Bigbook_05 - SECTION 2 Time— 30 minutes 38 Questions...

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Unformatted text preview: SECTION 2 Time— 30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a Whole. 1. Heavily perfumed white flowers, such as gardenias, were favorites with collectors in the eighteenth cen- tury, when ----- —- was valued much more highly than it is today. (A) scent (B) beauty (C) elegance (D) color (E) variety l‘u In a most impressive demonstration, Pavarotti sailed through Verdi’s “Celeste Aida," normally a tenor’s -----—-, with the casual enthusiasm of a folk singer performing one of his favorite —-----. (B) glory. .chorales (D) delight. .chanteys (A) pitfall. .recitals (C) nightmare. .ballads (E) routine. .composers 3. Dependence on foreign sources of heavy metals, though ----- --. remains ----- -- for United States for- eign policy. (A) deepening. .a challenge (B) diminishing. .a problem (C) excessive. .a dilemma (D) debilitating. .an embarrassment (E) unavoidable. .a precedent 4. Cynics believe that people who -——-- compliments do so in order to be praised twice. (A) bask in (B) give out (C) despair of (D) gloat over (E) shrug off 195 5. Although nothing could be further from the truth. freight railroads have been ----- -- of ----- -- the nation’s shift from oil to coal by charging exorbi- tant fees to transport coal. (A) accused. .impeding (B) proud. .accelerating (C) guilty. .delaying (D) conscious. .contributing to (E) wary. .interfering with Although the revelation that one of the contestants was a friend left the judge open to charges of lack of ----- —-, the judge remained adamant in her asser- tion that acquaintance did not necessarily imply ----- -—. (A) prudence. .tolerance (B) detachment. foreknowledge (C) exoneration. .imprOpriety (D) prejudice. .preference (E) disinterestedness. .partiality Within the next decade, sophisticated telescopes now orbiting the Earth will determine whether the continents really are moving. ---- —- the incipient ----- -- among geologists about the validity of the theory of continental drift. (A) obviating. .consensus (B) forestalling..rift ‘ (C) escalating. .debates (D) engendering. .speculation (E) resolving. .rumors GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. I 8. 10. 11. 12. ‘CREASE : FOLDING 2: PEDIATRICS : CHILDREN :: r (A) dermatology : skin (B) pathology : medicine (C) meteorology : forecasts (D) neurology : psychologists (E) ecology : environmentalists (A) serration : braiding (C) dentzweakening (E) gougezcracking (B) hole : perforating (D) break: setting DAGGER : SCABBARD :: (A) bow : quiver (B) pistol : holster (C) lasso : saddle (D) rifle : sight (E) spear: shaft SUBPOENA : WITNESS :: (A) subom : judge (B) taxzworker (C) elect : officer (D) conscript : soldier (E) hire: laborer LUBRICATE : ABRASION :: (A) bumish : decomposition (B) vent: distillation (C) tampzadhesion (D) seal : leakage (E) irrigate : drainage 196 l3. 14. 15. 16. ASTROLOGY : ASTRONOMY :: (A) alehemy:ehemistry (B) homeopathy : zoology (C) vmythology : classics (D) pedagogy : philosophy (E) phenomenology11inguistics MALAPROPISM : VERBAL :: (A) heresyzmoral (B) hoax:eognitive (C) gaffe : social (D) feintzmartial (E) perjury: legislative PLUCK : QUIT :: (A) verve : flinch (B) gall : skimp (C) pride 2 grove] (D) charm : smile (E) poise : waver PARENTHESIS : EXPLANATION :: (A) synopsis:affectation (B) apostrophe:annotation (C) synthesis : interpolation (D) ellipsis : omission (E) asteriskzexaggeration GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose [[13 best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or im lied in [hat passage. The use of heat pumps has been held back largely by skepticism about advertisers’ claims that heat pumps can provide as many as two units of thermal energy for each unit of electrical energy used, thus apparently contradicting the principle of energy conservation. Heat pumps circulate a fluid refrigerant that cycles alternatively from its liquid phase to its vapor phase in a closed loop. The refrigerant, starting as a low-temperature, low-pressure vapor, enters a compressor driven by an electric motor. The refrigerant leaves the compressor as a hot, dense vapor and flows through a heat exchanger called the condenser, which transfers heat from the refrigerant to a body of air. Now the refrigerant. as a high-pressure, cooled liquid. confronts a flow restriction which causes the pressure to drop. As the