Bigbook_10 - TEST 10 ' ‘ ‘ SECTION 1 Time—30 minutes...

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Unformatted text preview: TEST 10 ' ‘ ‘ SECTION 1 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for web blank that b_es_t fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. It was a war the queen and her more prudent coun- selors wished to -——- if they could and were deter- [mined in any event to --— as long as possible. (A) provoke. .delay (B) denounce. .deny (C) instigate. .conceal (D) curtail. .promote (E) avoid. .postpone' . Despite many decades 'of research on the gasification of coal, the data accumulated are not directly —-—- to environmental queStions; thus a new program of research specifically addressing such questions is (A) analogous. .promising (B) transferable. contradictory (C) antithetical. .unrernarkable (D) applicable. .warranted (E) pertinent. .unnecessary . Unlike other creatures, who are shaped largely by their environment, human beings are products of a culture accumulated over centuries, yet one that is constantly being by massive infinions of new information from everywhere. (A) harsh..unconfirmed (B) surrounding. .upheld r - (C) immediate. .transformed (D) natural, .mechanized (E) limited..superseded . Edith Wharton sought in her memoir to present herself as having achieved a harmonious wholeness by having the conflicting elements of her life. (A) affirmed (B) highlighted (C) reconciled (D) confined (E) identified 384 ' 5. In their preface, the collection’s editors plead that certain of the important articles they were published too recently forinclusion, but in the case of many such articles, this is not valid. (A) discussed. .replacement (B) omitted. .excuse (C) revised. clarification _‘ (D) disparaged. .jusn'fication (E) ignored. .endorsement . The labor union and the company’s management, despite their long history of unfailingly acerbic disagreement on nearly every issue, have neverthe- - less reached an unexpectedly , albeit still tenta- tive, agreement on next year's contract. (A) swift (B) onerous (C) hesitant (D) reluctant (E) conclusive . In response to the follies of today‘s conunercial and poliqu worlds, the author d0es not inflamed indignation, but rather the detachment and mpoth aphoristic prose of an eighteenth-century wit. (A) display. .rails at (B) rely on. .avoids (C) suppress. .clings to (D) express. .affects (E) resort to. .spurns GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Direo’ :23: In. each of the following qucstions. a rcla£ed pair 0_ words or phrases is followed by live lettered pairs of words at phrasos. Select the lateral pair that best exprmsefi a role tionsltip similar to that cxpressod in the original pair. 8t PEAR :, (TOWER :: (A) calmness : fret (B) rant (C) disappointment :corisolc (L‘) madness : satisfy (ti) embartassment : speak 9 lb" (‘11:? IA : DECOMI’OSI‘I'ION :: a : eruption 'm’llin : injection ' [fil’lficlltaliflll gm : respitation ‘ ; ylfl tits : deforestation m t" : MOUTH :: (A) Lth b : sidewalk ' ’ 1 sky am : dam \ '1! tairi : range iii} mitmgmoom orgt ll, 5%), > ; ’1‘) HRST :: (A) pearspitr. :excrtiort (B) mean 2 wire (C) sbivex: muscle ?- (D) r? ’ ::lmnge.r (E) (imam : slccp 385 12. l4. l6. FOIBLE : FAULT :3 (A) perjury '. testimony (B) reputation : disrepute (C) vagatyznotion (D) fcuo‘ : hostility (E) quibblczobjcctiort \ . IMPORT U N REQUEST :1‘ (A) pry:inquity (B) balk: obstacle “ ‘r (C) fulrrtinatmsflerjcc (D) discouutcuanoe: plan (1%) vitiatc. : punislmtettt ~~ ' v MILL 2 GRAIN :: (A) loomrcloth‘ (H) bazaar:wam _ (C) factory: Furniture (D) hospital : medicine (1-1) forgeztuctal UAGUERREOTYPE : PHO'I‘OGRAPH :: (A) bust : statue (B) pastiche : painting (C) ilariativcmovcl (D) hieroglyphic: papyrus (E) ‘ruusl-(ct : fits-arm ‘ INDIS’I'INGLHSHABLE : CONFOUND :: (A) cxorptiorta! : overlook ‘ (B) ilxqucgv:tatrl(--2 attack. (C) ostuflatiom : consume ‘ (D) cqm‘vaknt : ititcrchztuge (l3) oozivdt'il»: reveal GO ON i0 THE NEXT PAGE Line (5) (101' (l5) ‘ \ Direcn‘ons: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose that passage. The 1960’s witnessed two profound social move- ments: the civil rights movement andvthe movement protesting the war in Vietnam. Although they over- lapped in time, they were largely distinct. For