Bigbook_03 - SECTION 3 Time —— 30 minutes 37 Questions...

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Unformatted text preview: SECTION 3 Time —— 30 minutes 37 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, ‘ ' each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set'of words for €3¢h blank that fit fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. Although the feeding activities of whales and walruses give the seafloor of the Bering Shelf a devastated appearance, these activities seem to be actually -----— to the area, --————- its productivity. (A) destructive. .counterbalancing (B) rehabilitative. .diminishing (C) beneficial. .enhancing (D) detrimental. .redirecting (E) superfluous. .encumbering 2. In an age without radio or recordings, an age —---— by print, fiction gained its greatest ascendancy. (A) decimated (B) denigrated (C) dominated (D) emphasized (E) resurrected 3. Scientists’ pristine reputation as devotees of the disinterested pursuit of truth has been -———- by recent evidence that some scientists have deliberately —-— experimental results to further their own careers. (A) reinforced. .published (B) validated. .suppressed (C) exterminated. .replicated (D) compromised. .fabricated (E) resuscitated. .challenged 4. Although Johnson's and Smith’s initial fascination with the fortunes of those jockeying for power in the law firm —-—- after a few months, the two paid suf- ficient attention to determine who their lunch Dart- ners should be. (A) revived (B) emerged (C) intensified (D) flagged (E) persisted 122 J 5. A war, even if,fought for individualliberty and dem- ocratic rights, usually requires that these principles be ———, for they are ——--- the regimentation and discipline necessary for military efficiency. (A) espoused. .contrary to (B) suppressed. .fulfilled through (C) suspended. .incompatible with (D) followed. .dismptive of (E) rejected. .inherent in 6. To test the —--— of borrowing from one field of study to enrich another, simply investigate the extent to which terms from the one may, without forcing, be --——— the other. (A) risk. .confused with (B) universality. .applied to (C) decorum: .illuminated by (D)'rate. .superseded by (E) efficacy. .utilized by 7. The English novelist William Thackeray considered the cult of the criminal so dangerous that he criti- cized Dickens’ Oliver Twist for making the charac- ters in the thieves’ kitchen so —-—-. ' (A) threatening (B) riveting (C) conniving (D) fearsome (E) irritating ‘ GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE . -- .«nmm . V mug-“Ht... Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. 10. ll. ANIMAL : CAT :: (A) apple : pear (B) club : player (C) furniture : chair (D) landscape: tree (E) body : toe CURTAIN : STAGE :1 (A) footlight : orchestra (B) lid : jar (C) upholstery 2 sofa (D) veil : face ' (E) screen : film INSOMNIA : SLEEP :: (A) dyslexia : read (B) hemophilia : bleed (C) hyperactivity : move (D) paranoia : hallucinate (E) malnutrition : eat JEER : DERISION :: (A) fidget : restraint (B) cowerzmenace (C) slouch : vigilance (D) reprimand: censure (E) frownzadversity 3 123 12. l3. 14. 15. HUMILITY : SUPPLICANT :: (A) espionage : felon (B) dilettantism : connoisseur (C) dogmatism '. scholar (D) gregariousness : teammate (E) resistance : adversary INTEREST : INVEIGLE :: (A) evaluate : suggest (B) foresee: predict (C) plan : scheme (D) interpret : examine (E) neglect: persecute BARTER : COMMODITIES :: (A) arbitrate : disputes (B) invade:boundaries (C) debatezissues (D) correspond : letters (E) promote : ranks PARRY : QUESTION :: (A) retumraffection (B) shirk : duty ' (C) confrontcdread (D) hurl : insult (E) surrender : temptation. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. line {5) {10) (15) (20) (25) {30) (35) (40) '(This passage is excerpted from an article that was pub- Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. Unless smokers are consistently located near more hos- pitable warm-water vents, chemosynthesis can account for only a fraction of the vent faunas. It is conceivable. however, that these large, sedentary organisms do in fa lished in 1981.) The deep sea typically has a sparse fauna dominated by [my worms and crustaceans with an even sparser dis_ (45) feed on bacteria that grow in warm—water vents, rise in . . . ’ the vent water, and then rain in peripheral areas to non iggugge: 1:; a: ammsli'hggfizg’l $§2§§Jg§§mal ish animals living some distance from the wann-water ’ occa . . . vents. 