chapter7homework - CHAPTER 7 Cash and Receivables ANSWERS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: CHAPTER 7 Cash and Receivables ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 2. (a) Cash (h) Investments, possibly other assets. (b) Trading securities. (i) Cash. (c) Temporary investments. (j) Trading securities. (d) Accounts receivable. (k) Cash. (e) Accounts receivable, a loss if uncollectible. (l) Cash. (f) Other assets if not expendable, cash if ex- (m) Postage expense, or prepaid ex- pendable for goods and services in the for- pense, or office supplies inventory. eign country. (n) Receivable from employee if the (g) Receivable if collection expected within one company is to be reimbursed; year; otherwise, other asset. otherwise, prepaid expense. 3. A compensating balance is that portion of any cash deposit maintained by an enterprise which constitutes support for existing borrowing arrangements with a lending institution. A compensating balance representing a legally restricted deposit held against short-term borrowing arrangements should be stated separately among the cash and cash-equivalent items. A restricted deposit held as a compensating balance against long-term borrowing arrangements should be separately classified as a noncurrent asset in either the investments or other assets section. 9. The percentage-of-sales method. Under this method Bad Debt Expense is debited and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts is credited with a percentage of the current years credit or total sales. The rate is determined by reference to the relationship between prior years credit or total sales and actual bad debts arising therefrom. Consideration should also be given to changes in credit policy and current economic conditions. Although the rate should theoretically be based on and applied to credit sales, the use of total sales is acceptable if the ratio of credit sales to total sales does not vary significantly from year to year. The percentage-of-sales method of providing for estimated uncollectible receivables is intended to charge bad debt expense to the period in which the corresponding sales are recorded and is, therefore, designed for the preparation of a fair income statement. Due to annually insignificant but cumulatively significant errors in the experience rate which may result in either an excessive or inadequate balance in the allowance account, however, this method may not accurately report accounts receivable in the balance sheet at their estimated net realizable value. This can be prevented by periodically reviewing and, if necessary, adjusting the balance in the allowance account. The materiality of any such adjustment would govern its treatment for reporting purposes. The necessity of such adjustments of the allowance account indicates that bad debt expenses have not been accurately matched against related sales. Further, even when the experience rate does not result in an excessive or inadequate balance in the allowance account, this method tends to have a smoothing effect on reported periodic income due to year-to-year differences between the amounts of bad debt write-offs and estimated bad debts. Questions Chapter 7...
View Full Document

Page1 / 12

chapter7homework - CHAPTER 7 Cash and Receivables ANSWERS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online