a brief moment in 1967, however, it appeared that the two movements might uniteunderthe leadership of Martin Luther King, Jr. ' King’s role in the antiwar movement appears to require little explanation, since he wasthe foremost advocate of nonviolence of his time. But King's stance on the Vietnam War cannot be explained in terms of ' paciftsm alone. After all. he was something of flat:- comer to the antiwar movement, even though by l965 he was convinced that the role of the United Stats in the war was indefensible. Why then the two years that passed before he translated his private misgivings into public dissent? Perhaps he believed that he could not criticize American foreign policy without endangering the support for civil rights that he had won from the federal. government. 17. According to the passage, the delay referred to in lines 12-15 is perhaps attributable to which of the fol10wing? (A) King’s ambivalence concerning the role of the United States in the war in Vietnam (B) King’s attemptsto consolidate support for his leadership within the civil rights movement (C) King's desire to keep the lmdership of the civil rights movement distinct from that of the antiwar movement (D) King’s desire to draw support for the civil rights movement from the leadership of the antiwar ' movement (E) King’s reluctance to jeopardize federal support for the civil rights movement 386 the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in 18. The author supports the claim that “King’s Astance 19. 20. on the Vietnam War cannot-be explained in terms of pacifism alone" (lines 1042) by implying which of the following? (A) There is little evidence that King was ever a student of pacifist doctrine. r (E) King, despite pacifist sympathies, was not convinced that the policy of the federal ' government in Vietnam was wrong. (C) King’s belief in nonviolence was formulated in terms of domestic policy rather than in terms of international issues. (D) Had King's actions been based on pacifism alone, he would have joined the antiwar movement earlier than he actually did. (E) Opponents of United Stats foreign policy within the federal government convinCed King of their need for support. Which of the folIOWing can be inferred from the passage about the movement opposing the war in Vietnam? (A) It preceded the civil rights movement. (B) It began in 1965. (C) It was supported by many who otherwise opposed public dissent. (D) It drew support from most civil rights leaders. (E) It was well underway by 1967. Which of the following best describes the passage? (A) It discusses an apparent inconsistency and suggess a mson for it. , (B) It outlines a sequence of historical events. (C) It shows why a commonly held view is inaccu- ‘ rate. (D) It evaluates an explanation and finally accepts that explanation. (E) It contrasts two views of an issue. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. we (5) (/0) (15) (20) (25} {30) I35} «40) r '45) 30) :5) What causes a helix in nature to appear with either a dextral (“right-handed." or clockwise) twist or a sinistral (“left-handed,” or counterclockwise) twist is one of the most intriguing puzzles in the science of form. Most spiral-shaped snail species are predominantly dextral. But at one time, handedness (twist direction of the shell) was equally distributed within some snail species that have become predominantly dextral or, in a few species, predominantly sinistral. What mechanisms control hand-_ edness and keep left-handedness rare? . It would seem unlikely that evolution should discrimi- nate against sinistral snails if siniStral and dextral snails are exact mirror images, for any disadvantage that a sinistral twist in itself couldconfer on its possmsor is almost inconceivable. But left- and right-handed snails are not actually true mirror images of one another. Their shapes are noticeably different. Sinistral rarity might, then, be a consequence of possible disadvantages conferred by these other concomitant structural features. In addition, perhaps left- and right<handed snails cannot mate with each other, having incompatible twist direc- tions. Presumably an individual of the rarer form would have relative difficulty in finding a nrate of the same hand, thus keeping the 'rare form rare