Bigbook_17 - TEST 17 SECTION 1 Time —- 30 minutes 38...

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Unformatted text preview: TEST 17 SECTION 1 Time —- 30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two 5. blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that b_es_t fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. Created to serve as perfectly as possible their workaday ---—-, the wooden storage boxes made in America’s Shaker communities are now —-- for their beauty. 6 (A) environment. .accepted (B) owners. .employed (C) function. .valued (D) reality. .transformed -_ (E) image. .seen . In order to ------ her theory that the reactions are -—-«--, the scientist conducted many experiments, all of which showed that the heat of the first reaction is more than twice that of the second. (A) support. .different (B) comprehend. .constant (C) evaluate. .concentrated (D) capture. .valuable (E) demonstrate. .problematic 3. The sheer bulk of data from the mass media seems i to‘ overpower us and drive us to an easily and readily digestible portion of news. (A) insular (C) synoptic (D) subjective (B) investigative (E) sensational accounts for 4. William James lacked the usual -—-- death; writing _ to his dying father, he spoke without the old man‘s impending‘death. (A) longing for. .regret (B) awe of . .inhibition (C) curiosity about. .ranc’or (D) apprehension of. .eloquence (E) anticipation of. .commiseration about 651 Current data suggest that, although .--—— states between fear and aggression exist, fear and aggres- sion are as distinct physiologically as they are psy- chologically. (A) simultaneous (B) serious (C) exceptional (D) partial (E) transitional It is ironic that a critic of such overwhelming vanity now suffers from a measure of the oblivion to which he was forever —~«-- others; in the end, all his --—-—- has only worked against him. (A) dedicating. self-possession (B) leading. self-righteousness (C) consigning. .self-adulation (D) relegating. .self-sacrifice (E) condemning. .self-analysis . Famous among job seekers for its -—, the com- pany, quite apart from generous salaries, bestowed on its executives annual bonuses and such .—- as low-interest home mortgages and company cars. (A) magnanimity. .reparations (B) inventiveness. .benefits (C) largesse. .perquisites (D) discernment. .prerogatives (E) altruism. .credits GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of wordsor phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. 'WEB : SPIDER :: 9. 10. 11. 12. (A) flower : bee (C) nest : bird (B) canal : otter (E) bait:flsh (D) acorn : squirrel F OUR-POSTER 5 BED :: (A) convertible : automobile (B) soldierzarmy (C) studentzschool (D) chlorine: water (E) paper : wood BONE : BODY :: (-A) scaffold : hinge (B) brace : comer (C) strutzbuttress (D) lattice : division (E) girderzskyscraper SCOOP ; CONCAVE :: (A) tongs"; hollow (B) spatula : flat (C) beaterztined (D) cleaver2indented (E) skewererde SYMBOLS 2 REBUS 2: A (A) noteszscore (B) nulitaryzinsig'nia (C) proportionstrecipe '(D) program : computer (E) Silversmith : hallmark 652 13. 14. 15. 16. GUSH : EFFUSIVE :; ‘ (A) exult:honest . (B) deliberatezsecretjve (C) giggle:innocent (D) ragezimte _ (E) whisperz‘confldentjal PERORATION : SPEECH :: . (A) tempozmovement (B) figurezportrait (C) lightzshadow (D) verse: stanza (E) coda: sonata INTERREGNUM : GOVERNMENT 2: (A) splice:rope (B) cleavagezcrystal (C) infraction : law (D) frequencyzwave (E) hibemation2activity _ EMBROIDER : CLOTH :: (A) chasermetal (B) patchzquilt (C) gild: gold (D) carve '. knife ‘ ‘ (E) stainzglass ' GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. ,V--..._.,...,_. ‘ \ Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, Choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. Visual recognition involves storing and retrieving mem- ories. Neural activity, triggered by the eye, forms an image in the brain’s memory system that constitutes an internal representation of the viewed object. When an object is encountered again, it is matched with its inter- nal representation and thereby recognized. Controversy surrounds the question of whether recognition is a paral- lel, one-step process or a serial, step-by-step one. Psy- chologists of the Gestalt school maintain that objects are recognized as wholes in.a parallel procedure: the inter- nal representation is matched with the retinal image in a single operation. Other psychologists have proposed that internal representation features are matched serially with an object’s features. Although some experiments show that, as an object becomes familiar, its internal represen- tation becomes more holistic and the recognition process correspondingly more.parallel, the weight of evidence seems to support the serial hypothesis, at least for objects that are not notably simple and familiar. 