Bigbook_13 - TEST 13 SECTION I Time—30 minutes ‘ ‘ 38...

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Unformatted text preview: TEST 13 SECTION I Time—30 minutes ‘ ‘ 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence that fol10ws has one or two blanks. each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Following the sentence are five lettered words or sets ofwords. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that b_eS_t fits the meaning ofthe sentence as a whole. 1. The availability of oxygen is an essential ---- -- for animal life, while carbon dioxide is equally --‘-- for plant life. ‘ (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) choice. .optional duplication. selective conversion. .exchangeable condition. .neCessary luxury. .harmful 2. Prudery actually draws attention to the vice it is ) supposed to ; the very act that forbids speech or prohibits sight - what is hidden. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) condemn. .distorts monitor. .signals repress. .dramatizes obviate. .fosters divulge. .conceals 3. After thirty years of television, people have become “speed watchers"; consequently, if the camera lingers. the interest of the audience . (A) broadens (B) begins (C) varies (D) flags (E) clears Compared mathematically to making and driving, almost everything else seems reiatively risk-free, ---- almost nothing seems worth regulating. (A) yet (B) since (C) so (D) even though (E) aslongas 5. Ironically, Carver’s precision in sketching lives on 499 the edge of despair ensures that his stories will some times be read too narrowly, much as Dickens’ social-reformer role once caused his' broader concerns to be ——. (A) ignored (B) reinforced (D) diminished (C) contradicted (E) diversified The demise of the rigorous academic curriculum in . high school resulted, in part, from the progressive rhetoric that the study of subjects previously thought -—-- as part of school learning. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) advocated. necessary enhanced. indispensable restricted. .impractical undermined. .popular sanctioned. .inappropriate . While some see in practical jokes a wish for mastery in miniature over a world that seems very -—-, others believe that the jokes’ purpose is to disrupt. by reducing all transactions to (A) dubious. .confusion -. (B) disorderly. .symmetry (C) harmonious. .dissonanoe (D) unruly. .chaos (E) turbulent. uniformity GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the folloiving questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by_five lettered pairs A of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. ATHLETEzTROPHY :: (A) detectiv’etbadgek 10. ll. 12. n: (B) presenterzaward ((C) soldierrmedal (D) bettor:stake (E) musiciauzinstrument . ARTICULATE L UNCLEAR :: (A) assign2unencumbered (B) elaboratezsketchy (C) explainzlucid (D) grievezsomber (E) march:planned INVENTORY : STOCK :: (A) calculation gledger (B) poll : balloting (C) surveyzten'itory (D) censusrpopulation' (E) petition : names LOGIC : REASONING :: (A) sensitivityzmorality (B) arrogancezleadership (C) ethics: behavior (Dr’creativity : enthusiasm (E) bravery-:charisma MIMICRY 2 CAMOUFLAGE :: (A) photosynthesis : pollination (B) territorialityzmigration (C) hibemation2generation (D) mutation: variation (E) digestion: rumination 500 13. APPREHENSION : TERROR :: (A) interest:conspiracy ' (B) affection.:adoration (C) indifferenoezanimosity (D) reluctance: termination l (E) anxietyzfaith l4. LUMBER1GRACE :: (A) dissemble:pretense (B) relent:energy (C) castigate: justice (D) waverzrcsolution (E) insinuatezsubtlety CAUSTIC : EAT AWAY 2: (A) hormone2inhibit (B) reagentzbind (C) explosive:destroy (D) syntheticzsubstitute * (E) desiccant:dry 15. 16. MALINGERER:DUTY:: (A) scholarzpedantry (B) recluse2hmnamty (C) rebel : responsibility (D) miser:wéalth (E) patron : criticism GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. i \ Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. Classical physics defines the vacuum as a state of absence: a vacuum is said to exist in a region of space if there is nothing in it. In the quantum field theories that describe the physics of elementary particles, the vacuum becomes somewhat more complicated. Even in empty space, particles can appear spontaneously as a result of fluctuations of the vacuum. For example, an electron and a positron, or antielectron. can be created out of the void. Particles created in this