Bigbook_12 - SECTION 3 Time—3O minutes . ' ——"'...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
Background image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: SECTION 3 Time—3O minutes . ' ——"' 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, 5. Some paleontologists debate whether the diversity of each blank indicating that something has been omitted. species has since the cambrian period, or Beneath the Sentence are five lettered words or sets of whether imperfections in the fossil record only words, Choose the word or set of words for each blank suggest greater diversity today, while in actuality that Ems the meaning of the sentence as a whole. there has been either or decreased diversity. ' (A) changed. .escalation 1. By idiosynaadmfly refusing to dismis an insub- (B) increased.\.stasis ordinate member of his staff, the manager not (C) expanded. .disconn'nuity only established policy, but he also (D) declined. .reduction his heretofore good chances for promotion. ' (E) improved. .deviation (A) instituted. .bettered , (B) recognized. .protected . 6. Manipulating laboratory tissue cultures with (C) contmvened. .jeopardized ' hormones is one thing; using hormones to trmt I (D) reiterated; .computed‘ " human beings, however, is contingent on whether (E) delimited. .restricted hormones that in the laboratory can affect organisms, and in predictable ways. 2. Congress is having great difficulty developing (A) develop. .similar a consensus on energy policy, primarily because (B) succeed. .simpler the policy objectives of various members of (C) fail. .cellular assumptions. (D) work. .whole Congress rest on such ._ (E) reproduce. .unknown (A) commonplace (B) trivial (C) explicit (D) divergent (E) fundamental 7. The astronomer and feminist Maria Mitchell’s own prodigious activity and the vigor of the Association for the Advancement of Women during the 1870‘s any assertion that feminism was in that period. (A) exclude. .thriving (B) contradict. .prospering (C) pervade. .remote (D) buttress. .dormant (E) belie. .quiescent 3. The widespread public shock at the news of the guilty verdict was caused partly by news stories that had acquittal. (A) sensational. .condemned (B) buried. .urged (C) impartial. .mentioned (D) biased. .predicted (E) local. .denounoed 4. The idealized paintings of nature produced in the eighteenth century are evidence that the medieval -—-—-- natural settings had been and that the outdoors now could be enjoyed without trepidation. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. (A) fear of. .exorcised (B) concerns about. .regained (C) affection for. .surmounted (D) disinterest in. .alleviated (E) enthusiasm for. .confronted 472 Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 3. ABSORB : SPONGE :: (A) spinzwool ’ (B) stain:detergent (C) pump : gasoline (D) seal : caulk ’ _ (E) sharpenzpencil 9. DALLY:’I'IME:: (A) trespasszland (B) squander:money (C) shirk : task' (D) achieve: victory (E) harborsaafetv... . 10. KMT:YARN:: (A) damzsock (B) plait:ha.ir (C) crochetzhook (D) braid : knot‘ “ (E) weave : loom 11. DECIBEthoUDNEss: ‘ ' (A) circumference2circle (B)? spectrum : color (0 light-year : distaste « (D)_ meter : mile ) v: (E) clock: duration} :3! 12. EMBEZZLEzFUNDS :: (A) wieldzinfluence (B) exploit : victim (C) usurp':power (D) 4» overcome : combatant (E) impede :‘obstacle ‘ I, 473 l3. 14. 15. 16. NEOPHYTE : EXPERIENCE :: (A) diplomat : negotiation (B) misanthrope : cynicism _ (C) umpire : reconciliation (D) guru : respect (E) 'boor : sensitivity REFINE : PURIFICATION :: (A) deflect : conformity (B) attenuate-:rarefaction (C) regenerate: sustenance A (D) standardize : discontinuation ' (E) dilatez'contraction " MELODRAMA : SUBTLE‘I'Y :: (A) chimera : authenticity (B) parodyzwit (C) war :strategy (D) [brief : abstract (mihypoihesisz‘meéry . UN'rENABLE : DEFENDED :: ' (A) satiated : satisfied (B) heretical : considered - ' (C)"Frag'le:touched _ (D) inevitable : avoided (E)~ suspiciouszdoubted - ‘ Hi: :51:- oo—ONTonENEirrPAGfi. Una (5) (10) (15) (20) (25) (30) (35) (4a) '45) Direction: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose- the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is that passage. The more that is discovered about the intricate organization of the nervoussystem, the more it seems remarkable that genes an successfully specify the devel- opment of that system. Human