pressure falls, the refrigerant expands and par- tially vaporizes, becoming chilled. It then passes through a second heat exchanger, the evaporator, which transfers heat from the air to the refrigerant, reducing the temperature ofthis second body of air. Of the two heat exchangers, one is located inside, and the other one outside the house, so each is in contact with a different body of air: room air and outside air, respectively. The flow direction of refrigerant through a heat pump is controlled by valves. When the refrigerant flow is reversed, the heat exchangers switch func- tion. This flow-reversal capability allows heat pumps either to heat or cool room air. ’ Now. if under certain conditions a heat pump puts out more thermal energy than it consumes in electrical energy, has the law of energy conserva- tion been challenged? No, not even remotely: the additional input of thermal energy into the circu- lating refrigerant via the evaporator accounts for the difference in the energy equation. Unfortunately, there is one real problem. The (40) heating capacity of a heat pump decreases as the outdoor temperature falls. The drop in capacity is caused by the lessening amount of refrigerant mass moved through the compressor at one time. The heating capacity is proportional to this mass flow rate: the less the mass of refrigerant being com— pressed, the less the thermal load it can transfer through the heat-pump cycle. The volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor through the single-speed rotary compressor used in heat pumps is approxi- mately constant. But cold refrigerant vapor enter- ing a compressor is at lower pressure than warmer vapor. Therefore, the mass of cold refrigerant— and thus the thermal energy it carries—is less than (5) (10) (is) (20) (25) (30) (35) (45) (50) 197 if the refrigerant vapor were warmer before com- (55) pression. Here, then, lies a genuine drawback of heat pumps: in extremely cold climates—where the most heat is needed—heat pumps are least able to supply enough heat. 17. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) explain the differences in the working of a heat pump when the outdoor temperature changes (B) contrast the heating and the cooling modes of heat pumps * (C) describe heat pumps, their use, and factors affecting their use - (D) advocate the more widespread use of heat pumps (E) expose extravagant claims about heat pumps as false 18. The author resolves the question of whether heat pumps run counter to the principle of energy con‘ servation by ‘ (A) carefully quaiifying the meaning of that prin- ciple (B) pointing out a factual error in the statement that gives rise to this question (C) supplying additional relevant facts (D) denying the relevance of that principle to heat pumps " (E) explaining that heat pumps can cool, as well as heat, room air GO ONTO THE NEXT PAGE. 19. 20. 21. It can be inferred from the passage that, in the course of a heating season, the‘heating capacity of a heat pump is greatest when (A) heating is least essential (B) electricity rates are lowest (C) its compressor runs the faStest (D) outdoor temperatures hold steady (E) the heating demand surges If the author‘s assessment of the use of heat pumps (lines 1-6) is correct, which of the following best expresses the lesson that advertisers should learn from this case? (A) Do not make exaggerated claimsabout the A products you are trying to promote. (B) Focus your advertising campaign on vague analogies and veiled implications instead of on facts. (C) Do not use facts in your advertising that will strain the prospective client‘s ability to believe. (D) Do not assume in your advertising that the prospective clients know even the most ele— mentary scientific principles. (E) Concentrate your advertising firmly on finan- cially relevant issues such as price discounts and efficiency of operation. The passage suggests that heat pumps would be used more widely if (A) they could also be used as air conditioners (B) they could be moved around to supply heat where it is most needed (C) their heat output could be thermostatically con— trolled (D) models with truly superior cooling capacity were advertised more effectively (E) people appreciated the role of the evaporator in the energy equation 198 22. According to the passage, the role of the flow 23. restriction (lines 16—17) in a heat pump is to (A) measure accurately the flow rate of the refriger- ant mass at that point (B) compress