way have only a fleeting existence; they are annihilated almost as soon as they appear, and their presence can never be detected directly. They are called virtual particles in order to distinguish them from real particles. whose lifetimes are not con- strained in the same way, and which can be detected. Thus it is still possible to define the vacuum as a space that has no real particles in it. One might expect that the vacuum would always be the state of lowest possible energy for a given region of space. If an area is initially empty and a real particle is put into it, the total energy. it seems, should be raised by at least the energy equivalent of the mass of the added particle. A surprising result of some recent theoretical investigations is that this assumption is not invariably true. There are conditions under which the introduction ofa real particle of finite mass into an empty region of space can reduce the total energy. If the reduction in energy is great enough. an electron and a positron will be spontaneously created. Under these conditions the electron and positron are not a result of vacuum fluctua- tions but are real particles, which exist indefinitely and can be detected. In other words, under these conditions the vacuum is an unstable state and can demy into a state of 10wer energy; i.e., one in which real particles are created. The essential condition for the decay of the vacuum is the presenCe of an intense electric field. As a result of the decay of the vacuum, the space permeated by such a field can be said to acquire an electric charge, and it can be called a charged Vacuum. The particles that materi- alize in the space make the charge manifest. An electric field of sufficient intensity to create a charged vacuum is likely to be found in only one place: in the immediate vicinity of a superheavy atomic nucleus, one with about twice as many protons as the heaviest natural nuclei known. A nucleus that large cannot be stable, but it might be possible to assemble one next to a vacuum for long enough to observe the decay of the vacuum. Experi— ments attempting to achieve this are now under way. 501 l7. l8. l9. Which of the following titles best describes the passage as a whole? (A) TheVacuum: Its Fluctuations and Decay , (B) The Vacuum: Its Creation and Instability (C) The Vacuum: A State of Absence (D) Particles That Materialize in the Vacuum (E) Classical Physics and the Vacuum According to the passage, the assumption that the introduction of a real particle into a vacuum raises the total energy of that region of space has been cast into doubt by which of the following? (A) Findings from’laboratory experiments (B) Findings from observational field experimean (C) Accidental observations made during other experiments (D) Discovery of several erroneous propositions in accepted theories ~ (E) Predictions based on theoretical work It can be inferred from the passage that scientists are currently making efforts to observe which of the following events? (A) The decay ofa vacuum in the presence of virtual particles - ' - - (B) The decay of a vacuum next to-a superheavy atomic'nucleus ' ; (C) The creation of a superheavy atomic nucleus next to an intense electric field ' (D) The creation of a virtual electron and a virtual positron as a result of fluctuations of a vacuum . (E) The creation of a charged vacuum in which only real electrons can be created in the vacuum’s region of space GO ON To THE NEXT PAGE. 20. ll. Physicists’ recent investigations of the decay of the vacuum, as described in the passage; most closely resemble which of the following hypothetical events in other disciplines? (A) On the basis of data gathered in a carefully controlled laboratory experiment, a chemist ' predicts and then demonstrates the physical properties of a newly synthesized polymer. (B) On the basis of manipulations of macroeco- nomic theory, an economist predicts that, contrary to accepted economic theory, infla- tion and unemployment will both decline . under conditions of rapid economic growth. (C) On the basis of a rereading of the texts of Jane ‘ Austen‘s novels, a literary critic suggests that, contrary to accepted literary interpretations. Austen’s plots were actually metaphors for political events in early nineteenth-century England. ' ' ’ ‘ (D) On the basis of data gathered in carefully planned observations of several species of birds, a biologist proposes a modification in the accepted theory of interspecies competi- tion. (E) On the basis of a study of observations inciden- tally recorded in ethnographers.