genes contain too little information even to specify which hemisphere of the brain each of a human’s 10” neurons should occupy, let alone the hundreds of connections that each neuron makes. For such reasons, we can assume that there must be an important random factor in neural development, and in particular, that errors must and do occur in the development of all normal brains. The most vivid expression of such errors occurs in genetically identical (isogenic) organisms. Even when reared under the same conditions, isogenic organisms are rarely exact copies of one another, and their differences have revealed much about the random variations that result from an organism's limited supply of genetic infor- mation. In isogenic Daphniae, for example, even though the position, size, and branching pattern of each optic neuron are remarkably constant, there is some vari- ability in conneetivity, and the number of synapses varies greatly. This variability is probably the result of random scatter beyond the resolution of genetic control and is best termed “imprecision,” n’nce its converse, the degree of clustering about a mean, is conventionally called "precision." . Impredsion should be from develop- mental mistakes: wrongly migrated neurons, incorrect connections, and the like. To use a computer analogy, minor rounding-off errors occur universally and are analogous to imprecision, but occasionally a binary digit is incorrectly transmittal, perhaps ruining a mlculation, and this incorrect transmission is analogous to a devel- opmental mistake. Thus, imprecision is‘a form of inaccu- racy inherent within the limits of design, but mistakes are forms of gross fallibility. Both imprecision and gross fallibility can plausibly be blamed on the insufficiency of genetic information, since either could be reduced by adding more information. It is universally accepted among information theorists that codes and languages can be made mistake-resistant by incorporating redundancy. However, since the amount of spam available in any information system is limited, increased redundancy results in decreased precision. For example, rt when written incorrectly in English, “three point (En four two," can be understood correctly even (50) (55) 474 stated or implied in though a typographical error has occurred. More preci- sion could be gained, however, if those 24 spaces were filled with Arabic nlnnerals; then 1: could be expressed to 23 significant digits, although any error would signif- cantly change the meaning. There exists a trade-off; the more preciser a system is spedfied, using a given limitai amount of information, the greater the danger of gross mistakes. The Overall scheme by which genetic informa- tion is rationed out in organisms, therefore, must involve a compromise between two conflictingpriorn'es: precision and the avoidance. of gross mistakes. " 17. Which of the following best expresses the main idea of the passage? (A) Although studies of isogenic organisms have shown that all organisms are subject to devel- opmental variations, there is still scientific debate om the exact causes of these varia~ tions. (B) Because of limitations on_ the amount of infor- ' mation contained in the genes of organisms, developing nervous systems are subject to two basic kinds of error, the likelihood of one of which is reduced only when the likelihood of the other is increased. (C) The complexity of an organi’s genetic'infor- mation means that much of the unusual vari- ation that occurs among organisms can best be explained as the result of developmental mistakes. (D) New findings about the nature of the genetic control of neural development support the 'work of some scientists who argue that the computer is an extremely useful model for understanding the nervous system. ~ (E)_ The major discovery made by scientists studying the genetic control of neural devel- opment is that both impredsion and gross developmental error can be traced to specific types of mutations in specific genes. