Native American Resistance Article 2 - Native Americans A History of the Sioux By Encyclopaedia Britannica adapted by Newsela staff on 04.18.17 Word

Native American Resistance Article 2 - Native Americans A...

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Native Americans: A History of the Sioux By Encyclopaedia Britannica, adapted by Newsela staff on 04.18.17 Word Count 706 Level 850L A painting of a Sioux war council meeting by George Catlin in 1848. Photo from Wikimedia Commons Among the hundreds of American Indian peoples, the Sioux are perhaps the best known. Several Sioux leaders, including Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse, are among the most famous Native Americans. Today, the Sioux are still one of the largest Indian groups. The Sioux are not a single tribe. They are actually made up of several closely related tribes. The most important of these are the Santee, the Yankton and the Teton. These three tribes are also known as the Dakota Sioux, the Nakota Sioux and the Lakota Sioux, because of the languages they spoke. The Sioux way of life Before the mid-1600s, the Santee Sioux lived in the area around Lake Superior. There they gathered wild rice and other foods, hunted deer and buffalo, and speared fish from canoes.
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Warfare with the Ojibwa tribe eventually drove the Santee into what is now southern and western Minnesota. At the time, that area was the territory of the Teton and Yankton. Then, the Santee forced these two groups from Minnesota into what are now North and South Dakota. This article is available at 5 reading levels at .
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