Bigbook_11 - SECTION 3 Time—3O minutes 38 Questions...

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Unformatted text preview: SECTION 3 Time—3O minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are live lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that fit fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. With its maverick approach to the subject, Shere Hite's book has been more widely debated than most; the media throughoutthe‘country have brought the author’s opinions to the public’s attention. ' (A) controversial (B) authoritative (C) popular (D) conclusive (E) articulate 2. Though many medieval women posSessed devotional books that had belonged to their mothers, formal written evidence of women bequeathing books to their daughters is scarce, which suggests that such bequests were --— and required no . (A) unselfish. .rationalization (B) tangential. .approval (C) customary. .documentation (D) covert. .discretion (E) spurious. .record 3. Although their initial anger had --—- somewhat, they continued to the careless worker who had broken the machine. (A) blazed. .assail (B) diminished. .appease (C) abated. .berate (D) subsided. .condone (E) intensified.r.torment 434 4. ‘I \ Borrowing a copyrighted book from a library amounts to‘ a form of theft ~.— by entrenched » custom: ' the copyright owner’s property; the book, is used repeatedly without for such use. (A) engendered. .application (B) anticipated. .acknowledgrnent (C) sanctioned. .compensation (D) provoked. .adjustment (E) perpetrated. .pennission . The nOIion that a parasite am alter the behavior of a host organism is not mere fiction; indeed, the phenomenon is not even (A) observable (B) real _ (C) comprehended (D) rare (E) imaginable " Although Shakespeare received little formal educa- tion, scholarship has in recent years the view that he was the work of classical authors. (A) substantiated. .unimpressed by (B) eroded. .obsessed by (C) supported. .oblivious to (D) questioned. .influenced by (E) undermined. .unfamiliar with Darwin’s method did not really the idea of race as an important conceptual category; even the much more central idea of species was little more than a theoretical (A) require. convenience (B) apply. .measurement (C) exclude. .pr'actice (D) subsume. .validatiorr (E) reject. .fact GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expressesa relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. DENTURE2TEETH :: (A) scarf:head 10. ll. 12. (B) toupee : hair (C) fingernail : hand (D) eyebrowzeye (E) bandage2wound PROFESSIONAL : ROOKIE :: (A) player: fan (B) ranger:cowhand (C) prisoner: thief (D) soldier: recruit (E) conductor: musician SCRlP’T : PLAY 2: (A) refrain : song (B) assignmenttcourse (C) scorersymphony (D) collection : story (E) debate : candidate BUOYANT25INK :: (A) frozenzmelt (B) liquidzevaporate (C) brittle2cleave (D) insolubletdissolve: (E) gaseouszexpand CRAWLzPROCEED :: (A) plummetzdescend (B) nurture:grow (C) inundate2flood (D) rampagezdestroy (E) dwindle:decrease 435 [3. l4. ' (B) relief : form 15. ‘16. \ \ ELEGY : SORROW :: (A) paean : distress (B) encomium:criticism (C) requiem : euphoria (D) tirade: joy (E) eulogyzadmiration FRIEZE : ORNAMENT :: (A) arch : divide (C) arabesque1aocenruate (D) navezborder (E) pillarzsupport DECELERATE : SPEED ::“ (A) desiccatezdryness (B) extinguish: oxygen (C) interpolate: interval (D) decontaminate : sterility (E) enervate:vitality DESPOTIC : TYRAN'NY :: (A) authoritarian : superiority (B) skillfulzcelebrity (C) generouszliberality (D) smpect:illegality (E) peaceful:benevolence - GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. i5) {10) {15) Directions: Each passage in this group is followedby questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. (The article from which the passage was taken appeared in 1982.) t . Theorists are divided concerning the origin of the Moon. Some hypothesize that the Moon was formed in the same way as were the planets in the inner solar system (Mercury, Venus, Mars, and Earth)—from planet-fonning materials in the presolar nebula. But, unlike the cores of the inner planets, the Moon’s core contains little or no iron, while the typical planet- , forming materials were quite rich in iron. Other theorists propose that the Moon was ripped out of the Earth's rocky mantle by the Earth's collison with another large celestial body after much of the Earth’s iron fell to its core. One problem with the collision hypothesis is the question of how a satellite formed in this way could have settled into the nearly circular orbit that the Moon has today. Fortunately, the collision hypothesis is testable. If it is true, the mantlerocks of the Moon and the Earth should be the same geochemically. 17. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) present two hypotheses concerning the origin of the Moon (B) discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the collision hypothesis conoeming the origin of the Moon V (C) propose that hypotheses concerning the Moon's origin be tested (D) argue that the Moon could not have been formed out of the typical planet-forming materials of the presolar nebula (E) describe one reason why the Moon's geochem- ical makeup should resemble that of the Earth 18. According to the passage, Mars and the Earth are similar in which of the following ways? I. Their satellites were formed by collisions with other celestial bodies. II. Their cores contain iron. III. They were formed from the presolar nebula. ' (A) III only , (B) I and II only (C) I and 111 only (D) II and III only (E) I, II, and III 436 19. The author implies that a nearly circular orbit is unlikely for a satellite that (A) circles one of the inner planets (B) is deficient in iron (C) is different from its planet geochemically (D) was formed by a collision between two celestial bodies . (E) was formed out of the planet-forming materials in the presolar nebula . Which of the following, if true, would be most likely to make it difficult to verify the collision hypothesis in the manner suggested by the author? (A) The Moon's core and mantlerock are almost inactive geologically. (B) The mantlerock of the Earth has changed in composition since the formation of the . Moon, while the mantlerock of the Moon has remained chemically inert. (C) Much of the Earth‘s iron fell to the Earth's core long before the formation of the Moon. after which the Earth’s mantlerockremained unchanged. (D) Certain of the Earth's elements, such as plat- inum, gold, and iridium, followed iron to the Earth’s core. (E) The mantlerock of the Moon contains elements such as platinum. gold, and iridium. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Ln»: /10) (I5) (20) 125) (30) (35/ 140) (45) (50) Surprisingly enough. modern historians have rarely interested themselves in the history of the American South in the period before the South began to become self-consciously and distinctively “Southem"—the decades after l8l5. Consequently, the cultural history of Britain's North American empire in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries has been written almost as if the Southern colonies had never existed. The American culture that emerged during the Colonial and Revolu- tionary eras has been depicted as having been simply an extension of New England Puritan culture. However, Professor Davis has recently argued that the South stood apart from the rest of American society during this early period. following its own unique pattern of cultural - development. The case for Southern distinctiveness rests upon two related premises: first, that the cultural simi- larities among the five Southern colonies were far more impressive than the differences. and second. that what made those colonies alike also made them different from the other colonies. The first, for which Davis offers an enormous amount of evidence, can be accepted without major reservations; the second is far more problematic. What makes the second premise problematic is the use of the Puritan colonies as a basis for comparison. Quite properly. Davis decries the excessive influence ascribed by historians to the Puritans in the formation of American culture. Yet Davis inadvertently adds weight to such ascriptions by using the Puritans as the Standard against which to assess the achievements and contributions of Southern colonials. Throughout, Davis focuses on the important. and undeniable, differences between the Southern and Puritan colonies in motives for and patterns of early settlement, in attitudes toward nature and Native Americans, and in the degree of receptivity to metropolitan cultural influences. However, recent scholarship has strongly suggested that those aspects of early