UNIFIED PROPULSION - UNIFIED PROPULSION: Learning...

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UNIFIED PROPULSION: Learning Objectives: Given the basic geometry and idealized component performance, to be able to estimate the thrust and specific impulse of a gas turbine and a rocket engine from fluid and thermodynamic principles Measurable outcomes (assessment method) : A. To be able to explain at a level understandable by a high school senior or non-technical person what the various terms are in the integral momentum equation and how jet propulsion works. (quiz, self-assessment) B. To be able to apply control volume analysis and the integral momentum equation to estimate the forces produced by aerospace propulsion systems (homework, quiz, self-assessment) C. To be able to describe the principal figures of merit for aircraft engine and rocket motor performance and explain how they are related to vehicle performance. (quiz, self-assessment) D. Given weight, geometry, and aerodynamic and propulsion system performance information, to be able to estimate the power required for flight, the range, the endurance, and the time-to- climb for an aircraft.Ê (homework, quiz, self-assessment) E. Given mass fractions, and propulsion system performance information, to be able to estimate the range and velocity of single-stage rockets. (homework and quiz, self-assessment) F. To be able to describe the principal design parameters and constraints that set the performance of gas turbine engines, and to apply ideal-cycle analysis to a gas turbine engine to relate thrust and fuel burn to component-level performance parameters and flight conditions. (homework, quiz, self-assessment) G. To be able to explain at a level understandable by a high school senior or non-technical person the energy exchange processes that underlie the workings of multistage compressor or turbine, and to be able to use velocity triangles and the Euler Turbine Equation to estimate the performance of a compressor or turbine stage. (homework, quiz, self-assessment) . Introduction to Propulsion A. Goal: Create a Force to Propel a Vehicle Two options : 1. Take mass stored in a vehicle and throw it backwards ( rocket propulsion ). Use the reaction force to propel the vehicle. Propellant ---> burn ---> expand through nozzle (chem. energy) (thermal energy) (kinetic energy & momentum) Q1 ( PDF ) 2. Seize mass from the surroundings and set the mass in motion backwards. Use the reaction force to propel vehicle ( air-breathing propulsion ). Continuously: a) Draw in air. b) Compress it. c) Add fuel and burn (convert chemical energy to thermal energy). d) Expand through a turbine to drive compressor (extract work).
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e.1) Then expand in a nozzle to convert thermal energy to kinetic energy & momentum (turbojet). e.2) Or expand in a second turbine (extract work), use this to drive a shaft for
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This note was uploaded on 12/24/2009 for the course AEROSPACE engine taught by Professor Prof during the Spring '09 term at École Normale Supérieure.

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UNIFIED PROPULSION - UNIFIED PROPULSION: Learning...

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