‘ descriptions of non—Westem societies, an anthropologist proposes a new theory of kinship relations. According to the passage, the author considers the reduction of energy in an empty region of space to which a real particle has been added to be (A) a well-known process (B) a frequent occurrence (C) a fleeting aben‘ation (D) an unimportant event (E) an unexpected outcome 502 _ 22. According to the passage, virtual particles differ 23. from real particles in which of the following ways? I. Virtual particles have extremely short lifetimes. 11. Virtual particles are created in an intense elec- tric field. V III. Virtual particles cannot be detected directly”; (A) lonly (B) H only (C) 111 only (D) I and II only (E) I and I'll only The author’s assertions concerning the conditions that lead to the dctny of the vacuum would be most weakened if which of the following occurred? (A) Scientists created an electric field next to a . ‘ vacuum, but found that the electric field was not intense enough to create a charged vacuum. (B) Scientists assembled a superheavy atomic nucleus next to a vacuum, but found that no virtual particles were created in the vacuum’s region of space. ’ ’ 4 (C) Scientists assembled a superheavy atomic ‘nucleus next to a vacuum. but found that they could not then detect any real particles in the vacuum's region of space. (D) Scientists introduced a virtual electron and a _ virtual positron into a vacuum’s region of space. but found that the vacuum did not then fluctuate. ‘ . (E) Scientists introduced a real electron and a real positron into a vacuum’s region of space, but found that the total energy of the space increased by the energy equivalent of the mass of the particles. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. L Simone de Beauvoir’s work greatly influenced Betty Friedan’s-indeed, made it possible. Why, then, was it Friedan who became the prophet of women’s emancipa- tion in the United States? Political conditions, as well as a certain anti-intellectual bias, prepared Americans and the American media to better receive Friedan’s deradi- calized and highly pragmatic The Feminine Mystique, published in 1963, than Beauvoir’s theoretical reading of women‘s situation in The Second Sex. In 1953 when The Second Sex first appeared in translation in the United States, the country had entered the silent, fearful fortress of the anticommunist McCarthy years (1950-1954), and Beauvoir was suspected of Marxist sympathies. Even The Nation, a generally liberal magazine, warned its readers against “certain political leanings" of the author. Open acknowledgement of the existence of women’s oppression was too radical for the United States in the fifties, and Beauvoir’s conclusion, that change in women’s economic condition, though insufficient by itself, “remains the basic factor” in improving women’s situation, was particularly unacceptable. 24. According to the passage, one difference between The Feminine Mystique and The Second Sex is that Friedan's book (A) rejects the idea that women are oppressed (B) provides a primarily theoretical analysis of ‘ women’s lives (C) does not reflect the political beliefs of its author (D) suggests that women‘s economic condition has no impact on their status (E) concentrates on the practical aspects of the question of women’s emancipation 25. The author quotes from The Nation most probably in order to (A) modify an earlier assertion (B) point out a possible exception to her argument (C) illustrate her central point (D) clarify the meaning of a term (E) cite an expert opinion 503 26. It can be inferred from the passage that which of the following is not a factor in the explanation of why The Feminine Mystique was received more positively in the United States than was The Second sex? (A) By 1963 political conditions in the United States had changed. (B) Friedan’s book was less intellectual and ' abstract than Beauvoir’s. (C) Readers did not recognize the powerful influ- ence of Beauvoir's book on Friedan’s ideas. (D) Friedan’s approach to the issue of women‘s emancipation was less radical than Beau- voir’s. (E) American readers were more willing to consider the problem of the oppression of women in the sixties than they had been in the fifties. 