30m srbtengpezn mgrmg‘gfimarkab‘e densmcs Of Nonetheless, advection is a more likely alternative “assailapjs; 3211:5121), gr‘food on particulate V (50) food source. Research has demonstrated that advective . . . . ‘ 'flow, which originates near the surface of the ocean Patterbul‘flmglyfdggfd {Eggnnzhomsyntgisfi’tgéhgge where suspended particulate matter accumulates, trans- 13"; 3e; zé’mIEugmes ufgvjevcr m: ‘5pr many films ports some of that matter and water to’the vents. Esti- thegordinary fallout The first reports descxibing'vent' matcs-suEgcst .that for every nib“: meter of.vem d'sf faunas proposed two possible sources of nutrition: bac- (55) Chargc’ 350 "1"“?th ogpmculate orgamcfmatcnal ten'al chemosynthesis, production of food by bacteria ’ :12? 2:33:12? gaggiuizcgfigea‘rgagi’ rsgrin‘han using energy derived from chemical changes, and advec- 30 “gyms of pétcmm food per day In addition it i‘ nor.“ as“: 1:32;an fiefsgcdignxmaigfqfijfigusgrim likely that small live animals in the advected water migl' reglon ‘ ’ V1 ppo (60) be killed or stunned by thermal and/or chemical shock, local chemosynthesis was accumulated: hydrogen sul- fide was found in vent water; many vent-site bacteria were found to be capable of chemosynthesis; and ex- tremely large concentrations of bacteria were found in samples of vent water thought to be pure. This final observation seemed decisive. ,If such astonishing concen- trations of bacteria were typical of vent outflow. then food within the vent would dwarf any contribution from advection. Hence, the widely quoted conclusion was reached that bacterial chemosynthesis provides the foun- dation for hydrothermal-vent food chains—an exciting prospect because no other communities on Earth are independent of photosynthesis. There are, however, certain difficulties with this inter- pretation. For example, some of the large sedentary organisms associated with vents are also found at ordi- nary deep-sea temperatures many meters from the nearest hydrothermal sources. This suggests that bacte- rial chcmosynthesis is not a sufficient source of nutrition for these creatures. Another difficulty is that similarly dense populations of large deep-sea animals have been found in the proximity of “smokers"—vents where water emerges at temperatures up to 350° C. No bacteria can survive such heat, and no bacteria were found there. thereby contributing to the food supply of vents. 16. The passage provides information for answering which of the following questions? (A) What causes warm-water vents to form? (B) Do vent faunas consume more than do deep-s: faunas of similar size? (C) Do bacteria live in the vent water of smokers? .(D) What role does hydrogen sulfide play in chemosynthesis? . (E) What accounts for the locations of deep-sea smokers? GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGl l24 l7. l8. [9. The information in the passage suggests that the 20. majority of deep-sea faunas that live in nonvent habitats have which of the following characteristics? (A) They do not normally feed on particles of food in the water. ~ (B) They are smaller than many vent faunas. (C) They are predators. (D) They derive nutrition from a chemosynthetic food source. - (E) They congregate around a single main food source. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) describe a previously unknown natural phenomenon (B) reconstruct the evolution ofa natural phenomenon V 7 21, (C) establish unequivocally the accuracy of a hypothesis (D) survey explanations for a natural phenomenon and determine which is best supported by evidence (E) entertain criticism of the author’s research and provide an effective response Which of the following does the author cite as a weakness in the argument that bacterial chemosyn- thesis provides the foundation for the food chains at deep-sea vents? 77(A) Vents are colonized by some of the same ani- 22. ma(ls found in other areas of the ocean floor. (B) Vent water does not contain sufficient quanti- ties of hydrogen sulfide. I (C) Bacteria cannot produce large quantities of food quickly enough. (D) Large concentrations of minerals are found in vent water. (E) Some bacteria found in the vents are incapable of chemosynthesis. 125 Which of the following is information supplied in the passage that would support the statement that the food supplies necessary to sustain vent commu- nities must be many times that of ordinary fallout? I. Large vent faunas move from vent to vent in search of food. II. Vent faunas ar'énot able to consume food pro- duced by photosynthesis. III. Vents are more densely populated than are other deep—sea areas. (A) Ionly (B) III only (C) _I and II only (D) II and III only (E) I, II, and III The author refers to “smokers” (line 38) most prob- ably in order to ‘ (A) show how thermal shock can provide food for some vent faunas by stunning small animals (B) prove that the habitat of most deep-sea animals is limited to warm-water vents (C) explain how bacteria carry out chemosynthesis (D) demonstrate how advection compensates for the lack of food sources on the seafloor (E) present evidence that bacterial chemosynthesis may be an inadequate