (A) unfeigned (B) significant (C) valid (D) agreeable (E) restricted QUOTIDIAN: (A) extraordinary (B) certain (C) wishful (D) secret (E) premature Time—430 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or tv'vo blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that E fits the meaning of the sentence as awhole. 1. Although providing wild chimpanzees with food makes them less —-—-— and easier to study, it is also known to ---- -- their normal social patterns. (A) interesting. .reinforce (B) manageable. .upset (C) shy. .disrupt (D) poised. .inhibit (E) accessible. .retard 2. There is,something --—— about the way the building of monasteries proliferated in eighteenth-century Bavaria, while in the rest of the Western world reli— giousvardor was -v---— and church building was consequently declining. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) enigmatic. .coalescing destructive. .changing immutable. .dissipating incongruous. .diminishing momentous. .diversifying 3. Because they had various meanings in nineteenth- century biological thought. “mechanism” and “vitalism” ought not to be considered ---- -- terms; thus, I find the recent insistence that the terms had single definitions to be entirely —------ . (A) univocal. .erroneous (B) problematic. .anachronistic (C) intractable. .obtuse (D) congruent. .suspect (E) multifaceted. .vapid 4. Many Americans believe that individual initiative epitomized the 1890’s and see the entrepreneur as the ----- -- of that age. (A) caricature (D) aberration (B) salvation (C) throwback (E) personification 88 5. Neither the ideas of philosophers nor the practices of ordinary people can, by themselves, ---- -- reality; what in fact changes reality and kindles revolution is the -——- of the two. (A) constitute. .divergence (B) affect. .aim (C) transform. .interplay (D) preserve. .conjunction - (E) alter. .intervention 6. There has been a tendency among art historians not so much to revise as to eliminate the concept of the Renaissance—to not only its uniqueness, but its very existence. (B) extol (E) contest (A) explain (D) regret (C) transmute 7. Employees had become so inured to the caprices of top management's personnel policies that they greeted the announcement of a company—wide dress code with-——. (B) impassivity (D) apprehension (A) astonishment (C) resentment (B) confusion GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directionsf In each of the following questions, a related 13. DAMP : VIBRATION :; pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs (A) drench : moisture of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best (B) concentrate : extraction expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the (C) boil : liquid original pair. 8. SURGEON : DEXTERITY :: - (A) engineer : clarity l4. ABRADED : FRICTION :: (B) sailorrnavigation (A) refinedzdistillate (C) magistrate:precedent (B) anodized:metal (D) industrialistzcapital (C) dilutedzgas (E) acrobat : agility (D) strengthened : pressure (E) vaporized : heat 9‘ PRUNE:HEDGE:: (A) shuck : com 15. QUARRY : STONE :: (B) trim : hair (A) fell : timber (C) cut; bouquet (B) dredgezcanal (D) reap : crop (C) assay: gold (E) shave : mustache (D) bale : hay (E) moldzclay l0. PHOTOGRAPH : LIGHT :: (A) script : scene l6. CREDULOUS : DUPE :: (B) film:negative (A) wealthy:monarch (C) recording:sound (B) insensitivezboor (D) rehearsal : practice (C) argumentative : lawyer (E) concert : song ‘ (D) spontaneous : extrovert ' (E) extravagant : miser l l, ANTIBIOTIC : INFECTION :: (A) hormone: modification (B) enzyme : digestion ' (C) narcotic: dependency (D) coagulant: bleeding ' g I (E) stimulant : relaxation GO ON To THE NEXT PAGE- 12. EULOGY:PRAISE;: (A) comedy:laughter (B) epiczcsnternpt (C) tirade:awe (D) elegy: lament (E) parody: respect 89 (D) seal : perforation (E) stanchzllow (5) (10) (15} (20) Directions: Each passage in this grOup is followed by questions based on its content, After reading a passage, choose that passage. The transplantation of organs from one individual to another normally involves two major problems: (1) organ rejection is likely, unless the transplantation antigens of both individuals are nearlyidentical, and (2) the introduction of any unmatched transplantation antigens induces the development by the recipient of donor—specific lymphocytes that will produce violent rejection of further transplantations from that donor. However, we have found that among many strains of rats these “normal” rules of transplantation are not obeyed by liver transplants. Not only are liver trans- plants never rejected, but they even induce a state of donor-specific unresponsiveness in which subsequent transplants of other organs, such as skin, from that donor are accepted permanently. Our hypothesis is that (1) many strains of rats simply cannot mount a sufficiently vigorous destructive immune-response (using lymphocytes) to outstrip the liver’s relatively great capacity to protect itself from immune-response damage and that (2) the systemic unresponsiveness observed is due to concentration of the recipient’s donor-specific lymphocytes at the site of the liver transplant. 