Bigbook_08 - . ...w TEST 8 SECTION 1 Time — 30 minutes 38...

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Unformatted text preview: . ...w TEST 8 SECTION 1 Time — 30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence belowhas one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that E fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. Even though formidable winters are the norm in the Dakotas, many people were unprepared'for the of the blizzard of 1388. (B) ferocity (E) mildness (A) inevitability (C) importance (D) probability Ix.) As the first streamlined car, the Airflow represented a —-.——-— in automotive develOpment, and although its sales were ----—, it had an immense influence on automobile design. (A) milestone. .disappointing (B) breakthrough. .significant (C) regression. .unimportant (D) misjudgment. .calculable (E) revolution. .tolerable 3. While nurturing parents can compensate for adver- sity, cold or inconsistent parents may —--— it. (A) exacerbate (B) neutralize (C) eradicate (D) ameliorate (E) relieve 4. The architects of New York's early skyscrapers, hinting here at a twelfth-century cathedral, there at a fifteenth-century palace, sought to legitimize the city’s social strivings by a history the city did not truly . (A) revealing. .desarve (B) displaying. .desire (C) evoking. .possess (D) preserving. .experience (E) flouting. .believe 307 3. Actual events in the history oflife on Earth are accidental in that any outcome embodies just one —-——- among millions; yet each outcome can be interpreted. (A) coincidence. .randomly (B) relationship. .predictably (C) fact. .readily (D) happening. .uniquely (E) possibility. .rationally . Although some of her fellow scientiss -——— the unorthodox laboratory methodology that others found innovative, unanimous praise greeted her experimental results: at once pioneering and (A) ignored. .untrustworthy (B) complimented. .foreseeable (C) welcomed. .mundane (D) decried. .unexceptionable (E) attacked. .inconclusive . Early critics of Emily Dickinson's poetry mistook for simplemindedness the surface of artlessness that in fac: she constructed with such mm. (A) astonishment (B) vexation (C) allusion (D) innocence (E) cunning GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the following questions, a related 13. BARRAGE : EXPLOSWES :: pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs r (A) cacophony : sounds of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best (B) deluge : rain expresses a relationship Similar to that expressed in the (C) vista : sights original pair. - (D) grenade : bombs (E) volcano : lava 8. MICROSCOPE : SMALL 2: (A) telescope : distant l4. WARY : GULLED :: (B) monocle : single (A) passionate: moved (C) lens : refracted ' (B) taciturn : goaded (D) camera : photographic (C) loquacious : befriended (E) periscope : military ' I (D) vigilant : ambushed (E) shrill : satisfied 9. EXHIBITION ; PAINTING :: ‘ ' (A) concert : symphony 15. WILLFULNESS : HEADSTRONG :: (B) accompaniment : melody (A) glibness I astute (C) audition : chorus I . (B) determination : attentive (D) improvisation : solo (C) elegance 2 gran’diOSe (E) rehearsal : orchestra (D) subservience : fawning I . . . z (E) anxiety : pessimistic 10. STERILIZATION : MICROORGANISMS :: '(A) amnesty : deserters ‘ , 16. UNTENABLE : DEFENDED :: (B) defamation : enemies (A) valuable : insured (C) inoculation : vaccine (B) fordable : crossed (D) deforestation: trees ‘ (C) unjustifiable : forgiven (E) assassination : murderers (D) unpretentious : admired (E) invulnerable: injured 11‘ RUFFLE: SHIRT :: (A) rafter : roof (B) molding : cabinet (C) gate : path (D) curbzsidewalk (E) shade: window GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. ll. EMIGRATE : EXILE :: 7 (A) select :_ organize _ ,_(B)..appoint : nominate r w (C) capture : imprison (D) enlist : conscript (E) contribute : deduct (/0) (/5) Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage choose ’______ , . _. . . . b ’ me best answer to each question. Answer all questions tollowing a passage on the basrs of what 15 stated or implied in [hat passage. Because of its accuracy in outlining the Earth‘s subsurface. the seismic-reflection method remains the most important tool in the search for petroleum reserves. In field practice, a subsurface is mapped by arranging a series of wave-train sources. such as small dynamite explosions, in a grid pattern. As each source is activated. it generates a wave train that moves downward at a Speed