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 18. According to the passage, one of the reasons it has been assumed that there is an important random element in human neural development is that (A) gens cannot spedfy certain types of develop- mental processes as well as they can others (B) the intricacy of the nervous system allows small developmental errors to occur without harmful effects 1 (C) the amount of information contained in the' gens is less than the amount necessary to specify the location of the neurons (D) the number of neurons in the human brain varis greatly from individual to individual (E) it is theoretically impossible for an organism to protect itself completely from gross develop- mental mistaks 19. The author suggests which of the following about the findings of information theorists? (A) Their findings provocatively challenge the stan- dard explanation of redundancyin gens. (B) Their findings provide useful insights into understanding the rationing of genetic infor- mation. (C) Their findings help to explain why imprecision can occur in neural development but not why gross mistaks can occur. (D) Their findings suggst that gens may be able to specify neural development more accurately than had previously been thought. (E) Their findings support the work of those who ' ' use computer operations as models for understanding genetic control. According to the passage, of the following aspects of the optic neurons of isogenic Daphniae, which van's the most? (A) Size (B) Connectivity (C) Position (D) Branching pattern (E) Number of synapses 20. 21. 475 Which of the following best describes the organim- tion of the first paragraph? (A) A specific case is presented, its details are analyzed, and a conclusion is drawn from it. (B) A discovery is announced, its most significant application is discussed, and possibilities for the future are suggested. (C) A generalization is made, specific situations in which it is applicable are noted, and prob- lems with it are suggested. (D) An observation is made, specifics are provided to support it, and a generalization is derived. (E) A hypothsis is presented, its implications are clarified, and applications of it are discussed. The author ussall of the following to clarify the distinction between imprecision and gross mistake in neural development (A) classification ofwborderline phenomena (B) a description of the relationship between the phenomena denoted by sch term (C) specific exampls of the phenomena denoted by ad: term . (D) an explanation of at least one of the key terms involved - ' (E) - analogis to other types of phenomena . Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the genetic infon-nation of Daphniae? I. Then: is probably some degree of redundancy in the information controlling neural development II. Most of the information for neural development storedinthegensisusedtospecifytheposi- tion: of the optic neurons. ' 111. Then: is sufficient information to preclude the ‘occunence ofgross mistakes during neural~ devdopment. (A) 10111! (B) Honly (C) monb' (D) IandIIonly (E) Handmonly GO ON TO THE NEXTPAGE. (5) (w) (15) (202’ In a recent study, David Cressy examines two central questions concerning English immigration to New England in the 1630's: what kinds of people immigrated and why? Using contemporary literary evidence, ship- ping lists, and customs records, Cressy finds that most adult immigrants were slo'lled in farming or crafts, were literate, and were organized in families. Each of these characteristics sharply distinguishes the 21,000 people who left for New England in the 16305 from most of the approximately 377,000 English people who had immi- grated to America by 1700. With respect to their reasons for immigrating, Cressy does not deny the frequently noted fact that some of the immigrants of the 1630’s, most notably the organizers and clergy, advanced religious explanations for depar- ture, but he finds that such explanations usually assumed primacy only in retrospect. When he moves beyond the principal actors, he finds that religious expla- nations were less frequently ofl'ered and he concludes that most people immigrated because they were recruited by promises of material improvement. 24. In the passage, the author is primarily concerned with (A) summarizing the findings of an investigation (B) analyzing a method of argument (C) evaluating a point of view (D) hypothesizing about a set of circumstances (E) eStablishing categories According to the passage, Cressy would agree with which of the following statements about the orga- niZers among the English immigrants to New England in the l630’s'2. I. Most of them were clergy. II. Some of them offered a religious explanation for their immigration. III. They did not offer any reasons for their . immigration until some time after they had immigrated. IV. They were more likely than the average immigrant to be motivated by material considerations. (A) I only (13) [I only (C) II and III only (D) I, III, and IV only (E) II, III, and IV only 25. 