or creating geographically separated right- and left-handed popula- uons But this evolutionary mechanism combining dissym- metry, anatomy, and chance does not provide an adequate explanation of why right-handedness should have become predominant. It does not explain, for example, why the infrequent unions between snails of opposing hands produce fewer offspring of the rarer than the commoner form in species where each parent ' contributes equally to handedness. Nor does it explain why,in a specie: where one parent determines handed- ness, a brood is not exclusively right- or left-handed when the offspring would have the same genen'c predis- position. In the European pond snail Lyrnnaea peregra, a predominantly dextral speeia whose handedness is maternally determined, a brood might be expected to be exclusively right- or left-handed—and this often occurs. However, some broods possess a few snails of the opposing hand, and in predominantly sinisual broods, the incidence of dextrality is surprisingly high. Here, the evolutionary theory must defer to a theory based on an explicit developmental mechanism that can favor either right- or left-handedness. In, the case of Lymaea peregra, studies indicate that a dextral gene is ' expressed during egg forman'on; i.e., before egg fertiliza- tion, the gene producesaprotein, found in the cyto- ' plasm of the eg, that controls the pattern of cell divi- sion and thus handedness. In experiments, an injection of cytoplasm from dextral eggs changes the pattern of sinistral eggs, but an injection from sinistral eggs does not influence dextral eggs. One explanation. for the differing effects is that all Lymnaea peregra eggs begin ‘left-handed but most switch to being right-handed. Thus, the path to a solution to the puule of handedness in all snails appears to be as twisted as the helix itself. 387 1. Which of the following would‘serve as an example of “concomitant structural features" (line 19) that might disadvantage a snail of the rarer form? (A) A shell and body that are an exact mirror image of a snail of the commoner form (B) A smaller population of the snails of the rarer form , (C) A chip or fracture in the shell caused by an object falling on it ' (’D) A pattern on the shell that better camouflages it (E) A smaller shell opening that restricts mobility and ingestion relative to that of a snail of the commoner form . The second paragraph of the passage is primarily concerned with offering posnbleJcasons why (A) it is unlikely that evolutionary mechanisms could discriminate against sinistral snails (B) sinistrality is relatively uncommon among snail species , . (C) dextral and sinistral populations of a snail species tend to intermingle (D) a theory based on a developmental mechanism inadequately accounts for the predominance of dextrality across snail species ‘ g (E) dextral snails breed more readily than sinistral snails, even within predominantly sinistr'al populations] ' 7‘ . In describing the “evolutionary mechanisn" (line 27), the author mentions which of the following? (A) The favorable conditions for nurturing new offspring _ I (B) The variable environmental conditions that affect survival of adult snails (C) The availability of potential mats for breeding (D) The structural identity of offspring to parents of the samehand (E) The frequency of unions between snails of different species GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 24. 25. Accordingto the passage, which of the following is true of Lymnaea peregra'l ‘ » (A) Handedness Within the species was at one time equally distributed between left and right. (B) Under laboratory conditions. dextral eggs from Lymnaea peregra can be artificially induced to develop into sinistral snails. “W (C) Broods of Lymnaea peregra are, without varia- tion, exclusively sinistral or dextraL (D) Handedness in Lymnaea peregra offspring is determined by only one of the parents. (E) Geographic factors have played a larger role than has genetics in the evolution of the specres. The passage implies that in Lyman peregra,-there will generally be (A) more ofi‘Spring of the nondominant hand in broods where handedness is determined after, I rather than before, fatilimtion (B) a sinistral gene that produces a protein in the cytoplasm of the egg cell (C) fewer sinistra] offspring in dextral broods than dextral offspring in sinistral broods (D) equal numbers of exclusively left- and right- handed broods (E) an increasing occurrence of left-handedness in successive broods 26. 