determined uniquely by the rock’s elastic charac« teristics. As rock interfaces are crossed. the elastic char- acteristics encountered generally change abruptly, which causes part of the energy to be reflected back to the surface. where it is recorded by seismic instruments. The seismic records must be processed to correct for posi- tional differences between the source and the receiver. for unrelated wave trains. and for multiple reflections from the rock interfaces. Then the data acquired at each of the specific source locations are combined to generate a physical profile of the subsurface. which can eventually be used to select targets for drilling. l7. The passage is primarily concerned with (A) describing an important technique (B) discussing a new method (C) investigating a controversial procedure (D) announcing a significant discovery (E) promoting a novel application l8. According to the passage, in the seismic-reflection method all of the follou/ing have a significant effect on the signal detected by the seismic instruments EXCEPT the (A) presence of unrelated wave trains (B) placement ofthe seismic instruments (C) number of sources in the grid pattern (D) nature of the reflectivity ofthe rock interfaces (E) properties of rocks through which the wave train has traveled 19. 20. It can be inferred from the passage that the seismic- reflection method would be likely to yield an inaccu- rate physical profile of the subsurface in which of the folIOWing circumstances? (A) If the speed at which the wave train moved downward changed (B) If the receiver were not positioned directly at the wave- train source. (C) If the rock on one side of a rock interface had similar elastic characteristics to those of the rock on the other side. (D) If the seismic records obtained for the different sources in a grid were highly similar to each other (E) If there were no petroleum deposits beneath the ' area defined by the grid of wave-train sources Which of the follou'ing best describes the organiza- tion of the passage? (A) A method is criticized. and an alternative is suggested. (B) An illustration is examined, and some errors are exposed. (C) An assertion is made. and a procedure is outlined. (D) A series of examples is presented, and a conclu‘ sion is drawn. (E) A hypothesis is advanced, and supporting evidence is supplied. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Line (5) (10) (15) (20) (25) (30) (35/ (40) {45) (50) Modern archaeological finds can still contribute much to the study of ancient literature. For example, forty years ago a survey of the early Greek dramatist Aeschylus’ plays would have started with The Suppliant Women . Many factors internal to the play, but perhaps most especially the prominence of the chorus (which in this play has the main role), led scholars to consider it one of Aeschylus’ earlier works. The consensus was that here was a drama truly reflecting an early stage in the evolution of tragedy out of choral lyric. The play was dated as early as the 490‘s BC, in any event, well before Aeschylus' play The Persians of 472 BC. Then, in 1952, a fragment of papyrus found at Oxyrhynchus was published stating the official circumstances and results of a dramatic contest. The fragment announced that Aeschylus won first prize with his Danaid tetralogy, of which The Supplianz Women is the opening play, and defeated Sophocles in the promss. Sophocles did not compete in any dramatic contest before 468 B.C., when he won his first victory. Hence, except by special pleading (e.g., that the tetralogy was composed early in Aeschylus’ career but not produced until the 460‘s BC) the Danaid tetralogy must be put after 468 BC. In addition, a few letters in the fragment suggest the name Archedemides, archon in 463 BC, thus perhaps tying the plays to that precise date, almost exactly halfway between Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes of 467 BC. and his Orestei'a. The implication of the papyrus administered a severe shock to the vast majority of classical scholars, who had confidently asserted that not only the role of the chorus but also language, metrics, and characterization all pointed to an early date. The discovery has resulted in no less than a total reevaluation of every chronological criterion that has been applied to or derived from Aeschylus‘ plays. The activity has been brisk, and a new creed has now spread. The prominence of the chorus in The Suppliant Women now is seen not as a sign of primi- tivism but as analogous