476 26. According to the passage, Cressy has made which of the following claims about what motivated English immigrants to go to New England in the 1630's? (A)~ They were motivated by religious considerations alone. (B) They were motivated by economic considerations alone. . (C) They were motivated by religious and econoan considerations equally. (D) They were motivated more often by economic than by religious considerations. (E) They were motivated more often by religious than by economic considerations. The passage suggests that the majority of those English people who had immigrated to America by the late seventeenth century were 27. (A) clergy (B) young children (C) organizod in families (D) skilled in crafts (E) illiterate GO ON TO THEM PAGE. Directions: Each question .belOw consists of a word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. 30. 31. ' (A) consume 32. CONTINUI'IY: (A) disjunction (B) disability (C) discomfort (D) deceit (E) defection . LETHARGY: (A) flexibility (B) adequacy (C) toughness (D) plainness (E) vigor STOMACH; (A) reformulate (B) anticipate (C) hand out freely (D) refuse to tolerate (E) lose fascination for DEFAULT: @)rmmn (C) rely on others (D) desire to advance (E) fulfill an obligation HAVEN: (A) challenging puzle (B) gloomy cavern (C) dangerous place (D) deserted building (E) unhappy incident l 7 mt, 34. 35. 36. .OCCLUDEDF (A) unobstructed (B) intersecting (C) extrapolated . (D) diminished (E) extended PLUMB: - (A) examine superficially (B) answer accurately (C) agree (D) fool (E) abstain OBSTINATE: (A) excitable (B) tractable (C) dispensable (D) gleanable (E) comfortable . PITH: ‘ (A) unsound opinion (B) previous statement (C) erroneous judgment (D) insignificant part _ (E) inconclusive evidence 37. 38. 477 IMPECUNIOUS: (A) heinous (B) noxious _ (C). contented (D) affluent (E) responsive CANONICAL: (A) infelicitous (B) irrefutable (C) heterodox (D) minuscule (E) undesignated SECTION 6 Time— 30 minutes Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, 38 Questions 5. each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the’word or set of words for each blank that E fits the matting of the sentence as a whole. 1. Only by ignoring decades of mismanagement and inefficiency could investors conclude that a fresh infusion of cash would provide anything more than a solution to the company‘s financial woes. (A) fair (B) temporary (C) genuine (D) realistic (E) complete . Although the discovery of antibiotics led to great advances in clinial practice, it did not represent a -— bacterial illness, for there are some bacteria that cannot be treated with antibiotics. (A) breakthrough in. .consistently (B) panacea for. .effectively (C) neglect of. .efficiently (D) reexamination of . .conventionally (E) resurgence of . .entirely A misconception frequently held by novice writers is that sentence structure mirrors thought: the more convoluted the structure, the more —‘ the ideas. (A) complicated (B) inconsequential (C) elementary (D) fanciful (E) blatant Jones was-unable to recognize the contradictions in his attitudes that were obvious to everyone else; even the hint of an untruth was to him, but he taxes. (A) acceptable. .risked (B) exciting. .averted (C) repugnant. .courted (D) anathema. .evaded (E) tempting. .hamrded serious trouble by always cheating on his 491 Even though the general’s carefully qualified public statement could hardly'be —, some people took It. (A) respected. .liberties with (B) inoffensive. .umbrage at (C) faulted. .atoeption to (D) credited. .potshots at (E) dismissed. .interest in . Though feminist in its implications, Yvonne Rainer’s 1974 film the filnunaker’s active involvement in feminist politics. (A) preserVed (B) portrayed (C) encouraged (D) renewed (E) antedated The chances that a specits will are reduced if any vital function is resn'iCted to a single kind of organ; by itself posesses an enormous survival advantage. (A) degenerate. .complexity (B) expire. .size (C) disappear. .variety (D) flourish. .symmetry (E) persist. .redundancy GO ONTO THE NEXT PAGE. ’ l3. INFILI'RATEzENTERx ‘ (A) complyzindex (B) invadezassault (C) allege:prove Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the orig'nal pair. 8. PLEASURE : ECSTASY :: (A) complacence:envy (B) surprisczastonishment (C) anxietyzcuriosity (D) pride: vexation (E) pityrdread . LIMERICK : POEM :: (A) lampoon:satire (B) settingzplay (C) fablezmoral (D) material : collage (E) plotzeharacter 14. 