New England culture that ' seem to have been most distinctly Puritan; such as the strong religious orientation and the communal impulse, were not even typical of New England as a whole, but were largely confined to the two colonies of Massachu- setts and Connecticut. This, what in contrast to the Puritan colonies appears to Davis to be peculiarly Southem—afiuisitiveness, a strong interest in politics and the law, and a tendency to cultivate'metropolitan cultural models—was not only more typically English 4‘ than the cultural patterns exhibited by Puritan Massa- chusetts and Connecticut, but also almost certainly char- ' acterisu'c of most other early modern British colonies from Barbados north to Rhode Island and New Hamp- shire. Within the larger framework of American colonial life, then, not the Southern but the Puritan colonies . appear to have been distinctive, and even they seem to have been rapidly assimilating to the dominant cultural patterns by the late Colonial period. I 437? ‘ x 21. The author is primarily conmrned with (A) refuting a claim about the influence of Puritan culture on the early American South (8) refuting a thesis about the distinctiveness of the culture of the early American South (C) refuting the two premises that underlie Davis’ discussion of the culture of the Amerimn _ South in the period before 1815 (D) challenging the hypothesis that early American culture was homogeneous in nature (E) challenging the contention that the American South made greater contributions to early American culture than Puritan New Eng- land did a 22. The passage implies that the attitudes toward Native Americans that prevailed in the Southern colonies (A) were in conflict with the cosmopolitan outlook of the South ' ' , (B) derived from Southerners’ strong interest in the law (C) were modeled after those that prevailed in the North - (D) differed from those that prevailed in the Puritan colonies , ‘ '- (E) developed as a response to attitudes that pre« vailed in Massachusetts and Connecticut 23. According to the author. the depiction of American culture during the Colonial and Revolutionary eras as an extension of New England Puritan culture reflects the - ' ‘ t (A) fact that historians have overestimated the importance of the- Puritans in the develop— mentofAmerican culture 7' r * (B) fact'that early American culture was deeply by the strong religious orientation of the colonists ' . _ '- ' (C)' failure to recognize important and undeniable cultural differences between New Hampshire and Rhode Island on the one hand and the Southern colonies 'on the other ' ’ (D),4extent to which Massachusetts and Connecticut ‘ served’as cultural models for the other Amer~ , icancolonies. : ., __ I - (E) . extenLto_whidL'oolonial Ainerica resisted assim- ilating cultural patterns that were typically English 1 i ’ GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 24. 25. The authorof the passage is in agreement with which of the following elements of Davis’ book? I. Davis’ claim that acquisitiveness was a characteristic unique to the South during the Colonial period . Davis’ argument that there were significant differences between Puritan and Southern culture during the Colonial period Davis‘ thesis that the Southern colonies shared a common culture (A) Ionly (B) II only. (C) 111 only (D) I and II only (E) II and III only II. III. It can be inferred from the passage that the author would find Davis' second premise (lines 18-20) more plausible if it were true that (A) Puritan culture had displayed the tendency characteristic of the South to cultivate metropolitan cultural models (B) Puritan culture had been dominant in all the non-Southern colonies during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries (C) the communal impulse and a strong religious orientation had been more prevalent in the South (D) the various cultural patterns of the Southern - colonies had more closely resembled each other ' (E) the cultural patterns characteristic of most early modern British colonies had also been char- acteristic of the Puritan colonies 438 26. 