to the massive choral songs of the Oresiei'a. Statisticshave been formulated, or refor- mulated. to show that stylistically The Suppliani Women does actually occupy a position after The Persians and Seven Against Thebes‘ which now become the “primi- tive” plays. and before the Oresieia. While the new doctrine seems almost certainly correct, the one papyrus fragment raises the specter that another may be unearthed. shewing, for instance. that it was a posthu- mous production of the Danaid tetralogy which bested Sophocles. and throwing the date once more into utter confusion. This is unlikely to happen, but it warns us that perhaps the most salutary feature of the papyrus scrap is its message of the extreme difficulty of classi- fying and categorizing rigidly the development of a creative artist. 310 2]. 22. The author of the passage focuses primarily on (A) discussing a series of modern archaeological finds and their impact on the study of Greek literature ' (B) recounting the chect of one archaeological find on modern ideas concerning a particular author’s work (C) giving a definitive and coherent account of the chronology of a particular author‘s work (D) illustrating the many varieties of difficulties involved in establishing facts concerning ancient literature (E) determining the exact value of archaeological finds in relation to the history of ancient liter- ature ‘ With respect to the~study of ancient literature, which of the following statements best expresses the author‘s main point concerning modern archaeolog— ical finds? (A) They can profoundly alter accepted views of ancient literary works, and can encourage flexibility in the way scholars look at the creative development of any artist. (B) They can be severely shocking and can have a revivifying efTect on the study of ancient liter- ature, which has recently suffered from a lack of interest on the part of scholars. (C) They can raise more questions than they answer and can be unreliable sources of information. (D) They generally confirm scholars‘ ideas about ancient literary works and allow them to dispense with inferences drawn from the works‘ internal structure. (E) They often undermine scholarly consensus in certain areas and create utter confusion concerning an author's work. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Ix) b) According to the passage, in the absence ofdefinite knowledge concerning the dates ofcornposition of ancient literary works, literary historians do which of the following when trying to establish the chronology of an author's work? (A) Make assumptions about a single work’s date of composition if such assumptions would not seriously affect interpretations of other works by the same author. (B) Draw inferences concerning the date of a work's composition based on evidence internal to that work and on the author's other works. (C) Ignore the date ofa work's composition which is supplied by archaeological research when literary factors internal to the work contra- dict that date. (D) Refrain from speculation concerning :1 works date ofcomposition unless archaeological finds produce information concerning it. (E) Estimate the date ofa work's composition without attempting to relate it to the author‘s development as an artist. It can be inferred from the passage that which of the following plays or groups of plays is considered the latest in the date ofits composition? (A) The Persians (B) The Danaid tetralogy (C) The Oresleia (D) Seven Against Thebes (E) The Supp/fan: Women 311 . With which of the following statements regarding the chronological criteria mentioned in lines 33-34 would the author be most likely to agree? (A) Such criteria. whether applied to or derived from the plays, should only be used to confirm already existing knowledge. (8) Such criteria, although derived from reliable external and internal evidence. should be changed continually to avoid rigidity in thinking. (C) Such criteria. based on statistical analysis, are inherently more reliable than those of forty years ago. (D) Such criteria. even when unsupported by external evidence. can resolve most questions. (E) Such criteria. based on often ambiguous internal evidence. can lead to erroneous reconstructions of the chronology of an author's work. . The author's attitude toward the “activity” mentioned in line 35 and its consequences can best be described as one of (A) amused tolerance (B) mocking envy (C) grave doubt (D) angry disapproval (E) unrestrained enthusiasm . The allusion to the hypothetical papyrus fragment in lines 45-49 d0es which of the foll0wing’.’ (A) Supports an argument concerning the date of The Supp/fan: Women. (B) Refutes the views of the majority ofscholars concerning the Oxyrhynchus papyrus find. (C) Predicts the future results of archaeological research proposed in the passage. (D) Undermines the validity of the currently accepted chronology of Aeschylus‘ works. (E) Qualifies the author’s agreement with the “new creed" developed since the Oxyrhynchus papyrus find. GO or: To THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. (B) painstaking (E) contrite 28. SHALLOW: (A) arbitrary (C) profound (D) restive 29. IMMUNE: (A) toxic (B) vinilent (C) convalescent (D) having little energy (E) having no resiSLance PROPAGATE: (A) hesitate tojoin (B) hope to prosper (C) decide to accept (D) begin to falter (E) fail to multiply 30. 31. LULL: (A) pronounced interest (B) intense discussion (C) speedy resolution (D) increased activity (E) enhanced performance '4) . 35. ‘Q 32. 33. 34. 3 6. PERPETUAL: (A) antecedent (B) coincident (C) intermittent (E) languorous (D) precipitous ACCOLADE: (A) guarded emotion (B) scarce resource (D) repercussion (C) tempon'zation (E) criticism GAMBOL: (A) admit (B) plod (C) ruin (D) follow (E) fret REFUIAHON: (A) approval (C) amplification (E) computation REQUITE: (C) consume quickly (A)‘ incite (E) leave unrepaid REVERE: (A) imitate (C) confuse MOLLIFY: (C) abate (D) profane (A) ire (B) (D) oppose (B) verification (D) concurrence (B) applaud (D) make inhospitable (B) dismiss (E) disgrace commence (E) infuse SECTION 5 > Time~~30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for ach blank that E fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. . 1. This project is the first step in a long-range plan of research whose ——-- goal, still many years off, is the creation of a new prototype. (A) cooperative (B) reasoned (C) original (D) ultimate (E) intentional 2. Eric was frustrated because, although he wg adept at making lies sound ' , when telling the truth, he the power to make himself believed. (A) plausible. .lacked (C) honest. .found (E) logical. .claimed (B) convincing. .held (D) true. .aequired 3. In certain forms of discourse such as the parable, the central point of a message can be elTectively commu- nicated even though this point is not (A) preferred (B) explicit (C) inferable (D) discerned (E) illustrated 4. Always circumspect, she was reluctant to make judg— ments. but once arriving at a conclusion, she was in its defense. (A) nonplussed (C) intransigent (E) negligent (B) obsequious (D) deferential 26 ‘5. The techniques now available to livestock breeders will continue to be , but will probably be by new ones under development. (A) fruitful. .rcverscd (B) refined. .upgmded (C) inconvenient. .reassessed (D) used..supplemented ‘ (E) harmless. .irnproved . Any population increase beyond a certain level necessitates greater vegetable foods; thus. the ability of a society to choose meat over cereals always arises, in part, from the number of ' people. (A) reliance on. .replenishing (B) production of. .estimating (C) spending on. .conccaling (D) recourse to. .limiting (E) attention to. .varying . Ethologists are convinced that many animals survive through learning—but learning that is‘ their genetic programming, learning as thoroughly ~— 35 the most instinctive of behavioral responses. (A) superseded by. .primitive (B) compatible with. .transient (C) complementary to. .familiar (D) derived from. .inventive (E) dictated by. :stereotyped GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the folIOWing questions, a related 13. SUPPLANT: REPLACE 22 pair of words or phrases is fol10wed by five lettered pairs (A) snatch : take of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best (B) beg : invite exprCSSCS a relationship similar to that expressed in the (C) convict 2 accuse original pair. (D) savor: gulp (E) miss : lose 8. OSTRlCH-2 BIRD :: (A) caterpillar: moth 14‘ ALLERGY: REACTION 22 (B) lizard : frog (A) rash : body (C) bud : leaf (B) lancet : instrument (D) tiger 2 cat (C) antihistamine : symptom (E) gusr 2 stOrm . (D) cocoon : skeleton (E) pollen : flower 9. WARDROBE: CLOTHES 22 . (A) stove : crockery l5. APHORISTIC : TERSE 2: (B) bookcase 2 books (A) eloquent : ornate (C) drawer : shelves (B) esoteric 2 important (D) pantry: medicine (C) hyperbolic: exaggerated (E) necklace : earrings (D) metaphorical : fantastic (E) equivocal : straightforward 10. PRACTICING : EXPERTISE 2: (A) thinking: logic ’ l6. ZEALOUS : ENTHUSIASTIC 2: (B) writing : clarity (A) pedantic : educated (C) growing : health (B) flamboyant : stylish (D) exerc1s1ngzs-trengtl1 (C) cautious: prudent (E) eating : nutrition (D) pious : Virtuous (E) idolatrous : devoted _ ll. ARTERY: PLAQUE :2 (A) river: levee (B) track 2 switch . (C) channel : silt (D) information : flow (E) tunnel : wall _ GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. l2. ANECDOTE : STORY 22 - . _- (A)-f1lm 2 theater (B) chapter: novel (C) lyric: song (D) joke : parody (E) 'skit : play 327 Line (5} ([0) (15) \ Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based On its content; After reading a passage, choose that passage. Scholars often fail to see that music played an impor- tant role in the preservation of African culture in the United States. They conectly note that slavery stripped some cultural elements from Black people—their polit- ical and economic systems—but they underestimate the significance of music in sustaining other African cultural values. African music, unlike the music of some other cultures, was based on a total vision of life in which music was not an isolated social domain. In African culture music was pervasive, serving not onlyfiligion, but all phases oflife, including birth, death, work, and play. The methods that a community devises to perpet- uate itself come into being to preserve aspects of the cultural legacy that that community perceives as essen- tial. Music, like art in general, was so inextricably a part , of African culture that it became a crucial means of preserving the culture during and after the dislocations of slavery. 17. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) analyze the impact'that slavery had on African political and economic systems (B) review the attempt of recent scholarship to study the influence of African music on other music , (C) correct the failure of some scholars to appre- ciate the significance of music in African culture (D) survey the ways by which people attempt to preserve their culture against the effects of oppression (E) compare the relative importance of music with that of otherart forms in culture 18. In line 9, the phrase “isolated social domain" refers to (A) African music in relation to contemporary culture as a whole (B) music as it may be perceived in non-African cultures (C) a feature of African music that aided in trans- mitting African cultural values (D) an aspect of the African cultural legacy (E) the influence of music on contemporary culture i9. the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in Which of the following statements conCerning the function of African music can be inferred from the passage? ' (A) It preserved cultural values because it wu thor- oughly integrated into the lives of the people. (B) It was moreimportant in the development of African religious life than in other areas of culture. I (C) It wu developed in response to the loss of polit- ical and economic systems. ' (D) Its pervasiveness in African culture hinderw its effectiveness in minimiz‘ng the impact of slavery. . (E) Its isolation from the economic domains of life enabled it to-survive the destructive impact of slavery. According to' the author, scholars would err in drawing which of the following conclusions? I. Slavery stripped the slaves of their political and economic systems. . II. African music was similar to all other traditions of music in that it originated in a total vision of life. Music was a crucial part of the African cultural legacy. (A) Ionly (B) II only (C) I and II only (D) II and III only (E) I, II, and III ‘ III. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. LM6 (1‘) J10} III) I20) 1!?) {30} (35) (40) (45) (50) (55) Traditionally, pollination by wind has been viewed as a reproductive process marked by random events in which the vagaries of the wind are compensated for by the generation of vast quantities of pollen, so that the ultimate production of new seeds is assured at the expense of producing much more pollen than is actually used. Because the potential hazards pollen grains are subject to as they are transported over long distances are enormous, wind-pollinated plants have, in the view above. compensated for the ensuing loss of pollen through happenstance by virtue of producing an amount of pollen that is one to three orders of magnitude greater than the amount produced by species pollinated by insects. However. a number of features that are characteristic