27. According to the passage, Beauvoir's book asserted that the status of women (A) is the outcome of political oppression (B) is inherently tied to their economic condition (C) can be best improved under a communist government . (D) is a theoretical, rather than a pragmatic, issue (E) is a critical area of discussion in Marxist economic theory , GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. ‘ Each question below consists of a word I cpitnl letters, followed by five lettered words (loose the lettered word or phrase that is —iy in meaning to the word in capital . of the questions require you to distinguish “a of meaning, be sure to consider all the ' More deciding which one is best. - .. STERLUZE: (A) uncover (B) imitate t a contaminate (D) operate (E) agitate I INADVER‘IENT: _(A) well known '- (I) quitesimilar (C) fortunate (D) normal (E) intentional I. SUBLIMINAL: (A) adroit (B) gentle C) dovmmst (E) at a perceptible level II. HACATE: (A) avert C) procure (D) subside (E) revolt n INUN'DATE: (A) drain (B) erupt (D) decelerate (E) disturb n ROURISH: (A) lack of consistency (B) lack of embellishment (C) lack of sense (D) lack of spontaneity (E) lack of substance (D) able to be manipulated (B) antagonize (C) exit 504 35. 36. 37. 38. . SUMMARILY; (A) afier long deliberation (B) with benevolent intent (C) in general disagreement (D) under close scrutiny - (E) from questionable premises STOLID: (A) excitable (B) friendly (C) slender (D) brittle (E) weak IDY'LL: (A) negative appraisal (B) pedestrian argument (C) object created for a purpose (D) experience fraught with tension (E)- action motivated by grad ASPERITY: . (A) failure of imagination (B) brevity of speech (C) sureness of judgment '(D) mildness of temper (E) lack of beauty DESULTORY: (A) highly (B) cheerfully accepted (C) 53011le highlighted (D) lightly considered (E) strictly methodical . 11+: SECTION 4 . Time—30 minutes 3 8 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that bit fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. Aspartame, a new artificial sugar substitute, is only ——- replacement for saccharin because, unlike saccharin, it breaks down and loses its' sweetening characteristics at high temperatures, making it --— for baking. - (A) an interim. .ideal (B) an apparent. .excellent (C) a potential. .versatile (D) a significant. .problematic (E) a partial. .unsuitable 2. Trapped thousands of years ago in Antarctic ice, recently discovered air bubbles are ---——- time capsules filled with information for scientists who chan'the history of the atmosphere. (B) broken (E) impenetrable (A) inconsequential (D) resplendent (C) veritable 3. In the days before the mass marketing of books, censorship was source of —-—. which helped the sale of the book and inspired Ralph Waldo Emerson to remark: “Every burned book enlightens the world." ' (A) a respected. .opinion (B) a constant. .guidance (C) a prime. .publicity (D) an unnoticed. .opposition (E) an unpromising. .criticism 516 4. .It was not only the , of geologists that . earlier development of the revolutionaryidea that _ the Earth’s continents 'were moving plates; classical physicists, who could not then explain the mecha-f nism, had declared continental mavement irnpos— sible. ' ‘ (A) indecisiveness. .challenged I (B) ‘radicalism.'.deterred (C) conservatism. .hindeted (D) assumptions. .hastened (E) resistance. .mandated . Although often extremely critical of the medical profession as a whole, people are tarer willing to treat their personal doctors with equal ——-«-. (B) sarcasm (C) mockery (E) condescension (A) impetuosity (D) contempt . Aalto. like other modernists, believed that form follows function; consequently,,his furniture designs assened the of human needs, and the furni- ture's form was human use. (A) universality. .refined by (B) importance. .relegated to (C) rationale. .cmphasized by (D) primacy. .determined by (E) variability. .refiected in . A ——— acceptance of contemporary forms of social behavior has misled a few into believing that values in conflict with the present age are for all practical purposes ---—--. ‘ (A) casual. .reliable (B) superficial..trenchant (C) complaCent. superseded (D) cautious.i.redemptive (E) plaintive. .redundant GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the following questions. a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. TEACHER : CERTIFICATION :: (A) driverzlicense (B) officer:handcuffs (C)"librarian:book (D) mechanicztool (E) architect:blueprint 9. FOOD : NOURISH :: (A) organ : secrete (B) fluids : circulate (C) cells : degenerate (D) antibodieszprotect (E) fatszsaturate lO. HACK : CARVE :: (A) grind : polish (B) snip : mince (C) hew : fell (D) whet; blunt (E) gougezengrave ll. DETOXIFY : POISON :: (A) detemtine : certainty (B) destabilizezdeviance (C) disguisezcostume (D) dissolvezliquid (E) dehydratezwater 12. SUPERIMPOSEzABOVE: (A) permeatezbeside" (B) focuszaround (C) insert 2 between (D) splice : below (E) fusezbehind 517 l3. [4. 