Friction Testing - Graded Labs illness and NYC trip have...

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Unformatted text preview: Graded Labs illness and NYC trip have put us behind. I will have for Friday lab or Monday class. Will post grades earlier.  Change in abrasion test method for Friday lab due to machine breakdown. I will post new test method the resistance of one surface sliding against another creates friction  amount of friction depends on the force exerted to push one object across another surface and on the specific characteristics of the surfaces more force applied, greater abrasion - sander 2 smooth surfaces = low friction and low abrasion Fabric against fabric, e.g. shirt against jacket, clothing against upholstered furniture  Fabric against a non-textile surface, e.g. knees against floor, elbows across desk, bathing suit on sand  Between fabric components, e.g. fibers and yarns move and slide across each other in response to stretching, bending, flexing, creasing  Foreign materials within fabric, e.g. dirt, sand, salt in fabric or carpet Flat abrasion a flat area of fabric is abraded as it rubs against an abradant surface  Edge abrasion rubbing along a fold, as in hems, seamlines, creases  Flex abrasion rubbing accompanied by flexing and bending  Examples?? Fiber content: for instance, nylon is strong, with high resiliency and a low coefficient of friction  Fabric count: generally higher fabric count resists abrasion better with more yarns to absorb energy from abradant force  Yarn size: bigger is better  Fabric thickness: thicker is stronger  Yarn twist: increased yarn twist improves resistance Yarn crimp: more pronounced crimp, more abrasion. Same Yarn crimp: more pronounced crimp, more abrasion....
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Friction Testing - Graded Labs illness and NYC trip have...

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