27. It can be inferred from the passage that a predomi- nantly sinistral snail species might stay predomi? " nantly sinistral for each of the following, reasons ’- EXCEPT for (A) a developmental mechanism that affects the I cell—division pattern of snails (B) structtu'al features that advantage dextral snails of the species ' (C) a relatively small number of snails of the same hand for dextral snails of the species to mate with (D) anatomical incompatibility that prevents mating between snails of opposing hands within the species (E) geographic separation of sinistral and dextral populations ’ ' Whidi of the following aceuratdy describes the rela= tionship between the evolutionary and develop- ' mental theories discussed in the passage? (A) Although the two theories reach the same conclusion, each is based on different assumptions. (B) They present contradictory explanations of the same phenomenon. '1' (C) The second theory accounts for certain phenomena that the first cannot explain. (D) The second theory demonstrates why the first is valid only for very unusual, special cases. (E) They are identical and interchangeable in that the second theory merely restate: the first in less technical terms. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. We..- Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is ‘ most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. IMPERMEABLE: (A) sandy (B) resilient (C) blunt (D) sticky (E) porous 29. SERRATED: (C) random (D) fragile (A) dull (B) smooth (E) tarnished 30. INGRATE: (B) polite person (D) witty person (A) thankful person (C) friendly person (E) wellcducated person 31., COALESCED: (A) spread rapidly (B) heated quickly (C) broken apart (D) uncovered (E) soaked 32. EFFRONTERY: (A) skepticism (B) serenity (C) timidity (D) conformity (E) impartiality 389 33. 34. 36. 37. 38. LACONIC: (C) insincere (A) stylized (D) verbose (B) unedited (E) outgoing HEGEMONY: (A) lack of authority (B) lack of energy (C) lack of precision (D) lack of confidence (E) lack of awareness PIQUE: (A) poke fun at (B) give hope to (C) neglect *(D) nullify (E) dissuade SUPPLICATE: (C) evade (A) misrepresent (B) demand (D) vacillate (E) discourage ENERVATE: (A) grant permission (B) provide assistance (C) make restitution (D) im'tate '(E) fortify VERISIMILAR: (A) implausible (B) digressing (C) monotonous CD) unusual (E) unique SECTION 4 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two 'blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that E fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. Vaillant, who has been particularly interested in the means by which people attain mental health, seems to be looking for answers: a way to close'the book on at least a few questions about human nature. ' (A) definitive (B) confused (C) tmporary (D) personal (E) derivative 2. The well-trained engineer must understand fields as diverse as physics, economics, geology, and soci- ology; thus, an overly engineering curriculum should be avoided. (A) narrow (B) innovative (C) competitive (D) rigorous (E) academic of 3. Although supemovas are among the most cosmic events, these stellar explosions are often hard to -———--, either because they are enormously far away or because they are dimmed by inter- vening dust and gas clouds. (A) remote,.observe (B) luminous. .detect (C) predictable. .foresee (D) ancient. .detcrmine (E) violent. .disregard 402 ‘ fruits of science but need not . Literature is inevitably a 4. During the widespread fuel shortage, the price of that suppliers were generally the consumer. gasoline was so thought to be (A) reactive. .shielding (B) stable. .blackmailing (C) depressed. .cheating (D) prohibitive. .placating (E) excessive. .gouging . Art -——- science, but that does not mean that the artist must also be a scientist; an artist uses the the theories from which they derive. (A) precedes. .anticipate (B) incorporates. .understand (C) transcends. .abandon (D) imitates. .repudiate (E) resembles. .contest . Imposing steep fines on employers for