2610_21 - Late Life Social and Emotional Development...

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1 1 Late Life Social and Emotional Development Professor Mikels 11.18.2009 2 Announcement UPM writing assignment due 11/25 Submitted electronically via Blackboard Discussion Sections on Friday Reaction responses due Thursday, 11/19, by 5PM Carstensen & Mikels (2005): At the Intersection of Emotion and Cognition: The Age-Related Positivity Effect Sullivan et al. (in press). You Never Lose the Ages You’ve Been: Affective Perspective Taking in Older Adults 3 Percentage of the United States Population Over the Age of 65 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 1910 1930 1950 1970 1990 2010 2030
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2 Working Memory Long-term Memory Speed of Processing 4 Negative Aging Trajectory Park et al. (2002) 5 Improved emotion regulation Fewer negative emotional experiences Report greater emotional control Report an increase of positive affect Positive Aging Trajectory Goals are set in temporal contexts Chronological age is associated with time
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This note was uploaded on 12/25/2009 for the course HD 2610 at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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2610_21 - Late Life Social and Emotional Development...

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