and heat the refrigerant vapor (C) bring about the evaporation and cooling of refrigerant Q .1? (D) exchange heat betweenthe refrigerant and the air at that point (E) . reverse the direction of refrigerant flow when needed The author regards the notion that heat pumps have a genuine drawback as a (A) causa for regret (B) sign of premature defeatism (C) welcome challenge (D) case of sloppy thinking (E) focus for an educational campaign 00 ON 'To THE NEXT PAGE. All of Francoise Duparc's surviving paintings blend portraiture and genre. Her subjects appear to be acquain— tances whom she has asked to pose; she has captured both their self—consciousness and the spontaneity of their everyday activities, the depiction ofwhich characterizes genre painting. But genre painting, especially when it Bortrayed members of the humblest classes. was never bopular in eighteenth~century France. The Le Nain brothers and Georges de La Tour, who also chose such themes, were largely ignOred. Their present high standing is due to a different, more democratic political climate and to different aesthetic values: we no longer require artists to provide ideal images of humanity for our moral edification but rather regard such idealization as a falsifi- cation of the truth. Duparc gives no improving message and discreetly refrains from judging her subjects. In brief. her works neither elevate nor instruct. This restraint largely explains her lack of popular success during her lifetime, even if her talent did not go completely unrecog- nized by her eighteenth-century French contemporaries. 24. According to the passage, modern viewers are not likely to value which of the following qualities in a painting? (A) The technical elements ofthe painting (B) The spontaneity of the painting (C) The moral lesson imparted by the painting (D) The degree to which the painting realistically depicts its subject (E) The degree to which the artist’s personality is revealed in the painting 25. Ifthe history of Duparc's artistic reputation Were to follow that of the Le Nain brothers and Georges de La Tour, present-day assessments of her work would be likely to contain which of the following? (A) An evaluation that accords high status to her work (8) Acknowledgement of her technical expertise but dismissal of her subject matter as trivial (C) Agreement with assessments made in her own time but acknowledgements of the excep- tional quality ofa few of her paintings (D) Placement of her among the foremost artists of her century (E) A reclassification of her work as portraiture rather than genre painting 26. It can be inferred from the passage that the term 199 “genre painting" would most likely apply to which of the following? (A) A painting depicting a glorious moment of vic- tory following a battle (B) A painting illustrating a narrative from the Bible (C) A portrayal ofa mythological Greek goddess (D) A portrayal of a servant engaged in his work (E) A formal portrait of an eighteenthwcentury king r , The argument of the passage best supports which of the following contentions concerning judgments of artistic work? (A) Aesthetic judgments can be influenced by the political beliefs of those making the judg- ment. (B) Judgments ofthe value of an artist’s work made by his or her contemporaries must be discounted before a true judgment can be made. (C) Modern aesthetic taste is once again moving in the direction of regarding idealistic painting as the most desirable form of painting. (D) In order to be highly regarded, an artist cannot be solely identified with one particular kind of painting. (E) Spontaneity is the most valuable quality a por trait painter can have. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. TURBULENCE: (A) moderation (B) tranquillity (C) immunity ‘ (D) correlation (E) meditation 29. DEHYDRATE : (A) make soluble (B) separate electrolytically (C) combine with oxygen (D) saturate with water (E) expose to hydrogen LOLL: (A) comply readily (B) move vigorously (C) describe exactly (D) notice incidentally (E) insist strongly 30. 