on-the-job injuries to workers could be an effective to creating a safer workplace, especially in the case of employers with poor safety records. (A) antidote (B) alternative (C) addition (D) deterrent (E) incentive rather than --- medium for the simple reason that writers interpOSe their own vision between the reader and reality. (A) distorting. .a neutral (B) transparent. .an opaque (C) colorful. .a drab , (D) flawless. .an inexact (E) flexible. .a rigid GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 12. SEDATIVE : PACI~FY\:: (A) Scalpel : cauten'ze (B) analgesiczdiscomfit (C) Surgery : operate Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in me original pair. 8. 10. ll. SCRIBBLE : WRITE :: (A) limpzwalk (B) draw: print. (C) mumble 2 talk (D) floatzswim (E) say : sing DETOXIFICATION : POISON :: (A) surge: current (B) diet : reduction (C) refinementzore (D) adjustment 2 focus (E) neutralizationzadd GRAVE]. : PEBBLE :: (A) river:water (B) seasoningzsalt (C) crowd: person (D) legislaturezbill (E) typewriterzkey STOCKADE : ENCLOSURE :: (A) moatzbridge (B) doorwayzwall I (C) brickzbuilding (D) pillar : support (E) keyholezlock 403 13. 14. 15. 16. (D) antiseptic : sterilize (E) Stimulant: induce AUTHORITATIVE : ACCEPTANCE :: (A) conspicuouszattention (B) nebulouszvalidation (C) congruouszappropriation (D) maudlin : passion (E) tangible:substance ALACRI'l'YzPROMPTzz (A) Service: kind (B) aggravationztemperamental (C) intuition:impulsive (D) acumenzshrewd . (E) Sentimentzthoughtful UNDERSCORE : EMPHASIS :: (A) eradicatezdestruction (B) sdgmatize:confrontat.ion (C) quantifyzassessment (D) .brand : ownership (E) logzrecord PREEMINENCE : IMPORTANCE :: (A) predestination:belief (B) prefigurationzreality'. (C) premeditation :execution- (D) predisposition:pran (E) ‘preponderanoezweight _ ‘ GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. (5) (10) 7152 Directions: Each passage in this group is folloWed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose 7 the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. Recently some scientists have concluded that mete- orites found on Earth and long believed to have a Martian origin might actually have been blasted free of Mars’s gravity by the impact on Mars of other meteor- ites. This conclusion has led to another question: whether meteorite impacts on Earth have similarly driven rocks from this planet to Mars. According to astronomer S.A. Phinney, kicking a rock hard enough to free it from Earth‘s gravity would require a meteorite capable of making a crater more than 60 miles across. Moreover, even if Earth rocks were freed by meteorite impact, Mars's orbit is much larger than Earth‘s, so Phinney estimates that the prob- ability of these rocks hitting Mars is about one-tenth as great as that of Mars‘s rocks hitting Earth. To demon- strate this estimate, Phinney used a computer to calcu- late where 1,000 hypothetical particles would go if ejected from Earth in random directions. He found that 17 of the 1,000 particles would hit Mars. 17. The passage is primarily concerned with (A) presenting an argument to support a particular hypothesis (13) suggesting an answer to a theoretical question (C) questioning the assumptions of a research project ' (D) criticizing experimental results (E) explaining the origin of certain scientific data 18. According to the passage, which of the following events may have initiated the process that led to the preSence on Earth of meteorites from Mars? (A) A meteorite struck the Earth with tremendous velocity. (B) A meteorite collided with Mars. (C) Approximately 1,000 rocks were ejected from Mars. (D) The orbits of Earth and Mars brought the planets to their closest points. (E) Rocks from a meteorite impact broke free of Earth’s gravity. 404 19. The passage suggests that which of the following is true concerning the probability that a rock, if ejected from Mars, will hit the Earth? (A) The probability is increased when particles are ejected from Mars in random directions. (B) The probability is increased by the presence of large craters on the surface of Mars. (C) The probability is decreased when Mars’s orbit brings the planet close to Earth. (D) The probability is greater than the probability . that a rock from Earth will hit Mars. (E) The probability is less than the probability that a rock from Earth will escape Earth's gravity. 