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es_100_Lecture_18

es_100_Lecture_18 - Lecture18 Finish Disturbance...

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    Lecture 18 Finish Disturbance
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    Announcements: Regrades midterm 1—must be turned in by Friday and MUST BE WRITTEN OUT. If not written out and justified, they will not be considered. Midterm 2 = Monday Nov. 16 th . Review section for midterm: Friday 10:30- 11:30 . 4 th floor L side of BREN –ES seminar/conf. room in center of floor. My office hrs are changed to Thursday 10- 11:30 to accommodate the wed. holiday.
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    Last lecture: Compared traits of species early in primary versus secondary succession Defined ‘disturbance’ Defined elements of a disturbance regime Began case study of fire disturbance regime in southern California
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    Today… I. Finish case study of fire in so. Cal shrublands II. Disturbance and species richness Intermediate disturbance hypothesis I. Disturbance, productivity and richness
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    Typical TYPE of fire = Crown fire. Typical intensity = High intensity. Typical timing of fire Small fires = Spring, not important. Large = July-October ** Typical return interval (period between fires) SB region: 40-60 yr. Typical size Hard to determine. Debated. Large fires were typical in pre-european times. Characterization of Cal. shrublands fire regime:
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    How do we determine fire return interval  and size in past ? For SB region….. 1. Varve cores in Channel Why must they come from channel? What are some limitations on interpretation of data? 2. Tree core data from survivor trees High elevation conifers preserve fire scars and don’t die Can tell you how often understory burns up Use region wide coring to see whether fires burned in same year.
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    ONLY big fires show up consistently in varve cores Freq. unchanged over last 600 years Mensing et al. 1999, Quaternary Research
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    High elevation chaparral fire regime in Los Padres based on tree rings: Large fires every 30 years with maybe a little longer fire free interval in mid 1900s Work in progress….tree ring lab, U. Arizona, Tucson
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