31. INTREPID: (A) morbid (C) temperate (D) apprehensive (B) forbearing (E) abundant 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. PRECURSORY: (A) derivative (B) ephemeral (C) original (D) essential (E) solid (B) latent (E) fleeting PERENNIAL: (A) predictable (C) engrossing (D) infertile DISPARATE: (A) homogeneous (B) cumulative (C) invariable (D) cooperative (E) cogent FULMINATION: (A) repetition (B) addition (C) ratification (D) praise (E) escape EBULLIENCE: (A) confusion (B) pretension (C) introspection (D) absentmindedness (E) impassiveness PREDILECTION: (A) unwillingness to choose (B) desire to please (C) ambiguity (D) stereotype (E) propensity to dislike BANAL: (A) faithful (C) inclined (B) arresting . (D) forced (E) elaborate SECTION 4 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words 01' sets of words. Choose-the word or set of words for each blank thatfl fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. - l. The commission criticized the legislature for mak- ing college attendance dependent on the ability to Pay, Charging that, as a result, hundreds of quali- fied young people would be ——-— further educa- tion. (A) entitled to (B) striving for (C) deprived of (D) uninterested in (E) participating in ‘ 2. In most Native American cultures, an article used in prayer or ritual is made with extraordinary atten- tion to and richness of detail: it is decorated more —---- than a similar article intended for ----- -- use. (A) delicately. .vocational (B) colorfully. .festive (C) creatively. .religious (D) subtly. .commercial (E) lavishly; .everyday 3. Having no sense of moral obligation, Shipler was as little subject to the ----- -- of conscience after he acted as he was motivated by its ----- -- before he acted. (A) rewards. .chastisement (B) balm. .eloquence (C) reproaches. .promptings (D) ridicule. .allure (E) qualms. .atonement 208 4. Freud derived psychoanalytic knowledge of child- hood indirectly: he ----- childhood processes from adult ----- --. (A) reconstructed. .memory (B) condoned. .experience (C) incorporated. .behavior (D) released. .monotony (E) inferred. .anticipation 5. While she initially suffered the fate of many pio- neers—the incomprehension of her colleagues~— octogenarian Nobel laureate Barbara McClintock has lived to —--- the triumph of her once ------- _ scientific theories. (A) descry. .innovative (B) regret. .insignificant (C) perpetuate. .tentative (D) enjoy. .authoritative (E) savor. .heterodox 6. Broadway audiences have become inured to --—-- and so -—-——- to be pleased as to make their ready Ovations meaningless as an indicator. of the quality of the production before them. (A) sentimentality. .reluctant (B) condescension. .disinclined (C) histrionics. .unlikely (D) cleverness. .eager (E) mediocrity. .desperate 7. Any language is a conspiracy against experience in the sense that it is a collective attempt to ----- -- experience by reducing it into discrete parcels. ‘ (B) transcribe (E) manage (A) extrapolate (D) amplify (C) complicate GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. CENSUS '. POPULATION :: (A) itinerary : journeys (B) inventory : merchandise (C) roster : audience (D) slate : incumbents (E) manifest : debts 9. INEVITABLE : CHANCE :: (A) absolute : variability (B) candid : openness (C) certain : regularity (D) relaxed : diligence (E) sincere : hesitancy lO. DART : MISSILE :: (A) skiff: boat (B) planet : star (C) page: volume (D) finger: thumb (E) car: truck ll. DECIBEL : SOUND :: (A) gallon: water (B) lumen : light (C) band:signal (D) weight : mineral (E) scale : music 12. STICKLER : APPROXIMATION :: (A) leader: guidance (B) connoisseur : anachronism (C) sluggard : indolence (D) purist : adulteration (E) scientist: theorizing 209 l3. l4. l5. l6. SYNONYMOUS : MEANING :: (A) interchangeable ; function (B) equivocal : interpretation (C) coincidental : cause (D) ambidextrous : skill (E) bilingual : language INSIPID : INVENTIOsz (A) ironic : gravity (B) realistic : originality (C) generic : artistry (D) foppish 2 affection (E) prosaic : imagination ‘ ' STREAM : EDDY :: (B) shove : punch (D) force : motion (A) trend : anomaly (C) assault : defeat (E) illness : symptom PIRATE : TAKE :: (B) forge : copy (D) liberate : free (A) burgle : steal (C) renege : promise (E) retreat : withdraw GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. Mycorrhizal fungi infect moreplants than do any other fungi and are necessary for many plants to thrive, but they have escaped widespread investigation until recently for two reasons. First, the symbiotic associa- tion is so well-balanced that the roOts of host plants show no damage even when densely infected. Second, the fungi cannot as yet be cultivated in the absence ofa living root. Despite these difficulties, therehas been important new work that suggests that this symbiotic association can be harnessed to achieve more economi- cal use of costly superphosphate fertilizer and to permit better exploitation of cheaper, less soluble rock phos- phate. Mycorrhizal benefits are not limited to improved phosphate uptake in host plants. In legumes, mycor- rhizal inoculation has increased nitrogen fixation - beyond levels achieved by adding phosphate fertilizer alone. Certain symbiotic associations also increase the host plant’s resistance to harmful root fungi. Whether this resistance results from exclusion of harmful fungi through competition for sites, from metabolic change involving antibiotic production, or from increased vigor is undetermined. 