20. Which of the following, if true, would cast most doubt on Phinney‘s estimate of the probability of Earth rocks hitting Mars? (A) Rather than going in random directions, about 25 percent of all particles ejected from Earth go in the same direction into space. (B) Approximately 100 meteorites large enough to make a noticeable crater hit the Earth each year. - (C) No rocks of Earth origin have been detected on Mars. - . (D) The velocity of rocks escaping from Earth’s gravity is lower than the velocity of meteor- ites hitting the Earth. (12) No craters more than 60 miles across have been found on Mars. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. DH! 15) (/0) (15) (20) . uqu V (25) (30) (35) (4a) (‘5) A “scientistic” view of language was dominant among philosophers and linguists who affected to develop a scientific analysis of human thought and behavior in the early part of this century. Under the force of this view, it was perhaps inevitable that the art of rhetoric should pass from the status of being regarded as of questionable worth (because although it might be both a source of pleasure and a means to urge people to right action, it might also be a means to distort truth and a source of misguided action) to the status of being wholly condemned. If people are regarded only as machines guided by logic, as they were by these “scientistic” thinkers, rhetoric is likely to be held in low regard; for the most obvious truth about rhetoric is that it speaks to the whole person. It presents its arguments first to the person as a rational being, because persuasive discourse, if honestly conceived, always has a basis in reasoning. Logical argument is the plot. as it were, of any speech or essay that is respect- fully intended to persuade people. Yet it is a character- izing feature of rhetoric that it goes beyond this and appeals to the parts of our nature that are involved in feeling, desiring, acting, and suffering. It recalls relevant instances of the emotional reactions of people to circumstances—real or fictional—that are similar to our own circumstances. Such is the purpose of both historical accounts and fables in persuasive discourSe: they indicate literally or symbolically how people may react emotionally, with hope or fear, to particular circumstances. A speech attempting to persuade people can achieve little unless it takes into account the aspect of their being related to such hopes and fears. Rhetoric, then, is addressed to human beings living at particular times and in particular places. From the point of View of rhetoric, we are not merely logical thinking machines, creatures abstracted from time and space. The study of rhetoric should therefore be consid- ered the most humanistic of the humanities, since rhetoric is not directed only to our rational selves. It takes into account what the “scientistic” view leaves out. If it is a weakness to harbor feelings, then rhetoric may be thought of as dealing in weakness. But‘ those who reject the idea of rhetoric because they believe it deals in lies and who at the same time hope to move people to action, must either be liars themselves or be very naive; pure logic has never been a motivating force unless it has been subordinated to human purposes, feelings, and desires, and thereby ceased to be pure logic. 405 ll. 22. 24. According to the passage, to reject rhetoric and still hope to persuade pe‘ople is (A) an aim of most speakers and writers (B) an indication either of dishonesty or of credulity (C) a way of displaying distrust of the audience’s motives (D) a characteristic of most humanistic discourse (E) a way of avoiding excessively abstract reasoning . It can be inferred from the passage that in the late nineteenth century rhetoric was regarded as (A) the only necessary element of persuasive discourse (B) a dubious art in at least two ways (C) an outmoded and tedious amplification of logic (D) an open offense to the rational mind (E) the most important of the humanistic studies . The passage suggests that the disparagement of rhetoric by some people can be traced to their (A) reaction against science (B) lack of training in logic (C) desire to