15. (D) insinuate : say i (E) ' disclose : announce OVERTURE:OPERA:: (A) preamblezstatute (B) gambitsmove (C) climaxzstory (D) actorzmst (E) commencementzgmduate PUNGENT: ODOR :: (A) eausficzcomment (B) dumble:substance (C) constantzpen'od (D) ominous:th (E) excessivezresponsibiliry 10. SOUNDzAIR :: (A) oilztanker‘ 16. ATTACK:VANQUISHED:: (B) signal: wave (A) woo:adored (C) electricityzcopper (B) smother2choked (D) lightzcamera (C) spyzinvestigated (E) x-raytlead (D) goad:provoked . (E) guess:ealculated ll. INDELIBILITY:ERASURE:: (A) impermeability2passage (B) enumeration:ordering (C) lllegibility2writing (D) reactiveness:stimulation (E) reflectivity : Visibility ON TOTHENEXTPAGE. 12.. EXPIATE : GUILT :1 (A) canvass : support (B) adomzappearance (C) testify : conviction (D) correct : error (E) preachchnversion 492 Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its contents After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. [This passage was excerpted from an article published in 17. Which of the following titles best summarizes the 1975,} content of the passage? (A) Haw Theories of Literary Criticism Can Is the literary critic like the poet, responding creatively, Best Be Used ~ intuitively, subjectively to the written word as the poet (B) , Problems Confronting Women Who/Are responds to human experience? Or is the critic more like Feminist Literary Critics a scientist following a series of demonstrable, verifiable (C) A Historical Overview of Feminist Literary steps, using an objective method of analysis? 7 Criticism For the woman who is a practitioner of feminist literary (D) A New Theory of Literary Criticism criticism, the subjectivity versus objectivity, or critic4as- (E) Literary Criticism: Art or Science? artist-or-scientist, debate has special significance; for her, the question is not only academic, but political as well, . ~ . . and her definition will court special risks whichever side 18' 313.21}: lefcmlfgoigfigr MEWS whey“; of the issue it favors. If she defines feminist criticism as 3 an: m macs" objective and scientific—a valid, verifiable, intellectual I. They can make a unique contribution to method that anyone, whether man or woman, can perform sodety. _ —the definition not only precludes the critic-as‘artist 11- Thc)’ I'm-IS! develop a new theory of the critical approach, but may also impede accomplishment of the process. , utilitarian political objectives of those whovseek to III. criticisms of literature should be entirely change the academic establishment and its thinking, Objective. . especially about sex roles. If she defines feminist criticism (A) I only - as creative and intuitive, privileged as art, then her work (3) 11 cm), becomes vulnerable to the prejudices of stereotypic ideas (C) I and In only about the ways in which women think, and will be (D) H and In only dismissed by much of the academic establishment. Because (E) 1' H, and In of these prejudices, women who use an intuitive approach in their criticism may find themselves charged with inability to be analytical, to be objective, or to 19- Ther-hol' spatially-mentions 3-“ 0f thC fOUOWiflg think critically. Whereas men may be free to claim the as menu‘s, Phat Pam” m“: Wm Who role of critic-as-artist, women run different professional 31': theorcfluans 0f fmnm 1ier aim risks when they _choose intuition and private experience EXCEPT “'5 . as critical method and defense- . (A) tendency of a predominantly male/academic These questions are political in the sense that the - csmblishmcnt to form Wampum; debate over them will inevitably be less an exploration about women of abstract matters in a spirit of disinterested inquiry ' (B) [minions that are imposed when mfiM' than an academic power struggle in which the careers is dcfined as objective and sdgmific and PFOfCSSlODal fC’l’lIl-lflfi-s 01' many Women‘SChda-fi— , (C) likelfliood that the work of a woman theoretician only now entering the academic profion in substantial who m the privilege 0113“ will be Viewed numbers—will be at stake, and with them the chances ' with