17. Which of the following most accurately describes the passage? (A) A description ofa replicable experiment (B) A summary report of new findings (C) A recommendation for abandoning a difficult area of research (D) A refutation of an earlier hypothesis (E) A confirmation of earlier research 18. The level of information in the passage above is suited to the needs of all of the following people EXCEPT (A) a researcher whose job is to identify potentially profitable areas for research and product development (B) a state official whose position requires her to alert farmers about possible innovations in farming (C) an official of a research foundation who identi- fies research projects for potential funding (D) a biologist attempting to keep up with scien- tific developments in an area outside of his immediate area of specialization (E) a botanist conducting experiments to deter- mine the relationship between degree of mycorrhizal infection and expected uptake of phosphate 210 19. It can be inferred from the passage that which of the following has been a factor influencing the extent to which research on mycorrhizal fungi has progressed? (A) Lack of funding for such research (B) Lack of immediate application of such research (C) Lack of a method for identifying mycorrhizal fungi . (D) Difficulties surrounding laboratory production , of specimens for study 7 (E) Difficulties ensuing from the high cost and scarcity of superphosphate fertilizers 20. The passage suggests which of the following about the increased resistance to harmful root fungi that some plants infected with mycorrhizal fungi seem to exhibit? (A) There are at least three hypotheses that might account for the increase. (B) An explanation lies in the fact that mycorrhizal fungi increase more rapidly in number than harmful root fungi do. (C) The plants that show increased resistance also exhibit improved nitrogen fixation. (D) Such increases may be independent of mycor- rhizal infection. (E) It is unlikely that a satisfactory explanation can be found to account for the increase. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. In the early 1950’s. historians who studied pre- ; . industrial Europe (which we may define here as Europe in the period from roughly 1300 to 1800) began, for the first time in large numbers, to inves- tigate more of the preindustrial European popula— tion than the 2 or 3 percent who comprised the political and social elite: the kings, generals, judges, nobles. bishops, and local magnates who had hith- erto usually filled history books. One difficulty, however, was that few of the remaining 97 percent recorded their thoughts or had them chronicled by contemporaries. Faced with this situation, many historians based their investigations on the only records that seemed to exist: birth, marriage, and ([5) death records. As a result, much of the early work on the nonelite was aridly statistical in nature; reducing the vast majority of the population to a set of numbers was hardly more enlightening than ignoring them altogether. Historians still did not (20) know what these people thought or felt. One way out of this-dilemma was to turn to the records of legal courts. for here the voices of the nonelite can most often be heard, as witnesses, plaintiffs, and defendants. These documents have acted as “a point of entry into the mental world of the poor." Historians such as Le Roy Ladurie have used the documents to extract case histories, which have illuminated the attitudes of different social groups (these attitudes include, but are not confined to, attitudes toward crime and the law) and have revealed how the authorities administered justice. It has been societies that have had a developed police system and practiced Roman law, with its written depositions, whose court records have yielded