27. t ‘1 The passage suggests that by the late Colonial period the tendency to cultivate metropolitan cultural models was a cultural pattern that was (A) dying out as Puritan influence began to grow (B) self-consciously and distinctively Southern (C) spreading to Massachusetts and Connecticut (D) more characteristic of the Southern colonies than of England (E) beginning to spread to Rhode Island and New Hampshire Which of the following statements could most logi- cally follow the last sentence of the passage? (A) Thus, had more attention been paid to the evidence, Davis would not have been tempted to argue that the culture of the South diverged greatly from Puritan culture in the ” seventeenth century. (B) Thus, convergence, not divergence. seems to have characterized the cultural development of the American colonies in the eighteenth century. (C) Thus, without the cultural diversity represented by the American South, the culture of colo- ‘ nial America would- certainly have been homogeneous in nature. ' (D) Thus, the contribution of Southern colonials to Amerimn culture was certainly overshad- owed by that of the Puritans. (E) Thus, the culture of America during the Colo- nial period was far more sensitive to outside influences than historians are accustomed to acknowledge. ‘ GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists ofa word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. (B) indignity (E) im'tation 28. HARMONY: (A) dishonesty (C) insecurity (D) discord 29. (B) taut (E) shattered SLACK: (A) twisted (C) compact (D) durable JOCULAR: (A) active (B) serious (C) unknown (D) equable (E) destructive 30. 31. IMPEDE: (A) assist (B) entreat (C) dislodge (D) ascn'be (E) avow 32. SAP: (A) fortify (C) lend credence (E) draw out (B) alleviate (D) hold fast 439 33. 34. 35. 36. 38. CONTROL: (A) minor variable (B) weak assumption ‘ (C) improper simulation (D) group experimented on (E) expression substituted for RECONDITE: (A) intended (B) defeated (C) widely understood (D) freely dispensed (E) recently discovered lNlMlTABLE: (A) inclined to disagree (B) unwilling to compete (C) eager to advise (D) intelligible (E) ordinary DlSlNTER: (A) restrain (B) confiscate (C) resist (D) bury (E) fund DIATRIBE: (A) laudatory piece of writing (B) formal speech by one person (C) written agreement (D) farewell address (E) witty poem HOODWINK: (A) explain (C) lead (D) disregard (B) shock (E) disabuse SECTION 6 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are live lettered words or sets of words. Choos: the word or set of words for each blank that b_es__t fits the meaning of the Sentence as a whole. 3 I)? I. The functions of the hands. eyes, and brain are so ——-—- that using the hands during early childhood helps to promote the child’s entire develop- ment. (A) intertwined. perceptual (B) unalterable. .intellectual (C) enigmatic. .psychological (D) regulated. .adolescent (E) individualized. .social 2. Before 1500 North America was inhabited by more than 300 cultural groups. each with dif- ferent customs. social structures, world views, and languages; such diversity the existence of a single Native American culture. (A) complements (B) implies (C) reiterates (D) argues‘against (E) explains away 3; That dealers —------ enough to nurture a young modern painter‘s career rather than plunder it exist is not impossible. but the public’s ——--- appetite for modern art makes such dealers less and less likely. (A) chivalrous. .discriminating (B) magnanimous. .quirky (C) patient. .insatiable (D) cynical. .finicky (E) reckless. .zealous 4. In the absence of any -—---- caused by danger. hard- , ship, or even cultural difference, most utopian communities deteriorate into ---- -- but enervating backwaters. (A) turmoil. .frantic (B) mistrust. .nai've (C) amelioration. .ignorant (D) decimation. .intrusive (E) stimulation. .placid 5. As’Juanita argued, this new code of conduct is laughable; its principles are either -—-, Offering no wisdom but the obvious. or are so devoid of specific advice as to make almost any action (A) irresolute..unlikely (B) corroborative. .redundant (C) platitudinous. .justifiable (D) homogeneous. .impartial (E) labyrinthine. .unacceptable . Histocompatibiljty antigens that attack foreign tissue in the body cannot have been through evolution expressly to —--— organ transplantation; on the contrary. they have been found to facilitate many essential biological functions. (A) designed. .retain- (B) produced. .a.id - (C) developed. .enhance (D) selected. .promote (E) conserved. .foil . Their air of cheerful self-sacrifice and endless complaisance won them undeserved praise. for their seeming gallantry was wholly motivated by a wish to avoid conflict of any sort. (A) poignant (B) sincere (C) plaintive (D) laudable (E) Craven GO ON TO THE NEXT‘ PAGE. Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs 0f words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. RUST 2 CORROSION 22 (A) vapor 2 flammability (B) dew 2 condensation (C) crystal 2 purification (D) solution : precipitation (E) mold : disinfection 9. CLAIM : LEGITIMATED 22 (A) hypothesis 2 confirmed (B) verdict 2 appealed (C) counterargument 2 doubted (D) proposition 2 repeated (E) speculation 2 disbelieved 10. ENCLOSE: PARENTHESES 2: (A) abbreviate: brackets (B) emphasize 2 hyphen (C) separate 2 comma (D) join 2 period (E) omit 2 colon ll. ANTENNA : SIGNAL 1: (A) bread 2-gmin (B) story : reporter (C) stem2fiower (D) net 2 fish (E) telegramzsender 453 l2 l4. l6. . WAG; HUMOROUS:: (A) ruffian : frightened (B) spendthrift : inattentive (C) dolt : stupid (D) pirate : merciless (E) sinner 2 repentant FIRM_: IRONCLAD 22 (A) bruised : broken (B), polished : shining (C) smart 2 brilliant (D) hard 2 stilT (E) jovial '. merry FOIL : METAL :: (A) pebble 2 concrete (B) suedezleather (C) glaze : pottery (D) veneer 2 wood (E) paper2cardboard i LEAVE 2 ABSCOND2: (A) take2steal (B) evacuatezfiee (C) interest:astound (D) build: renovate (E) evaluate2downgrade QUAFF 2 SIP 2: (A) bolt 2 run (13) punch 2 hit (C) gnaw 2 nibble (D) trudge :plod (E) stride 2 mince ' GO ON TO THE'NEXT PAGE. Line (5) (10) (15) (20) (25) (30) (35) (40). (45) (50) Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose. the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. A For some time scientists have believed that choles- terol plays a major role in heart disease because people with familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic defect, have six to eight times the normal level of cholsterol in their blood and they invariably develop heart disease. These people lack cell-surface receptors for low-density lipo- proteins (LDL’s), which are the fundamental carriers of blood cholesterol to the body cells that use choles- terol. Without an adequate number. of cell-surface recep- tors to remove LDL's from the blood, the cholesterol- carrying LDL’s remain in the blood, increasing blood cholesterol levels. Scientists also noticed that people with familial hypercholesterolemia appear to produce more LDL’s than normal individuals? How, scientists wondered, could a genetic mutation that causes a slow- down in the removal of LDL’s from the blood also result in an increase in the synthesis of this cholesterol- carrying protein? - Since scientists could not experiment on human body tissue, their knowledge of familial hypemholesterolemia was severely However, a breakthrough tame in the laboratories of Yoshio Watanabe of Kobe University in Japan in 1980. Watanabe noticed that a male rabbit in his-colony had ten tims the normal concentration of cholesterol in its blood. By appropriate breeding, Watanabe obtained a strain of rabbits that had very high cholesterol levels. These rabbits spontaneously developed heart disease. To his surprise, Watanabe further found that the rabbits, like humans with familial hypercholes- terolemia, lacked LDL receptors. Thus, scientists could study these Watanabe rabbits to gain a better under- standing of familial hypercholesterolernia in humans. Prior to the breakthrough at Kobe University, it was known that LDL’s are secreted from the liver in the form of a precursor, called very low-density lipo- proteins (V LDL’s), which carry triglycerides as well as relatively small amounts of cholesterol. The triglyc- erides are removed from the VLDL’s by fatty and othe; tissues. What remains is a remnant particle that must be removed from the blood. What scientists learned by studying the Watanabe rabbits is that the removal of the VLDL remnant requires the LDL receptor. Nor- mally, the majority of the VLDL remnants go to the liver where they bind to LDL receptors and are de- graded. In the Watanabe rabbit, due to a lack of LDL receptors on liver cells, the VLDL remnants remain in the blood and are eventually converted to LDL’s. The LDL receptors thus have a dual effect in controlling LDL levels. They are necessary to prevent oversynthesis of LDL’s from VLDL remnants and they are necessary for the normal removal of L L’s from the blood. With this knowledge, scientists are now well on the way to- ward developing drugs that dramatically lower choles- terol levels in people afflicted with certain forms of familial hypercholesterolemia. 