prejudim by some mg; for a distinctive contribution to humanistic understanding, (D) inescaqu of power strugng between a contribution that might be an important influence women in the We prof-mu and against sexim in our soeiety. r the academic establishment As long as the academic establishment. continues to (E) mam of mm of the W mum)- regard objective analysis as “masculine” and an intuitive mam to treat all forms of feminist Em approach as "feminine," the theoretician must steer a theory with hostility r delicate philosophical course between the two. If she wishes to construct a theory of feminist critici, she would be well advised to place it within the framework of a general theory of the critical proces that'is neither purely objective not purely intuitive. Her theory is then . A more likely to be compared and contrasted with other m theories of criticism with some degree of dispassionate GO ON To THE PAGE- distance. - 493 I.‘ 20. According to the author, the debate mentioned in the passage has special signifitamee for the woman who is a theoreficiana of feminist literary criticism for which of the following reasons? (A) There are large numbers of capable women- working within the academic establishment. (B) There are a few powerful feminist critics who have been recognized by the academic establishment. (C) Like other critics, most women who are literary critics define criticism as either scientific or artistic. (D) Women who are literary critics face professional ' tislrsdifferent from those faced by men who are literary critics. (E) Women who are literary critics are more likely to participate in the debate than are men who are literary crictics. ' 21. Which of the following is presented by the author in support of the suggestion that there is stereo- typic thinking among members of the academic establishment? ' (A) A distinctively feminist contribution to humanistic understanding could work against the influence of sexism among members of the academic establishment (B) Women who define criticism as artistic may be seen by the academic establishment as being incapable of critical thinking. (C) The debate over the role of the literary critic t is often seen as a political one. (D) Women scholars are only now entering academia in substantial numbers. (E) The woman who is a critic is forced to construct a theory of literary criticism. 494 22. Which of the following is most likely to be one of the “utilitarian political objectives” mentioned by the author in line 16 ? (A) To forge a new theory of literary criticism (B) To pursue truth in a disinterested manner (C) To demonstrate that women are interested in ‘ literary criticism that can be vieWed either subjectively or objectively (D) To convince the academic establishment to revise the ways in which it assesses women scholars' professional qualities (E) To dissuade women who are literary critics from taking a subjective approach to literary criticism . It can be inferred that the author would define “political” (line 30) questions that a . — «- (A) are contested largely through contentions over power (B) are primarily academic in nature and open to abstract analysis (C) are not in themselves important (D) cannot be resolved without extensive debate (E) will be debated by both‘men and women GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. I”! (5) (10) {15) {20) [This passage was excerpted from an article published in 1979.] Quantum mechanics is a highly successful theory: it supplies methods for accurately calculating the results of diverse experiments, especially with minute particles. The predictions of quantum mechanics, however, give only the probability of an event, not a deterministic statement of whether or not the event will occur. Because of this probabilism, Einstein remained strongly dissatisfied with the theory throughout his life, though he did not maintain that quantum mechanics is wrong. Rather, he held that it is incomplete: in quantum mechanics the motion of a particle must be described in terms of probabilities, he argued, only because some parameters that determine the motion have not been specified. If these hypothetical “hidden parameters” were known, a fully deterministic trajectory could be defined. Significantly, this hidden-parameter quantum theory leads to experimental predictions different from those of traditional quantum mechanics...Einstein‘s ideas have been tested by experiments performed since his death, and as most of these experiments support tradi- tional quantum mechanics, Einstein's approach is almost certainly erroneous. 