17. The primary purpose of the passage is to treat the accepted generalizations about organ transplanta- tion in which of the following ways? (A) Explicate their main features (B) Suggest an alternative to them (C) Examine their virtues and limitations (D) Criticize the major evidence used to support them (E) Present findings that qualify them 18. It can be inferred from the passage that the author believes that an important difference among strains of rats is the (A) size of their livers (B) constitution of their skin (C) strength of their immune-response reactions (D) sensitivity of their antigens (E) adaptability of their lymphocytes 90 the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following'a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in 19. According to the hypothesis of the author, after a successful liver transplant, the reason that rats do not reject further transplants of other organs from the same donor is that the (A) transplantation antigens of the donor and the recipient become matched (B) lymphocytes of the recipient are weakened by the activity of the transplanted liver (C) subsequently transplanted organ is able to repair the damage caused by the recipient's , immune—response reaction (D) transplanted liver continues to be the primary locus for the recipient's immune—response ’ r reaction (E) recipient is unable to manufacture the lymphocytes necessary for the immune- response reaction 20. Which,of the following newlindings about strains of rats that do not normally reject liver transplants, if true, would support the authors’ hypothesis? I. Stomach transplants are accepted by the recipients in all cases. II. Increasing the strength of the recipient's immune—response reaction can induce liver-transplant rejection. Organs from any other donor can be transplanted without rejection after liver transplantation: Preventing lymphocytes from being concen‘ trated at the liver transplant produces accep- tance of skin transplants. (A) II only (B) I and III only (C) II and 1V only (D) I, II, and III only (E) I, III, and IV only III. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. [Jne '10} ‘15) ’30) 3‘) in; 35) 40) 50) Practically speaking, the artistic maturing of the cinema was the single-handed achievement of David W. Griffith (18754948). Before Griffith, photography in dramatic films consisted of little more than placing the actors before a stationary camera and showing them in full length as they would have appeared on stage. From the beginning of his career as a director, however, Griffith, because of his love of Victorian! painting, employed composition. He conceived of the camera image as having a foreground and a rear ground, as well as the middle distance preferred by most directors. By 1910 he was using close-ups to reveal significant details of the scene or of the acting and extreme long shots to achieve a sense of spectacle and distance. His appreciation of the camera’s possibili- ties produced novel dramatic effects. By splitting an event into fragments and recording each from the most suitable camera position, he could significantly vary the emphasis from camera shot to camera shot. Griffith also achieved dramatic effectsby means of creative editing. By juxtaposing images and varying the speed and rhythm of their presentation, he could control the dramatic intensity of the events as the story progressed. Despite the reluctance of his producers, who feared that the public would not be able to follow a plot that was made up of such juxtaposed images, Griffith persisted, and experimented as well with other elements of cinematic syntax that have become standard ever since. These included the flashback, permitting broad psychological and emotional exploration as well as narrative that was not chronological, and the crosscut between two parallel actions to heighten suspense and excitement. In thus exploiting fully the possibilities of editing, Griffith transpOSed devices of the Victorian novel to film and gave film mastery of time as well as space. I , _ K V, , A,__ _ Besides developing the cinema‘s language, Griffith immensely broadened its range and treatment of sub- jects. His early output was remarkably eclectic: it included not only the standard comedies, melodramas, WeStems, and thrillers, but also such novelties as adapta- tions from Browning and Tennyson, and treatments of social issues. As his successes mounted, his ambitions grew, and with them the whole of American cinema. When he remade Enoch Arden in 191 l, he insisted that a subject of such importance could not be treated in the then conventional length of one reel. Griffith’s introduc- tion of the American-made multireel picture began an immense revolution. Two years later, Judith of Bethulia, an elaborate historicophilosophical spectacle, reached the unprecedented length of four reels, or one hour’s running time. From our contemporary viewpoint, the pretensions of this film may Seem a trifle ludicrous, but at the time it provoked endless debate and discussion - and gave a new intellectual respectability to the cinema. 