454 17. In the passage, the author is prim" arily concerned with r (A) presenting a hypothesis and describing compelling evidence in support of it (B) raising a question and describing an important discovery that led to an answer (C) showing that a certain genetically caused disease can be treated effectively with drugs (D) explaining what causes the genetic mutation that leads to heart disease (E) discussing the importance of research on animals for the study of human disease 18. Which of the following drugs, if developed, would most likely be an example of the kind of drug mentioned in line 53 7 (A) A drug that stimulates the production of VLDL remnants (B) A drug that stimulates the production of LDL receptors on the liver (C) A drug that stimulates the production of an enzyme needed for cholesterol production (D) A drug that suppresses the production of body cells that use cholesterol (E) A drug that prevents triglycerids from attaching to VLDL’s 19. The passage supplies information to answer which of the following questions? (A) Which body cells are the primary users of cholesterol? (B) How did scientists discover that LDL’s are secreted from the liver in the form of a precursor? (C) Where in the body are VLDL remnants degraded? (D) Which body tissues produce triglycerids? (E) What techniques are used to determine the pres- ence or absence of cell-surface receptors? GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 20. According to the passage, by studying the Watanabe 21. rabbits scientists learned that (A) VLDL remnants are removed from the blood by LDL receptors in the liver - (B) LDL’s are secreted from the liver in the form of precursors called VLDL’s (C) VLDL remnant particles contain small amounts of cholesterol (D) triglycerides are removed fr0m VLDL’s by fatty tissues (E) LDL receptors remove LDL’s from the blood The development of drug treatments for some forms of familial hypercholesterolemia is regarded by the author as (A) possible, but not very important (B) interesting, but too costly to be practical (C) promising, but many years off (D) extremely unlikely‘ (E) highly probable 455 i 22. The passage implies that if the Watanabe rabbits 23. had had as many LDL receptors on their livers as do normal rabbits, the Watanabe rabbits would have been ‘ (A) less likely than normal rabbits to develop heart disease . (B) less likely than normal rabbits to develop high concentrations of cholesterol in their blood (C) less useful than they actually were to scientists in the study of familial hypercholesterolemia in humans (D) unable to secrete VLDL's from their livers (E) immune to drugs that lower cholesterol levels in people with certain forms of familial hyper- cholesterolemia The passage implies that Watanabe rabbits differ from normal rabbits in which of the following ways? (A) Watanabe rabbits have more LDL receptors than do normal rabbits. (B) The blood of Watanabe rabbits contains more VLDL remnants than does the blood of normal rabbits. (C) Watanabe rabbits have fewer fatty tissues than do normal rabbits. (D) Watanabe rabbits secrete lower levels of ~ VLDL‘s than do nOrrnal rabbits. (E) The blood of Watanabe rabbits contains fewer LDL’s than does the blood of normal rabbits. ._ GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Line {5) (10) {15} (20) (The article from which this passage was taken appeared in 1981.) - When speaking of Romare Bearden, one is tempted to say, “A great Black American artist.” The subject matter of deen’s collages is certainly Black. Por- trayals of the folk of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, whom he remembers from early childhood, of the jazz‘musicians and tenement roofs of his Harlem days, of Pittsburgh steelworkers, and his reconstruction of classical Greek myths in the guise of the ancient Black kingdom of Benin, attest to this. In natural harmony with this choice of subject matter are the social sensibili- ties of the artist, who remains active today with the Cinque Gallery in Manhattan, which he helped found and which is devoted to showing the work of minority artists. . v Thenwhy not call Bearden a Black American