24. The author regards the idea that agaiqu quantum mechanics is incomplete with (A) approval (B) surprise (C) indifference (D) apprehension (E) skepticism It can be inferred from the passage that the author's conclusion that Einstein's approach is “erroneous” (line 22) might have to be modified because (A) it is theoretically possible to genaate plausible ' theories with hidden parameters within them ' (B) some experimental tats of Einstein’s theory do not disconfirrn the hidden-parameter theory of quantum mechanics (C) it is possible for a theory to have hidden parameters and yet be probabilistic (D) traditional quantum mechanics has not yet been used to analyze all of the phenomena to which it could be applied (E) there are too many possible hidden parameters to develop meaningful tests of hidden- ' parameter theories 25. 495 27. 26. According to the passage, Einstein posed‘ objxtions to the ‘ (A) existence of hidden parameters in quantum theory , (B) probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics (C) idea that quantum mechanics is incomplete (D) results of experiments testing quantum theory (E) importance accorded quantum mechanics in physit: The passage suggests that which of the following would have resulted if the experiments mentioned in lines 18-20 had n_o_t_'supported the predictions of traditional quantum mechanics? (A) Einstein, had he been alive, would have revised his approach to quantum mechanics. (B) Hidden-parameter theories would have been considered inaccurate descriptions of real- world phenomena. (C) A deterministic description of the motion of a particle might still be considered possible. (D) Quantum mechanics would have ceased to attract the attention of physicists. (E) Einstein, had he been alive, would have aban- doned attempts to specify the hidden parame- ters that describe motion. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is , most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28.1NGEST: ' (A) throw around (B) take along (C) expel (D) uncover (E) enlarge SCRUTINY: * ‘ r (A) awkwardness (B) misunderstanding (C) casual glance (D) simple movement (E) slight injury ' _ 29. 30. SLEW: (A) uncertain supply (B) unwanted interference (C) unsuitable arrangement (D) poor beginning (E) limited quantity 3]. NEGATION: (A) allegiance (B) affirmation (C) guarantee (D) acquittal (E) validity SATE: (A) dehydrate (B) enervate (C) initiate (D) quaff (E) starve 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. ' 38. 496 DISPOSED: (A) disinclined (B) disrupted (C) determined (D) derided (E) depressed JIBE: . (A) surpass (B) prevent (C) qualify (D) conflict (E) collect APPRECIABLE: (A) interminable , (B) unsafisfactory (C) tentative (D) timid (E) imperceptible ARTLESSNESS: (A) zest (B) sense (C) mania (D) quirkiness (E) guile FATUITY: (A) desiccation (B) sagacity ,. (C) veracity (D) confirmation (E) artifice PROPITIATE: (A) antagonize (B) discourage (C) repress (D) forsake (E) deceive FOR GENERAL TEST 12 ONLY Answer' Key and Percentages' of Examinees Answering Each Ouesiion‘Con’ectIy‘ QUANTITATIVE AIIUTY W1 Sodlml4 mm mm 1+ c 1 a A 1 A a D o 2 a D 2 a E 3 D 3 A a 3 D E c A 4 c a 4 a D c a 5 c c 5 a A a D s E A a c c E E 7 E A 7 A c 3 D a a D a A A D B 9 A A 9 D A A B 10 c A 10 c o E C 11 A B 49 11 B 56 D D c 12 o c 36 12 B 53 A c E 13 o B 35 13 B 45 a c a 14 A c 52 14 c 38 a A A 15 A o 24 15 c 47 o A o 16 o c 33 15 a 57 E D a 17 a E 31 17 c 73 a E c 13 A A 63 13 D 77 A A a 19 E s 75 19 a 79 o c E 20 o D 39 20 E 61 A E D 21 a c as 21 D 53 E D A 22 D a as 22 E 37 E A A 23 A a 62 23 A 34 c o A 24 E c 52 24 D 73 E c a 25 a E 40 25 a 40 a o D 25 a 56 E 75 25 c 48 E 27 c 41 A 45 27 a 37 A 23 c 93 a 54 25 A 29 E 29 c 87 A 35 29 A 25 D 30 E 84 E 26 30 E 19 E 31 a 79 c 32 E 45 A 33 A 45 A 34 o 33 B 35 E 41 D 36 E 34 D 37 a 29 c 38 A 17 ‘Esu‘rnatod P+ fur the gmup of examinees who took m- GRE Gonaal Test in a mean! mrae-yaar period. 497 ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/02/2010 for the course SADAS saas taught by Professor Asa during the Spring '09 term at Punjab Engineering College.

Page1 / 13

Bigbook_12 - SECTION 3 Time—3O minutes . ' ——"'...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online