of wind-pollinated plants reduce pollen waste. For example. many wind-pollinated species fail to release pollen when wind speeds are low or when humid condi- tions prevail. Recent studies suggest another way in which species compensate for the inefficiency of wind pollination. These studies suggest that species frequently take advantage of the physics of pollen motion by gener- ating specific aerodynamic environments within the immediate vicinity of their female reproductive organs. It is the morphology of these organs that dictates the pattern ofairflow disturbances through which pollen must travel. The speed and direction of the airfl0w disturbances can combine with. the physical properties of a species‘ pollen to produce a species-specific pattern of pollen collision on the surfaces of female reproductive organs. Provided that these surfaces are strategically located, the consequences of this combination can signif~ icantly increase the pollen-capture efficiency ofa female reproductive organ. A critical question that remains to be answered is whether the morphological attributes of the female reproductive organs of wind-pollinated species are evolu- tionary adaptations to wind pollination or are merely fortuitous. A complete resolution of the question is as yet impossible sinc: adaptation must be evaluated for each species within its Own unique functional context. However, it must be said that, while evidence of such evolutionary adaptations does exist in some species, one must be careful about attributing morphology to adapta‘ tion. For example, the spiral arrangement of scale-bract complexes on ovule-bearin'g pine cones, where the female reproductive organs of conifers are located, is important . to the production of airflow patterns that spiral over the cone’s surfaces, thereby passing airborne pollen from one scale to the next. However, these patterns cannot be viewed as an adaptation to wind pollination because the spiral arrangement occurs in a number of non-wind- pollinated plant lineages and is regarded as a character- istic of vascular plants, of which conifers are only one kind, as a whole. Therefore, the spiral arrangement is not likely to be the result ofa direct adaptation to wind pollination. 3'29 21. The author of the passage is primarily concerned with discussing (A) the current debate on whether the morpholog< ical attributes of wind-pollinated plants are evolutionary adaptations ' (B) the kinds of airflow patterns that permit wind- pollinated plants to capture pollen most eiT- ciently - ‘ (C) the ways in which the reproductive processes of wind-pollinated plants are controlled by random events (D) a recently proposed explanation ofa way in which wind-pollinated plants reduce pollen waste (E) a specific morphological attribute that permits one species of wind‘pollinated plant to capture pollen 22. The author suggests that explanations of wind polli- nation that emphasize the production of vast quanti- ties of pollen to compensate for the randomness of the pollination process are (A) debatable and misleading (B) ingenious and convincing (C) accurate butincomplete (D) intriguing but controversial" (E) plausible but unverifiable 23. According to the passage, the “aerodynamic envi- ronments" mentioned in line 23, when they are produced, are primarily determined by the (A) presence of insects near the plant (B) physical properties of the plant's pollen (C) shape of the plant's female reproductive organs (D) amount of pollen generated by the plant (E) number of seeds produced by the plant 24. According to the passage, true statements about the release of pollen by wind-pollinated plants include which of the following? 'I. The release can be affected by certain environ- mental factors. II. The amount of pollen released increases on a . rainy day. HI. Pollen is sometimes not released by plants when there is little wind. ' x * r (A) [I only (B) III only (C) I and [I only (D) I and I'll only (E) I, II, and III GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 25. 