source of food for some vent faunas Which of the-following can be inferred from the pass sage about the particulate matter that is carried down from the surface of the ocean? (A) "It is the basis of bacterial chemosynthesis irr the vents. ' V (B) It may provide an important source of nutrition for vent faunas. ' (C); It may came the internal tempera ture of the. V . vents to change significantly. ‘ (D) It is transported as large aggregates of particles. (E) It contains hydrogen sulfide. ' GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. _ Line (5) (10) ([5) Throughout human history there have been many stringent taboos concerning watching other people eat or eating in the presence of others. There have been attempts to explain these taboos in terms of inappropri- ate Social relationships either between those who ‘ are involved and those who are not simultaneously involved in the satisfaction of a bodily need, or between those already satiated and those who appear to be shamelessly gorging. Undoubtedly such elements exist in the taboos, but there is an additional element with a much more fundamental importance. In pre- historic times, when food was so precious and the on-lookers so hungry, not to offer half of the little food one had was unthinkable, since every glance was a plea for life. Further, during those times, people existed in nuclear or extended family groups, and the sharing of food was quite literally supporting one’s family or, by extension, preserving one’s self. 23. If the argument in the passage is valid, taboos against eating in the presence of others who are not also eating would be LEAST likely in a society that (A) had always had a plentiful supply of food (B) emphasized the need to share worldly goods (C) had a nomadic rather than an agricultural way of life (D) emphasized the value of privacy (E) ' discouraged overindulgence The author’s hypothesis concerning the origin of taboos against watching other peOple eat empha- si2es the 24. (A) general palatability of food (B) religious significance of food (C) limited availability of food (D) various sources of food (E) nutritional value of food 126 1 According to the passage, the author believes that. past attempts to explain some taboos concerning eating are ' ' » (A) unimaginative ‘ (B) implausible (C) inelegant (D) incomplete (E) unclear 26. In developing the main idea of the passage, the author does which of the following? (A) Downplays earlier attempts to explain the origins ofa social prohibition. J: '(B) Adapts a scientific theory and applies it to a spiritual relationship. . (C) Simplifies a complex biological phenomenon by ‘ explaining it in terms of social needs. (D) Reorganizes a system designed to guide per- sonal behavior. (E) Codifies earlier, unsystematized conjectures about family life. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists ofa word 33. STEEP: (A) relax (B) repulse printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words (C) plummet (D) clarify (E) parch or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is lrgtqisnearly opposne in meaning to the word in capital 34' RECUMBENT: (A) we“ fortified - ~ (B) standing up (C) lacking flexibility Since some of the questions require you to distinguish (D) constricted (E) alarmed fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the . . . . h . ' ch01ces before deCiding whic one is best 35’ NATTY: (A) sloppy (B) quiet (C) loose (D) common (E) difficult 27. CONSOLIDATION: (A) instigation (B) fragmentation (C) restriction 36 EXIGENT . . . . i .. . . : (A) unprepossessmg (B) inquisitive (D) °PP°51“°“ (E) Provoca‘m“ » (C) devoted (D) absurd (E) deferrable 28. SECURE: (A) infest (B) unearth 37 (C) impart (D) implant (E) unfasten ' PLATITUDE: (A) concise formulation (B) original observation 29. FRACAS: (A) rapture (B) relic ‘ (C) unsubstantiated claim (C) novel predicament (D) peaceful situation (D) relevant concern (E) just reward (E) insincere remark 30. GRATE: (A) soothe (B) gather (C) acknowledge (D) forgive (E) improve 31. HYPERBOLE: (A) equivocation (B) criticism (C) understatement (D) pessimism (E) skepticism 32, INERRANCY: (A) productivity (B) generosity (C) volubility (D) fallibility (E) plausibility c 127 Time—~30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that b‘es_t fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. The discovery that, friction excluded, all bodies fall at the same rate is so simple to state and to grasp that there is a tendency to ---.