HW _9 P2213 F09

HW _9 P2213 F09 - Compare your answers for the electric...

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1 Physics 2213 Homework #9 Fall 2009 Due : the last recitation class of the week of November 2-6. Read: By now we have covered Chapter 21 - Chapter 26. Make sure you have read them. Exercises and Problems (to be handed in) : (1) #24.28 [Capacitor Energy] (2) #23.32 [Metal Sphere Potential] (3) #23.35 [Potential of a Wire] (4) #23.12 [Proton Collision] (5) #23.49 [Two Spheres] Solve parts (a) and (b) only . Add: Graph the potential V(r). (6) #23.85 [Nuclear Fusion in The Sun] (7) #24.8 ["Design-a-Cap"] Please add: (c) Redo your capacitor design with the space between the capacitor filled with polyester. (See Table 24.2.) Give new answers for the questions in parts (a) and (b). (8) Review Example 21.9 (Sec. 21.5) and Example 23.4 (Sec 23.2). For each of the points a, b and c, calculate the electric field using the electric potential obtained at each of those points.
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Unformatted text preview: Compare your answers for the electric fields obtained in the 2 different ways. (9) [Smile!] Capacitors are often used in applications where a short burst of electric current is needed. To power a certain camera's flash lamp, a capacitor must supply a current burst that dissipates a total of 20 J of energy as light and heat in a lamp of resistance 10 Ω . When the lamp is fired, the capacitor is to deliver 95% of its stored energy in a time of 3.0 ms. (a) What should be the capacitance of the capacitor? (b) To what voltage should the capacitor be charged? Could such voltage be obtained directly using typical household batteries? Why or why not? (c) How much charge is on each plate of the capacitor when fully charged? Is this a lot? Why do we not get spectacular lightning bolts from the capacitor?...
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This note was uploaded on 12/25/2009 for the course PHYS 213 at Cornell.

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