the most data to historians. In Anglo-Saxon countries hardly any of these benefits obtain, but it has still been possible to glean information from the study of legal documents. The extraction of case histories is not, however, the only use to which court records may be put. Historians who study preindustrial Europe have used the records to establish a series of categories of crime and to quantify indictments that were issued over a given number of years. This use of the (45) records does yield some information about the nonelite, but this information gives us little insight into the mental lives of the nonelite. We also know that the number of indictments in preindustrial Europe bears little relation to the number of actual (50) rriminal acts, and we strongly suspect that the rela- tionship has varied widely over time. In addition, aggregate population estimates are very shaky, which makes it difficult for historians to compare rates of crime per thousand in one decade of the preindustrial period with rates in another decade. Given these inadequacies, it is clear why the case history use of court records is to be preferred. (5) (10) (25) (30) (3 5) (40) (55) 211 The author suggests that, before the early 1950’s, most historians who studied preindustrial Europe did which of the following? (A) Failed to make distinctions among members of the preindustrial European political and social elite. (B) Used investigatory methods that were almost exclusively statistical in nature. (C) Inaccurately estimated the influence of the preindustrial European political and social elite. (D) Confined their work to a narrow range of the preindustrial European population. (E) Tended to rely heavily on birth, marriage, and death records. . According to the passage, the case histories extracted by historians have (A) scarcely illuminated the attitudes of the political . and social elite (B) indicated the manner in which those in power apportioned justice A (C) focused almost entirely on the thoughts and feel- ings of different social groups toward crime and the law (D) been considered the first kind of historical writ- ing that utilized the records of legal courts (E) been based for the mom part on the trial testi- mony of police and other legal authorities . It can be inferred from the passage that much of the early work by historians on the European nonelite of the preindustrial period might have been more illu- minating if these historians had (A) used different methods of statistical analysis to investigate the nonelite (B) been more successful in identifying the attitudes of civil authorities, especially those who administered justice, toward the nonelite . (C) been able to draw on more accounts, written by contemporaries of the nonelite, that described . what this nonelite thought (D) relied more heavily on the personal records left by members of the European political and social elite who lived during the period in question (E) been more willing to base their research on the birth, marriage, and death records of the nonelite GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 24. 25. The author mentions Le Roy Ladurie (line 26) in order to ' (A) give an example of a historian who has made one kind of use of court records (B) cite a historian who has based case histories on the birth, marriage, and death records of the nonelite (C) identify the author of the quotation cited in the previous sentence (D) gain authoritative support for the view that the case history approach is the most fruitful approach to court records (E) point out the first historian to realize the value of court records in illuminating the beliefs and values of the nonelite According to the passage, which of the following is true of indictments for crime in Europe in the pre- industrial period? (A) They have, in terms of their numbers, remained relatively constant over time. (B) They give the historian important information about the mental lives of those indicted. (C) They are not a particularly accurate indication of the extent of actual criminal activity. (D) Their importance to historians of the nonelite ' has been generally Overestimated. (E) Their problematic relationship to actual crime has not been acknowledged by most his- torians. IQ Id 26. It can be inferred from the passage that a historian 27. who wished to compare crime rates per thousand in a European city in one decade of the fifteenth cen- tury with crime rates in another decade