15. ‘16. i ‘ TAMPER : ADJUST :: (A) misrepresentzcommunicate (B) warp2deform (C) confess : tell (D) mar:deface (E) underminezstop METAPHOR : LITERAL :: (A) biography : accurate (B) melody2spoken (C) poem: rhythmic (D) anthem : patriotic (E) balletzintricate u COURAGE: RASHNESS :: (A) generosityzprodigality (B) temperance:modesty (C) mettlezspin't (D) honorzhumility (E) compassionrcontempt PRBCIENCE ; FUTURE :: (A) irrationality:sanity (B) predictability : past (C) irasdbilityzemotions (D) erudition : esoten'ca: (E) talkativeness : loquacity GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. 19. According to thepassage, members of the Araneidae family can-be distinguished from members of the Uloboridae family by all of the following EXCEPT (A) the presence of venom glands! (B) the type of web they spin (C) the structure of their body hair- (D) the arrangement of their eyes , (E) their appearance _ One of the questions of interest in the study of the evolution of spiders is whether the weaving of orb webs evolved only once or several times. About half the 35,000 known kinds of spiders make webs; a third of the web weavers make orb webs. Since most orb weavers belong either to the Araneidae or the Uloboridae "_ families, the origin of the orb web can be determined only by ascertaining whether the families are related. Recent taxonomic analysis of individuals'from both families indicates that the families evolved from different _ ancestors, thereby contradicting Wiehle's theory. This 20. Which of the following statements, if true, most theory postulates that the families must be related, based weakens Wiehle’s theory that complex behavior on the assumption that complex behavior, such as web could evolve .only once? building, could evolve only once. According to Kullman, (A) Horses, in“,qu [o The Nc'w worm] 5y me web structure is the only characteristic that suggests a . . . . . _ relationship between families. The families differ in unwed under dwcrsc chat“: appearance, structure of body hair, and arrangement . of eyes. Only Uloborids lack venom glands. Further (B) “in? or the Rename far”? dwndanl‘ or identification and study of characteristic features will f 0mg" igcstgrihwfivc umquc undoubtedly answer the question of theevolution of $353; [Trouogfimt ti=1et>“elt::;.lsdoccup3’ similar the 0Tb web. (C) All mammals are descended from a small, rodentlike animal whose physical characteris- tics in some form are found in all its descen- l7. The primary purpose of the passage is to dants. (A) settle the question of whethe: orb webs evolved once or more than once (B) describe scientific speculation concerning an issue related to the evolution of orb webs (C) analyze the differences between the character- istic features of spiders in the Araneidae and Uloboridae families (D) question the methods used by earlier investiga- tors of the habits of spiders (E) demonstrate that Araneidae‘spiders are not related to Uloboridae spiders 18. It can be inferred from the passage that all orb- weaving spiders belong to types of spiders that (A) lack venom glands (B) are included either in the Uloboridae or Araneidae families (C) share few characteristic features with other spider types (D) comprise less than a third of all known types of spiders , (E) are more recently evolved than other types of spiders (D) Plants in the Cactaceae and Euphorbiaceae families, although they often look alike and have developed similar mechanisms to meet the rigors of the desert, evolved indepen- dently. (E) The Cuban anole, which was recently intro— duced in the Florida wilds, is quickly replacing the native Florida chameleon because the anole has no competitors. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. “Popular art" has a number of meanings, impossible to define with any precision. which range from folklore to junk. The poles are clear enough, but the middle tends to blur. The Hollywood Western of the 1930's, for example, has elements of folklore, but is closer to junk than to high art or folk art. There can be great trash, just as there is bad high art. The musicals of George Gershwin are great popular art, never aspiring to high art. Schubert and Brahms, however, used elements of popular music—folk themes—in works clearly intended as high art. The case of Verdi is a different one: he took a popular genrev—bourgeois melodrama set to music (an accuratedefinition of nineteenth-century opera)—and, without altering its fundamental nature, transmuted it into high art. This remains one of the greatest achieve- ments in music, and one that cannot be fully appreciated without recognizing the essential trashiness of the genre. As an example of such a transmutation, consider what Verdi made of the typical political elements of nineteenth-century opera. Generally in the plots of these operas, a hero or heroine—usually portrayed only as an individual, unfettered by class—is caught between the immoral corruption of the aristocracy and the doctri- naire rigidity or secret greed of the leaders of the prole- tariat. Verdi transforms this naive and unlikely fonnula- tion with music of extraordinary energy and rhythmic vitality, music more subtle than it' seems at first hearing. There are scenes and aria that still sound like calls to arms and were clearly understood as such when they were first performed. Such pieces lend an immediacy to the otherwise veiled political message of these'operas and call up feelings beyond those of the opera itself. Or consider Verdi's treatment of character. Before Verdi, there were rarely any characters at all in musin drama, only a series of situations which allowed the singers to express a series of emotional states. Any attempt to find coherent psychological portrayal in these operas is misplaced ingenuity. The only Coherence was the singer’s vocal technique: when the cast changed, new arias were almost always substituted, generally adapted from other operas. Verdi‘s characters, on the other hand, have genuine consistency and integrity, even if, in many cases, the consistency is that of pasteboard melodrama. The integrity of the character is achieved through the music: once he had become established, Verdi did not rewrite his music for different singers or countenance alterations or subsn'tutions of somebody else’s ariasin one of his operas, as every eighteenth-century composer had done. When he revised an opera, it was only for dramatic economy and effectiveness. 519 2]. S s The author refers to Schubert and Brahms in order to suggest (A) that their achievements are no less substantial than those of Verdi (B) that their works are examples of great trash (C). the extent to which Schubert and Brahms influ- enced the later compositions of Verdi (D) a contrast between the conventions of : 9 nineteenth-century opera and those of other musical forms (E) that popular music could be employed in compositions intended as high art . According to the passage, the immediacy of the poiitical' message in Verdi’s operas stems from the (A) vitality and subtlety of the music (B) audience‘s familiarity with earlier operas (C) portrayal of heightened emotional states (D) individual talents of the singers (E) verisimilitude of the characters . According to the passage, all of the following char- acterize musical drama before Verdi EXCEPT (A) aria tailored to a particular singer’s ability (B) adaptation of music from other operas (C) psychological inconsistency in the portrayal of characters V V (D) expression of emotional states in a series of ' dramatic situations (E) ‘rnusic used for the purpose of defining a char- acter ' v GO ON TO NEXT PAGE. .M 24. It can be inferred that the author regards Verdi’s revisions to his operas with (A) regret that the original music and texts were altered - - (B) concern that many of the revisions altered the plots of the original work' (C) approval for the intentions that motivated the ‘ revisions v (D) puzlement. since therrevisions seem largely insignificant V (E) enthusiasm, since the revisions-were aimed at 25. reducing the conventionality of the operas’ 'plots According to the passage, one of Verdi‘s achieve- ments within the framework of nineteenth-century opera and its conventions was to (A) limit the extent to which singers influenced the musical composition and performance of his operas (B) use his operas primarily as forums to protest ' both the moral corruption and dogmatic rigidity of the political leaders of his time (C) portray psychologically complex characters shaped by the political environment surrounding them (D) incorporate elements of folklore into both the music and plots of his operas (E) introduce political elements into an art form that had traditionally avoided political content 520 26. Which of the following best' describes the relation- 27, ship of the first paragraph of the passage to the passage as a whole? - (A) It provides a group of specific examples from which generalizations are drawn later in the Passagc- . (B) It leads to an assertion that is supported by examples later in the passage. 