Wavelength-Multiplexed Sensors for Temperature and Species in Engines

Wavelength-Multiplexed Sensors for Temperature and Species in Engines

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Engine researchers covet spatially and temporally-resolved measurements of temperature and gas species concentrations in the harsh combustion environments associated with modern propulsion and internal combustion devices. The benefits of real-time diagnostics are improved engine performance and reduced pollutant emissions. Water vapor is a major combustion product that may be spectroscopically probed by tunable laser sources. Figure 1: A vision for diode laser sensing and control in a gas turbine engine Near-infrared fiber-coupled distributed feedback (DFB) lasers in the 1.31 to 1.47 micron spectral region are used to probe water vapor transitions (2v2 and v1 + v3 bands). Direct absorption methods and wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy have been developed and used to measure temperature and species concentrations in several full-scale engine test facilities as well as in laboratory validation experiments in heated optical cells at low and high pressures . Figure 2: Typical experimental setup Several measurement campaigns have been undertaken at large engine test facilities, including a SCRAMJET facility, a high-pressure gas turbine sector rig, and a multi-tube high repetition rate pulsed detonation engine (PDE). All three tests have demonstrated the feasibility of making diode
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laser measurements in engine facilities with minimal intrusion. These measurement campaigns
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Wavelength-Multiplexed Sensors for Temperature and Species in Engines

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