of that cen- tury would probably be most aided by better infor- mation about which of the following? (A) The causes of unrest in the city during the two decades (B) The aggregate number ofindictments in the city nearest to the city under investigation during the two decades _ (C) The number of people who lived in the city during each of the decades under investiga- tron (D) The mental attitudes of criminals in the city, including their feelings about authority, dur- ing each of the decades under investigation (E) The possibilities for a member of the city’s nonelite to become a member of the political and social elite during the two decades The passage would be most likely to appear as part of (A) a book review summarizing the achievements of historians of the European aristocracy (B) an essay describing trends in the practice of writing history (C) a textbook on the application of statistical methods in the social sciences (D) a report to the historical profession on the work of early-twentieth-century historians (E) an article urging the ad0ption of historical methods by the legal profession GO ON .TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question belowconsists of a word ' ' Wapital letters. followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning. be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. DOMINATE: (A) have no ability to (B) have no control over (C) be irreconcilable (D) be angry (E) be undisciplined SIDESTEP: (A) confront directly (B) detain temporarily (C) comprehend accurately (D) judge hastily (E) treat fairly FACILITATE: (A) hallow (B) hamper (C) hurdle (D) hide (E) hold 30. 31. MUNDANE: (A) sufficient (B) superior (C) exotic (D) agile (E) perfect 32. 33. 36. 37, 38. EVLASTICITYr (A) lack ot‘spontaneity (B) lack oftension (C) lack of resilience (D) symmetry (E) permanence APPRISE: (A) oblige (B) underrate (C) apply pressure (D) offer encouragement (E) withhold information SQUALID: (A) florid (C) fervid (B) extraneous (D) abundant (E) pristine . MANIPULATIVE: (A) impassioned (B) lethargic (D) guileless (C) inept (E) unaltered ANTIPATHY : (A) pronounced talent (B) settled fondness (C) concealed passion (D) cultivated nostalgia (E) sustained interest FLEDGE: (A) seek (B) call (C) mate (D) emit (E) molt DIATRIBE: (A) encomium (B) epitome (C) euphemism (D) epistle (E) epigram FOR GENERAL TEST 5 ONLY Answer Key and Percentages' oi Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly r—‘—————‘——_—1 VEREAL ABILITY QUANTITATIVE A51L1TT ANAmeAL ABILITY Sectinn 2 Section 4 Section 3 Sutlan 6 Sectinn 1 1 355mm 5 Mumuer Answer Murmur Answer I Humher Answer ‘ P- Numuer Answer 1P- Murmur Answer P— i Humuer Answer I 1 1 . 1 ' 1 I 1 I 1 A 59 1 c i 93 1 A 55 i 1 A V 92 1 D ‘ 75 1 a 93 2 c 75 2 E 1 75 2 c 52 ' 2 5 ‘ 91 2 0 55+ 2 c 71 3 a 1 75 3 c 53 3 5 55 3 a 57 3 A 90 3 o 5 s7 4 S :69. 1 A ‘65 5 3 75. .1 A 11 4 a 70' 4 A ;59 5 A i 75 5 E 55 5 A 75 ' s D 54 5 c 55 5 a 75 i 1 1 . 1 5 E 1 41 5 E 51 5 A ' 75 I 5 A 1 55 5 a ' 50 5 o 55 7 a 1 1o 7 E 15 7 A 59 7 o 1 55 7 E 55 7 5 59 . 5 A 53 5 9 55 5 o 59 I a c l 77 5 A as 5 c 57 9 9 7o 9 A ’ so 9 a 52 i .9 3 1‘ 79 9 c 57 9 A 55 1o 9 71 10 A 54 10 A , 54 l 15 c 5 54 10 A 51 10 E { 77 11 o I 55 11 a 51 c 55 11. c 55 11 c 59 11 E 4.4 12 o 1 57 12 3 52 12 c 4 1 12 c 53 12 E 55 i 12 E 51 13 A 1 51 ' 13 A 37 13 D ‘ 42 13 o 1 57 13 c 52 13 o 42 14 c 35 14 E 35 14 a 42 K 14 D 45 14 D 24 14 c 55 15 c 29 15 A 27 15 ‘ o 25 1' 15 A 1 25 15 o 45 15 E 21 1 o 29 1 a 25 15 A 94 :5 c i 57 15 a 32 1 A 41 i 17 c 73 17 a 53 17 A 54 1 17 A 50 17 E 35 17 c 35 15 c 55 1 E 35 15 E 51 15 A “ 55 15 a 54 15 - A 23 19 A 50 19 o 55 19 o 75 1 19 E 53 19 a 35 19 A 30 20 c 43 20 A 57 20 5 73 I 20 a 53 20 c 42 20 E 39 21 E 15 21 D 51 21 c 1 93 i 21 a~ 55 E E 22 c 54 22 a 39 22 E 55 22 5 I 57 E c 23 A 55 23 c 55 23 c 75 23 A :9 A E 24 c 5 24 I A 59 24 5 52 24 E i 35 o s 25 A 37 25 c 7 25 o 35 ; 25 E 1 23 E o ! 25 o 75 25 c 50 25 c 55 25 o 59 27 A 55 27 5 so 27 c 45 27 o 52 25 5 9o 25 a 93 ~ 25 5 50 25 A 55 29 o 55 29 A 92 29 c 50 29 c 53 30 5 75 3a a 50 30 o 25 3o 0 44 31 o 42 31 c 74 32 A 45 32 c 57 33 E 47 33 E 53 34 A 40 34 E 35 35 D 25 35 D 42 35 E 27 36 5 29 37 E 24 37 E 23 35 5 21 35 A 21 'Eslimatad P + tor the group oi examinees who took the GRE General Test in a recent three-year period. 227 ...
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Bigbook_05 - SECTION 2 Time— 30 minutes 38 Questions...

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