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35POST3TheMediaLecture14_1__1_

35POST3TheMediaLecture14_1__1_ - The Media >98 of American...

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The Media
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>98% of American homes have at least one television set ¼ of American children ages 0-2 and 1/3 of children ages 2-7 have a TV in their bedroom ¾ of 6 th graders have a TV in their rooms (6% in 1970)
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Parents of 2-7 year olds report watching TV with their kids only some of the time— see tv as the chance to “do other things”
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Children aged 2-11 watch TV an average 22-25 hrs per week 2002 data indicate that more than 10 million children watch TV from 8 to 9 o’clock each evening. By the time a child graduates high school, h/she will have watched TV more than any other single activity except sleep
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Changing Face of media today. Children exposed a multitude of images and messages on a constant basis Television Media multitasking is the norm
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Media usage: TV viewing time shows a steady increase up to age 12/13 As TV watching increases we see a decrease in IQ Active music listening begins around 9-10 Boys spend more time than girls using computers/gaming technology African American teens report greater TV and radio use
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Research finds: exposure to various elements of media influences beliefs, attitudes and behaviors. Messages about gender, race and cultural values are all communicated through the mass media
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Beliefs and attitudes about the real world are influenced by how TV portrays the world In the last 10 years we have seen an increase in exposure to quality television programming (TLC, PBS, DISCOVERY) In last 10 years we have seen an increase in exposure to detrimental sexual and violent content (recent increase in “safer sex”)
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2004 Top shows for girls: Top shows for boys: Younger children are watching adult-oriented shows. Ads for later shows air during “family time”
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Media Images Historically more male vs female characters on TV Review in 1991 found 78% of characters on TV were male and 88% of heroes were men
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1996: Female characters If females are shown:
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