artist? Because ultimately this categorization is too narrow. “What stands up in the end is structure," Bearden says. “What I try to do’is amplify. III were just creating a picture of a farm woman from back home, it would have meaning to her and people there. But art amplifies itself to something universal." ' ‘ 24. According to the passage, all'of the following are depicted in Bearden’s collages EXCEPT (A) workers in Pittsburgh‘s steel mills (B) scenes set in the ancient kingdom of Benin (C) people Bearden knew as a child (D) traditional representations of the classical heroes of Greekmythology (E) the jaz musicians of the Harlem Bearden used to know 456 25. 26. 27. The author suggests that Bearden should not be called a Black American artiSt because (A) there are many collages by Bearden in which the subject matter is not Black (B) Bearden's work reflects the Black American experience in a highly individual style ' (C) through the structure of Bearden's art his Black subjects come to represent all of humankind (D) Bearden’s true significance lies not so much 1?: his own work as in his efforts to help other minority artists _ (E) much of Bearden’s work uses the ancient Black kingdom of Benin for its setting . Bearden‘s social sensibilities and subject matter of his collages are mentioned by the author in order to explain (A) why one might be tempted to call Harden a Black American artist (B) why Bearden cannot be readily categorized (C) why Bearden’s appeal is thought by many to be ultimately universal ’ . (D) how deeply an artist’s artistic creations are influenced by the artist's social conscience (E) what makes Bearden unique among contempo- rary Black American artists The author of the passage is chiefly concerned with (A) discussing Bearden‘s philosophy of art (B) assessing the significance of the ethnic element in Bearden's work (C) acknowledging Bearden’s success in giving artistic expression to the Black American experience ‘ (D) pointing out Bearden’s helpfulness to other minority artists ‘ (E) tracing Bearden’s progress toward artistic matu— nty - GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters. f0110wed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which;orie is best. 28. 29. 30. 31. INSERT: (A) remove (B) improve (C) revise (D) lessen (E) copy BANKRUPTCY: (A) hypocrisy (B) solvency (C) advocacy (D) comparability (E) adversity RELEVANT: (A) immaterial (B) random (C) hidden (D) false (E) inopportune IMPLOSION: (A) high-frequency pitch (B) violent chemical reaction (C) rapid outward movement (D) complete change in composition (E) uncontrolled variation in temperature ' 457 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. . SLAB: (A) nib (B) ‘streak (E) shield (C) husk (D) sliver KAREFY: (A) contract suddenly (B) converge slowly (C) blend thoroughly (D) make denser (E) cool quickly IMPETUOUS: (A) appropriate (B) respectful (C) uninteresting (D) voracious (E) deliberate VITUPERATIVE: (A) suggestive (B) complimentary (C) genuine (D) undirected (E) pessimistic FCMENT: (A) squelch (B) sweeten (C) dilute (D) liberate (E) clear INCHOATE: (A) explicit (C) pragmatic (B) dependable (D) therapeutic (E) enduring, TYRO: (A) underling (B) expert (C) eccentric (D) truthful person (E) beneficentruler FOR GENERAL TEST 11 ONLY l Answer Key and Percentages" of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly veam Aale aummmvz ABILITY ANALYTICAL ABIUTY Imm— _a OUMVG UI#UM-‘ 8 #3871215 3524388 {8888 um” 8‘444'.._._._a_. _‘ v u oaum unt-uM—I ommxun mbund N h >oomo momma: m>Doo >m>o> mmowm " mmmmm OD>UJ> mmoom >m00m O>ODO N UI omomm Down)» mo>mo >Om>o mom>o O>m>> 83%33 NfiBB'X BEE-5:33 318$: Sn:me album-t >>m>0 m>000 moomm o>oo> owmoo m>m>m 333T? £83388 871323 88835 23133:] 33888 m>> mmooo >m>m> ooumm >ommm >oooo O>mmm omoo> {38368; 228:8}! Rm 5383 938231 83883. Baum 3187M: #38833 {8 A C C C D E A B D C D E E E E C A D D B B D A E B C B D B B A A D C E D A E 'Estimaled P+ (or the group 0! examinees who took the GHE General To: in a ream three-year period. 458 1 ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/02/2010 for the course SADAS saas taught by Professor Asa during the Spring '09 term at Punjab Engineering College.

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Bigbook_11 - SECTION 3 Time—3O minutes 38 Questions...

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