--—- its significance. (A) under-rate (B) control (C) reassess (D) praise (E) eliminate 2. Their mutual teasing seemed ---~——, but in fact it —-—-— a long-standing hostility. I (A) aimless. .produced (B) friendly. .masked ' (C) playful. ,contravened (D) bitter. .revealed (E) ‘ clever. .averted 3. Noting that few employees showed any -———-- for ' complying with the corporation’s new safety regula- tions, Peterson-Was forced to conclude that accep- tance of the regulations would be —-————, at best. (A) aptitude. .unavoidable (B) regard. .indeterminate (C) respect. .negotiable (D) patience. .imminent (E) enthusiasm. .grudging 4. It has been argued that politics as --~——-, whatever its transcendental claims, has always been the sys- tematic organization of common hatreds. (A) a theory (B) an ideal (C) a practice (D) a contest (E) an enigma 134 5. In many science fiction films, the opposition of good and evil is portrayed as a -— between technology, which is ———---, and the errant will of a depraved intellectual. (A) fusion. .useful (B) struggle. .dehurnania‘ng (C)- parallel. .unfettered (D) conflict. .beneficent — (E) similarity. .malevolent . Although scientists claim that the seemingly _—-- language of their reports is more precise than the figurative language of fiction, the language of science, like all language, is inherently ---- ~-. (A) ornamental. .subtle (B) unidimensional. .unintelligible (C) symbolic. .complex (D) literal. .allusive (E) subjective. .metaphorical . In recent decades the idea that Cezanne influenced Cubism has been caught in the ——--——- between art historians who credit Braque with its invention and those who —--- Picasso. (A) crossfire. .tout (B) interplay. .advocate (C) paradox. .prefer (D) deliberation. .attribute (E) tussle. .substitute GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the following questions, a related 13. CARET : INSER’I'ION :: pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs (A) pound : heaviness of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best (B) tongs : extraction expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the (C) comma : pause original pair. ‘ 8. DISGUISE : IDENTIFICATION}: ’ 10. 11. (A) equivocation : ambiguity (B) facade : decoration (C) forgery : wealth (D) camouflage 2 detection (E) manipulation : advantage BIRD : FEA'I'HERS :: (A) mammal : spine * (B) hand : fingers (C) branch : fruit (D) limb : fur (E) fish : scales ELBOW : JOINT :2 (A) cell : tissue (B) corpuscle : blood (C) muscle : bone (D) skull : skeleton (E) ‘heart : organ ENDOW : INCOME :: (A) emit 2 signals (B)g endorse :rapproval (C) enchantzmagic (D) embarkzvoyage (E) endure: hardships BOMBAST : POMPOUS :: (A) prose : economical (B) circumlocution : patient (C) prattle : succinct (D) verbiage 2 mundane (E) tirade : critical 135 14. 15. 16. (D) quotation : agreement (E) clipzattachment OPAQUE : LIGHT :: (A) inaudible : sound (B) unbreakable : plastic (C) reflective:mirror (D) nonporous: liquid (E) viscouszfluid FEARLESS : DAUNT :: (A) perplexed : enlighten (B) nondescript : neglect (C) avaricious : motivate (D) impassive : perturb (E) tranquil : pacify QUERULOUS : COMPLAIN :: (A) humble : fawn (B) prodigal: spend (C) treacherous: trust (D) laconic: talk (E) culpable: blame GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. LME ('5) Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its cdntent. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. ‘ (This passage is from a book published in 1975) That Louise Nevelson is believed by many critics to be the greatest twentieth-century sculptor is all the more remarkable because the greatest resistance to women artists has been, until recently, in the field of sculpture. Since Neolithic times, sculpture has been con— sidered the prerogative of men, partly, perhaps, for purely physical reasons: it was erroneously assumed , that women were not suited for the hard manual labor (10) (15) (20) (25} (30) (35) (40) (45) ISO) required in sculpting stone, carving wood, or working in metal. It has been only during the twentieth century that women sculptors have been recognized as major artists, and it has been in the United States, especially since the decades of the fifties and sixties, that women sculptors have shown the greatest originality and creative power. Their rise to prominence parallels the development of sculpture itself in the United States: while there had been a few talented sculptors in the United States before the 1940's, it was only after l945—when New York Was rapidly becoming the art capital of the world—that major sculpture was produced in the United States. Some of the best was the work of women. By far the most outstanding of these women is Louise Nevelson, who in the eyes of many critics is the most original female artist alive today. One famous and influ- ential critic, Hilton Kramer, said of her work, “For myself, I think Ms. Nevelson succeeds where the painters often fail." Her works have been compared to the Cubist con- structions of Picasso, the Surrealistic objects of Miro, and the Merzbau of Schwitters. Nevelson would be the first to admit that she has been