persuade people as completely as possible . (D) misunderstanding ~of the use of the term “scien- tistic” (E) view of human motivation The passage suggests that a speech that attemps to persuade people to act is likely to fail if it‘does NOT (A) distort the truth a little to make it more accept- able to the audience (B) appeal to the self-interest as well as the human- itarianism of the audience g (C) address listeners’ emotions as well as their: intellects . ' - . - (D) concede the logic of other points of View (E) show how an immediately desirable action is consistent with timeless principles The passage suggests that to consider people. as. “thinking machines” (line 37) is to consider them as (A) beings separated from a historical context (B) _ replaceable parts of a larger social machine (C) more complex than other animals (D) liars rather than honest people (E) infallible in their msoning GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE 26. Which of the following persuasive devices is NOT used in the passage? (A) A sample of an actual speech delivered by an orator (B) The contrast of different points of view (C) The repetition of key‘ideas and expressions (D) An analogy that seeks to explain logical argu- ment - (E) Evaluative or judgmental words \ 27, Which of; following best states the author‘s ' main point about logical argument? (A) It is a sterile, abstract discipline, of little use in' real life. (B) It is an essential element of persuasive discourse, but only one such element. (C) 'It is an important means of persuading people to act against their desires. (D) It is the lowest order of discourse because it is the least imaginative. (E) It is essential to persuasive discourse because it deals with universal truths. Go ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. .w......‘-... .— Directions: Each question below consists ofa word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 23. FLAMBOYANT: (B) independent (D) subdued (A) competent (C) aloof (E) unafraid 29‘ REBUFF: (C) meddle (A) tease (D) welcome (B) defy (E) challenge 30. ENRICH: (C) forfeit (A) deplete (B) mitigate (D) extinguish (E) occlude 3l. PRETERNATURAL: (A) constant (B) protracted (C) factual (D) restrained (E) ordinary 32. GERMANE: ‘ (A) domestic. (B) sympathetic (C) contr0versial (D) profound (E) inappropriate 33. INIEGRITY: (A) extravagance (B) incompleteness (C) subordinancy (D) insufficiency (E) opposition 34. MENDACITY : (A) full supply (B) loud response (C) impunity (D) truthfulness (E) peculiarity 35. VITUPERATE: (C) animate (A) restore (D) praise (B) respect (E) intensify 36. TEETOTALISM‘: (A) jingoism (B) proclivity (C) intemperancc (D) intolerance (E) liberalism 37. REFULGENT: (C) plodding (A) lackluster (D) distant (B) stiff (E) weary 38. PRQPITIATE: (A) elate (B) pester (C) incense (D) distract (E) forgive FOR GENERAL TEST 10 ONLY k ‘ Answer Key and Percentages' of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly comm mun mn- uumn-r Am r. mm Am Ill mull Ian 1 E 1 A A 85 1 B 70 1 D 93 1 D 1 79 2 D 2 A C 88 2 B 87 C A ' 77 3 C 3 B A 74 3 C 32 B D 4 C 4 E B 72 4 A 75 D E 5 B 5 B D 76 5 D 79 ' C B 6 A 5 E C 70 6 A 78 A B 59 7 D 7 A A 73 7 C 75 D C 70 8 B 8 C B 78 8 C 53 E D 30 9 C 9 E B 66 9 B 57 B A 86 10 E 10 C A 66 10 A 49 B E 53 D 11 D D 55 1 1 D 58 A B 88 E 12 D B 33 12 C 49 C A 72 A 13 A D 25 13 A 33 A C 57 E 14 D C 32 14 D 36 E D 56 E 15 D C 39 15 C 33 A D 38 D 16 E C 38 16 E 85 A E 26 E 17 B D 70 17 D 89 D E 54 D 1 B B C 66 1 B C 79 A B 52 E 19 _ D B 50 19 A 63 A C 50 A 20 A A 50 20 C 53 E B 52 E 21 B B 87 21 E 75 D D 31 B 22 B E 75 22 B 67 E E 33 C 23 E D 64 23 D 71 B E 45 D 24 C D 50 24 C 58 D A 18 C 25 A A 25 25 D 43 B A 55 B 28 A 84 B 64 26 B 43 C 27 B 60 A 61 27 A 42 E 28 D 91 B 44 28 E 33 B B D ~ 77 D 26 29 E 20 A 30 A 90 E 26 30 D 32 C 31 E 53 C 32 E 40 D 33 B 42 A 34 D 42 D 35 D 33 ~ 8 38 C 35 E 37 A 33 A 38 C 23 'EstimalodPmeagmapofmmthfiEWTwhammemod. LUSKI‘VU' 421 ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/02/2010 for the course SADAS saas taught by Professor Asa during the Spring '09 term at Punjab Engineering College.

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Bigbook_10 - TEST 10 ' ‘ ‘ SECTION 1 Time—30 minutes...

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