7 (C) It defines terms and relationships that are chal- lenged in an argument later in- the passage. (D) It briefly compares and contrasts several * achievements that are'exarnined in detail later in the passage. ‘ (E) It explains a method of judging a work of art, a method that is used later in the passage. 1 It can be inferred that the author regards the inde- pendence from social class of the heroes and hero. ines of nineteenth-century opera as (A) an idealized but fundamentally accurate . , portrayal of bourgeois life (13) a plot convention with no real connection to I political reality 1 (C) aplot refinement unique to Verdi . (D) a symbolic representation of the position of the bourgeoisie relative to the aristocracy and the proletariat (E) a convention largely seen as irrelevant by audi- ences - z . GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters. followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish t'me shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. PERISH: (A) move on (C) come after (D) transgress (B) survive (E) strive 29. UNPREDICTABLE: (A) sensitive (B) compliant (C) dependable (E) laudable (D) mature (B) torment (E) penalty 30. TRIBUTE: (A) denunciation (C) betrayal (D) menace 3l. FINESSE: (A) indecision (B) heavy-handedness (C) extroversion (D) extravagance (E) competitiveness 34. 35. 36. 38. 521 32. 33. 37. \ SAP: (A) reinstate (B) condone (C) bolster (D) satiate (E) facilitate CONVOLUTED: (A) symmetrical (B) separate (C) straightforward (D) completely flexible (E) consistently calm MITIGATE: (A) exacerbate (B) preponderate (C) accelerate (D) elevate (E) extrapolate TORPQR: (A) rigidity (B) randomness (C) agility (D) obscurity (E) vigor ZENITH: (A) decline (B) anticlimax (C) foundation (D) nadir (E) abyss VENAL: (A) pleasant (B) clever (C) healthy (D) unstinting (E) incorruptible PERIl’ATETIC: (A) stationary (B) enclosed (C) discrete (D) essential (E) careful FORGENERAL TEST 13 ONLY ‘ Answer Key and Percentages’ of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly venm Ammr nummnmve ABILITY ' ANALYUCAL mun ' ' .331!!!— Sectlon 1 Section 4 " ‘ mm— Section 5 x ‘ mm 9+ um» um h mama: - 1 D 97 1 E 91 1 A B2 1 A 87 » 1 B 1 E 2 C 62 2 C 74 2 D 62 2 C 80 2 D 2 A 3 D 63 3 C 30 3 B 80 3 B 90 3 A 3 B 4 C 60 4 C 61 4 B 76 4 D 78 4 D 4 E 5 A 47 5 ' D 55 5 A 74 5 A 77 5 C 5 A 6 E 47 6 D 50 v V S C 72 6 B 78 6 E . 6 C 7 D 45 7 C‘ 41 7 B 76 ‘ 7 C 74 7 E 7 D 8 C 95 8 - A 98 8 A 74 8 A 44 8 B B A 9 B B5 9 D 92 9 B 60 9 A 56 9 _ C 9 C 10 D 76 10 E 54 10 C 48 10 D 4-8 1 0 E 10 D 11 C 71 11 E 79 11' A 63 11 B 45 11 C 11 B 1 2 D 56 12 ‘ C 73 12 A 70 12 C ~ 37 12 B 12 B 1 3 B 65 1 3 A 4 37 1 3 D 39 13- D 33 13 C 13 B 1 4 D 48 14 B 47 14 C 43 1 4 B 38 14 D 14 E 1 5 E 34 15 A 36 15 D 28 15 D 21 15 C 15 C 16 B 18 18 D 29 16 C 86 16 D 90 16 A 16 B 1 7 A 53 17 B 67 17 B 79 17 A 67 17 D 1 7 A 18 E 73 18 D 29 18 C 85 1B 0 76 18 E 18 E 1 9 B 59 1 9 B 79 1 9 B 66 1 9 C 81 19 A' 1 9 D 20 B 51 20 D 65 20 D 63 20 C 65 20 D 20 C 21 E 63 21 E 76 21 A 89 21 A 97 21 E 21 A 22 E 62 22 A 59 22 C 88 22 C 85 22 E 22 A 23 C 37 23 E 55 23 C 70 23 E 57 23 B 23 D 24 E 50 24 C 64 24 E 61 24 B 60 24 D 24 B 25 C 63 25 A 23 25 D 49 25 D 63 25 A 25 C \ 26 C 35 26 B 40 26 D 71 26 D ' 69 ‘ 27 B 69 27 B 29 27 D 48 27 B ‘73 28 C 95 26 B 91 26 E 38 28 B 63 29 E 84 29 C 83 29 B 33 29 E 54 30 E 56 30 A 33 30 A 29 30 A 47 31 B 68 31 B 80 32 A 51 32 C 53 33 B 46 33 C ' 63 34 A 38 34 A 44 35 A 36 35 E 34 36 D 33 36 D 25 37 D 24 37 E 28 38 E 1 3 38 A 25 'Eslimaled P+ for the group 01 examinees who look the GRE General Test in a recent three-year period. ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/02/2010 for the course SADAS saas taught by Professor Asa during the Spring '09 term at Punjab Engineering College.

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Bigbook_13 - TEST 13 SECTION I Time—30 minutes ‘ ‘ 38...

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