influenced by all of these, as well as by African sculpture, and by Native American and pre-Columbian art, but she has absorbed all these influences and still created a distinctive art that expresses the urban landscape and the aesthetic sensibil- ity of the twentieth century. Nevelson says, “I have always wanted to show the world that art is everywhere, except that it has to pass through a creative mind." Using mostly discarded wooden objects like packing crates, broken pieces of furniture, and abandoned archi- tectural ornaments, all of which she has hoarded for years, she assembles architectural constructions of great beauty and power. Creating very freely with no sketches, she glues and nails objects together, paints them black, or more rarely white or gold, and places them in boxes. These assemblages, walls. even entire environments cre- ate a mysterious. almost awe-inspiring atmosphere. Although she has denied any symbolic or religious intent in her works. their three-dimensional grandeur and even their titles. such as Sky Cathedral and Night Cathedral, suggest such connotations. In some ways. her most ambitious works are closer to architecture than to tradi- tional sculpture. but then neither Louise Nevelson nor her art fits into any neat category. 136 17. The passage focuses primarily on which of the 18. 19. following? (A) A general tendency in twentieth«century art (B) The work of a particular artist (C) The artistic influences on women sculptors (D) Critical responses to twentieth-century sculpture (E) Materials used by twentieth-century sculptors Which of the following statements is supported by information given in the passage? (A) Since 1945 women sculptors in the United States have produced more sculpture than have men sculptors. I (B) Since 1950 sculpture produced in the United States has been the most original and creative sculpture produced anywhere. ' (C) From 1900 to 1950 women sculptors in Europe enjoyed more recognition for their work than did women sculptors in the United States. (D) Prior to 1945 there were many women sculptors whose work was ignored by Critics. (E) Prior to 1945 there was little major sculpture produced by men or women sculptors work- ing in the United States. The author quotes Hilton Kramer in lines 25-27 most probably in order to illustrate which of the following? (A) The realism of Nevelson’s work (B) The unique qualities of Nevelson‘s style (C) The extent of critical approval of Nevelson’s work (D) A distinction between sculpture and painting (E) A reason for the prominence of women sculp— tors since the 1950’s GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 20. Which of the following is one way in which Nevel- 21. son’s art illustrates her theory as it is expressed in lines 36—38 ? (A) She sculpts in wood rather than in metal or stone. (B) She paints her sculptures and frames them in boxes. (C) She makes no preliminary sketches but rather allows the sculpture to develop as she works. (D) She puts together pieces of ordinary objects once used for different purposes to make her sculptures. (E) She does not deliberately attempt to convey symbolic or religious meanings through her sculpture. It can be inferred from the passage that the author believes which of the following about Nevelson’s sculptures? (A) They suggest religious and symbolic meanings. (B) They do not have qualities characteristic of sculpture. (C) They are mysterious and awe-inspiring, but not beautiful. (D) They are uniquely American in style and sensi— bility. (E) They show the influence of twentieth—century architecture. 137 22 . The author regards Nevelson's stature in the an world as “remarkable” (line 3) in part because of which of the following? (A) Her work is currently overrated. (B) Women sculptors have found it especially diff- cult to be accepted and recognized as major artists. - (C) Nevelson’s sculptures are difficult to under- stand. (D) Many art critics have favored painting over sculpture in writing about developments in the art world. (E) Few of the artists prominent in the twentieth century have been sculptors. . Which of the following statements about Nevelson’s sculptures can be inferred from the passage? (A) They are meant for display outdoors. (B) They are often painted in several colors. (C) They are sometimes very large. (D) They are hand carved by Nevelson. (E) They are built around a central wooden object. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Line (5) (10) (I5) Volcanic rock that forms as fluid lava chills rapidly is called pillow lava. This rapid chilling occurs when lava erupts directly into water (or beneath ice) or when it flows across a shoreline and into a body of water. While the term “pillow lava" suggests a definite shape, in fact geologists disagree. Some geologists argue that pillow lava is characterized by discrete, ellipsoidal masses. Oth- ers describe pillow lava as a tangled mass of cylindrical, interconnected flow lobes. Much of this controversy probably results from unwarranted extrapolations of the original configuration of pillow flows from two— dimensional cross sections of eroded pillows in land outcroppings. Virtually any cross section cut through a tangled mass of interconnected flow lobes would give the appearance of a pile of discrete ellipsoidal masses. Adequate three-dimensional images of intact pillows are essential for defining the true geometry of pillowed flows and thus ascertaining their mode of origin. Indeed, the term “pillow,” itself suggestive of discrete masses, is probably a misnomer. 24. Which of the following is a fact presented in the passage? (A) The shape of the connections between the sepa- rate, sacklike masses in pillow lava is unknown. ‘ (B) More accurate cross sections of pillow lava would reveal the mode of origin. (C) Water or ice is necessary for the formation of pillow lava. (D) No three-dimensional examples of intact pillows currently exist. (E) The origin of pillow lava is n0t yet known. 25. In the passage, the author is primarily interested in (A) analyzing the source of a scientific controversy (B) criticizing some geologists’ methodology (C) pointing out the flaws in a geological study (D) proposing a new theory to explain existing sci- entific evidence (E) describing a physical phenomenon 138 26. The author of the passage would most probably agree that the geologists mentioned in line 6 (“Some » geologists") have made which of the following errors in reasoning? ' I. Generalized unjustifiably from available evidence. " II. Deliberater ignored existing counterevidence. III. Repeatedly failed to take new evidence into account. (A) Ionly (B) II only (D) I and II only (C) III only (E) II and III only 27. The author implies that the “controversy” (line 9) might be resolved if (A) geologists did not persist in using the term “pil- low” ‘ (B) geologists did not rely on potentially misleading information (C) geologists were more willing to confer direct] with one another ‘ (D) two-dimensional cross sections of eroded pil- lows were available (E) existing pillows in land ontcroppings were not so badly eroded GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. PEER: (A) a complicated structure (B) an insignificant explanation (C) a subordinate person (D) an inept musician (E) an unreliable worker SYNCHRONOUS: (A). unusual in appearance (B) of a distinct origin (C) occurring at different. times (D) monotonous (E) shapeless ALIENATE: (A) reunite (C) relieve (D) match (B) influence (E) revitalize PREDESTINE: (A) jumble (B) doubt (C) leave to chance (D) arrange incorrectly (E) defy authority AERATE: (A) generate (B) create (C) elevate (D) combine water with (E) remove air from 139 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. FALLOW: (A) abundant (C) necessary (D) in use (B) valuable (E) in demand CORROBORATE: (A) tire (C) deny (D) antagonize (B) rival (E) disengage PERUSE: (A) glide along (C) strive for (D) pick up (B) argue against (E) glance at SEEMLY: (A) indecorous (B) inapparent (C) disconnected (D) disingenuous (E) deleterious TENUOUS: (A) substantial (C) permanent (B) obdurate (D) ubiquitous (E) intelligible GRA’IUITOUS: (A) thankless (B) warranted (C) trying (D) discreet (E) spurious FOR GENERAL TEST 3 ONLY Answer Key and Percentages“ of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly VERBAL ABILITY QUANTITATIVE ABILITY ANALYTICAL ABILITY Section 3 Section 5 Section 2 1 Section 6 Section 1 1 Section 4 Numner Answer Number Answer Number Answer P+ : Number Answer Number Answer P+ 1 Numner Answer 1 C 1 ‘ A 89 A A B 1 O 2 C 2 8 82 A C C 2 A 3 D 3 E 56 8 B B 3 D 4 D 4 C 55 A D E 4 E 5 C 5 D 45 C A E 5 A 6 E 6 D 42 B B E 5 C 7 B 7 A 49 D A D 7 C 8 C 8 D 36 D D C a a 9 D 9 E 91 A C D 9 C 10 A 10 E 75 8 D A 10 D 11 D 11 B 52 - D D C 11 C 12 E 12 E 4-4 C C B 12 E 13 C 34 1 C 4 D B 8 13 D 14 D 28 14 D 32 C C E 14 D 15 B 31 15 D 28 A A 8 1 E 16 C 53 16 B 29 C B E 16 D 17 B 26 17 B 82 E C A 17 E 18 D 75 1 E 57 D C E 1 D 19 A 50 19 C i 54 A E E 1 C 20 ‘3 56 20 D 68 a E r 0 20 A 21 E 58 21 A 55 C r 3 B 21 a 22 B 70 22 8 89 C D E 22 C 23 A 70 23 C 61 B C D 23 B 24 C B4 24 C 7 B . E B 24 A 25 D 66 25 A 47 A A A 25 E 26 A 40 26 A E A O 27 8 35 27 B 4 C B 23 E 37 28 c as A V D 29 D 79 29 C 90 D D 30 A 78 30 A 31 E A 31 C 70 31 C 81 32 D 54 32 E 72 33 E 32 33 D 37 34 B 33 34 C 37 35 A 24 35 E 37 36 E 22 36 A 27 37 B 22 37 A 24 38 B ’Estimated P+ for the group of examinees who took the GRE General Test in a recent (mes-year penod. ' 147 ...
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Bigbook_03 - SECTION 3 Time —— 30 minutes 37 Questions...

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