91 21. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) discuss the importance of Griffith to the devel— opment of the cinema (B) describe the impact on cinema of the flashback and other editing innovations (C) deplore the state of American cinema before the advent of Griffith ‘ . (D) analyze the changes in the cinema wrought by the introduction of the multireel film ' (E) document Griffith’s impact on the choice of subject matter in American films The author suggests that Griffith’s film innovations had a direct effect on all of the following EXCEPT (A) film editing (B) camera work (C) scene composing (D) sound editing (E) directing 22. 23. It can be inferred from the passage that before 1910 the normal running time ofa film was (A) 15 minutes or less (B) between 15 and 30 minutes (C) between 30 and 45 minutes (D) betWeen 45 minutes and 1 hour (E) 1 hour or more 24. The author asserts that Griffith introduced all of the following into American cinema EXCEPT (A) consideration of social issues (B) adaptations from Tennyson (C) the flashback and other editing techniques (D) photographic approaches inspired by Victorian painting ' ‘ -—~‘ '* ' ‘ ' (E) dramatic plots suggested by Victorian theater GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 25. The author suggests that Griffith’s contributions to the cinema had which of the following results? I. Literary works, especially Victorian novels, i became popular sources for film subjects. II. Audience appreciation of other film directors’ experimentations with cinematic syntax was increased. Many of the artistic limitations thought to be'inherent in filmmaking were shown to be really nonexistent. (A) II only (B) III only (C) I and II only (D) II and III only (E) I, II, and III III. 26. It can be inferred from the passage that Griffith 27. would be most likely to agree with which of the following statements? (A) The good director will attempt to explore new ideas as quickly as possible. (B) The most important element contributing to a film’s success is the ability of the actors. (C) The camera must be considered an integral and active element in the creation of a film. (D) The cinema should emphasize serious and sober examinations of fundamental human problems. (E) Theproper composition of scenes in a film is more important than the details of their editing. The author’s attitude toward photography in the cinema before Griffith can best be described as (A) sympathetic (C) amused .(D) condescending (B) nostalgic (E) hostile GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word' 7 printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. v Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning; be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. ADHERE: (A) detach (D) incise (E) contain (B) cleanse (C) engulf UNCONVENTIONALITY: (A) perceptibility (B) inscrutability (C) irnperturbability (D) fidelity to custom. (E) formality of discourse 30. PINCH: (A) important accomplishment (B) apt translation (C) abundant amount (D) opportune acquisition (E) unfamiliar period 31. OUTSET: (A) regression (D) interruption (B) series (C) exit (E) termination . RAREFY: (A) make less humid (B) make less opaque (C) make more voluminous (D) make more dense (E) make more oily ' 33.‘ 93 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. EFFRON’I‘ERY; (menamy (B) deference (C) simplicity (D) deceitfulness (E) stupidity SCURVY: (A) completely centered (B) above reproach (C) imaginative (D) valiant (E) carefree OBDURATE: (A) complaisant (C) commensurate (E) transitory (B) similar (D) uncommunicative AVER: (A) resign indignantly (B) condemn unjustly (C) refuse (D) deny (E) resent PITH: (A) untimely action (B) insufficient attention (D) rigid formulation (C) routine treatment (E) superficial element SUPINE: (A) vigilant (C) distorted (B) fiustered (D) brittle (E) awkward FOR GENERAL TEST 2 ONLY Answer Key and Percentages* of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly QUANTITATIVE ABILITY Section 2 mm- ANALYTICAL ABILITY VERBAL ABILITY ’ ' Section 3 Section 6 — mm- Number Answer P+ Number Answer Numb" Answer Number Answer A C r B A 1 1 a D 0 " D C 2 B 2 D A A A B 3 E 3 E c E o A 4 c 4 E E C B C 5 C 5 D B E A B 6 E 6 C D B B B 7 A 7 C C E A D E A 3 D B B D A 9 B 9 E E C A B 10 D 10 B D 0 C C 11 a 11 E D D B D 12 C 12 E E E D A 13 E 13 3 D E B D 14 E 14 A C A C C 15 A 15 A . B a D E 16 D 15 A 8 E D C 17 3 17 C E C C A 13 A 13 B A D B E 19 C 19 E B A D a 20 C 20 C A A A C 21 A 21 C c D o a 22 a 22 a B A B D 23 E 23 C c E E A 24 o 24 E E E E C 25 E 25 B D C C C B 0 A E 3 A C A A D E D B C E C A E C D A E D B D A C D C‘ E A A 'Eslimaled P+ Ior the group a! examinees who took the GRE General Test in a recent three-year period. 107 ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/22/2009 for the course BIGBOOK_01 Bigbook_01 taught by Professor Bigbook_01 during the Spring '09 term at University of Toronto- Toronto.

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Bigbook_02 - TEST 2 SECTION 1 Time—~30 minutes 38...

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