26. The passage suggess that the recent studies cited-in lines 19-21 have n_ot done which of the following? (A)- Made any distinctions between different species of wind-pollinated plans. I (B) Considered the physical propertiesof theypollen that is produced by wind-pollinated plans. (C) Indicated the general range within which plant- generated airflow disturbances are apt to occur. (D) Included investigations of the physics of pollen motion and is relationship to the efficient capture of pollen by the female reproductive organs of wind-pollinath plans. (E) Demonstrated that the morphological attributes of the female reproductive organs of wind- pollinated plants are usually evolutionary adaptations to wind pollination. It can be inferred from the passage that the claim that the spiral arrangement of scale-bract complexes on an ovule-bearing pine cone is an adaptation to wind pollination would be more convincing if which of the following were true? (A) Such an arrangement occurred only in wind- pollinated plants. (B) Such an arrangement occurred in vascular plants as a whole. (C) Such an arrangement could be shown to be beneficial to pollen release. (D) The number of bracs could be shown to have increased over time. 7 (E) The-airflow patterns over the cone’s surfaces could be shown to be produced by such arrangemens. 330 27. Which of the following, if known, is likely to have been the kind of evidence used to support the view described in the first paragraph? (A) Wind speeds need not be verylow for wind— pollinated plans to fail to release pollen. (B) The female reproductive organs of plans often have a sticky surface that allows them to crap airborne pollen systematically. _ J (C) Grasses, as Well as conifers, generate specific aerodynamic environmens within the imme- diate vicinity of their reproductive organs. . (D) Rain showers often wash airborne pollen out of the air before it ever reaches an appropriate plant. (E) The density and size of an airborne pollen grain ~ are of equal importance in determining whether that grain will be captured by a plant. _ GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word 33. NEOLOGISM: (A) \Syllogism (B) idealism printed in capital letters. followed by five lettered words (C) archaism (D) paternalism (E) ostraciSm or phrases. Ch005e the lettered word or phrase that is Irntczzlt-Snearly opposue in meaning to the word in capital 34. RARsz (A) condense (B) conceive e . (C) consign (D) conduct (E) confound Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of'meaning, be sure to consider all the . . . . . . 35. CAUSTIC: (A) nonflamrnable (B) anesthetic ch0ices before dec1ding which‘one is best. (C) antiseptic (D) convoluted (E) innocuous 28. IMPROMPTU: (A) carefully rehearsed 36 sou/Ev . . . i : (A) catalyst (B) deteraent (B) Widely recognized (C) narrowly focused (C) reactant (D) lubricant (E) piedpimm (D) purposely vague (E) unwittingly funny . 37. ESTIMABLE: (A) recalcitrant (B) mendacious 29. BALLOON: (A) regain completely . . , (B) decrease slowly (C) respond rapidly (C) mfamous (D) Obsunate (E) Sungy (D) survey thoroughly (E) request humbly 38. PRODIGALITY: (A) disinterest (B) guilt 30. AVID: (A) independent (B) inquisitive (C) PaSSqu)’ (D) penury (E) perfidy (C) forgetful (D) swift (E) indifferent 3l. MOROSE: (A) fast-talking (B) quick-witted (C) lighthearted (D) casual (E) charming 32. ANOMALY: (A) predicted occurrence (8) temporary solution _ - M iv 7 (C) easy problem _. (D) continuous process (E) constant interference 331 FOR GENERAL TEST 3 ONLY ' Answer Key and Percentages' 01 Ethinees Answering Each Question Correctly ANALYTICAL ABILITY mm:— mm m: 1+ ' 1+ nun-oer Am 1 B 94 1 D 94 B A 1 E 91 1 E 2 A 94 2 A 93 c B 2 B 80 2 c 3 A 71 3 B c A 3 D 90 3 E 72 4 c 64 4 c A B 4 D . 77 4 A 62 5 E 55 5 D D D 5 E 79 5 D 61 6 D 43 a D A A 6 c 68 6 C 51 7 E 53- 7 E B D 7 A 69 7 B 79 8 A 90 8 D D A 8 c 81 8 B 67 9 A 79 9 B D C 9 D 57 9 A 53 18 D 69 10 D B D 10 D 78 10 c 81 11 B 59' 11 c D C 11 A 61 11 E 86 12 D 44 12 E A c ' 35 12 D 64 12 D 82 13 a 41 13 A C B 26 13 a 77 13 B 64 14 D 31 14 B C C 37 14 A 70 14 B 45 15 \D 27 15 c A C 25 15 E 62 15 E 50 16 E 27 16 E E D 93 16 c 53 16 c 49 17 A 92 17 c B D 81 17 B 35 17 A 44 18 c 53 18 a A A 80 18 A 49 18 D 52 19 c 34 19 A D B 75 19 D 32 19 a 55 20 c 84 20 a E 8 7o 20 A 63 20 D 25 21 a 58 21 D E D 70 21 E 45 21 - E 25 2 A 68 2 c D B 56 2 E 31 2 E 18 23 a 81 23 c A B 66 23 a 44 23 D 53 24 c 59 24 D c A 55 24 a 59 24 D 73 25 E 49 25 E B E _34 25 a 41 25 c 59 26 A 34 26 A A c 57 27 E 23 27 D c E 45 28 c 57 29 A E C 40 29 E 34 29 a E B 32 30 E 60 30 E D E 15 31 D 75 31 c 32 c 76 32 A 33 E 58 33 c 34 B 37 34 A 35 a 45 35 E 36 E 37 36 E 37 D 26 37 c 38 A 20 35 D 'Estimated P+ for the group of examinees who took the GRE General Test in a recent three-year period. 344 ...
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Bigbook_08 - . ...w TEST 8 SECTION 1 Time — 30 minutes 38...

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