17. The author is primarily concerned with (A) explaining how the brain receives images (B) synthesizing hypotheses of visual recognition (C) examining the evidence supporting the serial- recognition hypothesis (D) discussing visual recognition and some hypotheses proposed to explain it (E) reporting on recent experiments dealing with memory systems and their relationship to - .. neural activity 18. According to the passage, Gestalt psychologists make which of the following suppositions about visual recognition? I. I A retinal image is in exactly the same form as its ' internal representation. , II. Anobject is recognized as a whole without any need for analysis into component parts. III. The matching of an object with its internal representation occurs in only one step. (A) 11 only (B) In only ' (C) I and III only (D) II and III only (E) I, II, and III 653 19. It can be inferred from the passage that the match- ing process in visual recognition is (A) not a neural activity (B) not possible‘i'vhen an object is viewed for the very first time (C) not possible if a feature of a familiar object is changed in some way . (D) only possible when a retinal image is received ‘ in the brain as a unitary whole (E) now fully understood as a combination of the serial and parallel processes 20. In terms of its tone and form, the passage can best be characterized as (A) a biased exposition (B) a speculative study (C) a dispassionate presentation (D) an indignant denial ‘ (E) a dogmatic explanation GO ON To THE NEXT PAGE. In large part as a consequence of the feminist move- ment, historians haVe focused a great deal of attention in recent years on determining more accurately the status of women in various periods. Although much has been accomplished for the modern period, premodem cultures haveproved more difficult: sources are restricted in number, fragmentary, difficult to interpret, and often contradictory. Thus it is not particularly surprising that some earlier scholarship concerning such cultures has so far gone unchallenged. An example is Johann Bachofen’s l86l treatise on Amazons, women-ruled societies of questionable existence contemporary with ancient Greece. ’ Starting from the premise that mythology and legend preserve at least a nucleus of historical fact, Bachofen argued that women were dominant in many ancient soci- eties. His work was based on a comprehensive survey of references in the ancient sources to Amazonian and ‘ other societies with matrilineal customs—societies in which descent and property rights are traced through the female line. Some support for his theory can be found in evidence such as that drawn from Herodotus, the Greek “historian” of the fifth century,B.C., who speaks of an Amazonian society, the Sauromatae, where the women hunted and fought in wars. A woman inrthis society was not allowed to marry until she had killed a person in battle. . Nonetheless, this assumption that the first recorders of ancient myths have preserved facts is problematic. If one begins by examining why ancients refer to Amazons, it becomes clear that ancient Greek descriptions of such societies were meant not so much to represent observed historical fact—real Amazonian societies—but rather to offer “moral lessons" on the supposed outcome of women‘s rule in their own society. The Amazons were often characterized, for example, as the equivalents of giants and centaurs, enemies to be slain by Greek heroes. Their customs were presented not as those of a respect- able society, but as the very antitheses of ordinary Greek practices. Thus, I would argue, the purpose of accounts of the Amazons for their male Greek recorders was didactic, to teach both male and female Greeks that all-female groups, formed by withdrawal from traditional society, are destructive and dangerous. Myths about the Ama- zons were used as arguments for the male-dominated status quo. in which groups composed exclusively of either sex were not permitted to segregate themselves permanently from society. Bachofen was thus misled in his reliance on myths for information about the status of women. The sources that will probably tell contempo- rary historians most about women in the ancient world are such social documents as gravestones. wills, and man'iage contracts. Studies of such documents have already begun to show how mistaken we are when we try to derive our picture of the ancient world exclusively from literary sources. especially myths. 654 21. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) compare competing new approaches to under- standing the role of women in ancient soci- eties ' (B) investigate the ramifications of Bachofe'n’s the- ory about the dominance of women in ancient societies ' (C) explain the burgeoning interest among histori- ans in determining the actual status of women in various societies (D) analyze the nature of Amazonian society and uncover similarities between it and the Greek world (E) criticize the value of ancient myths in deter- mining the status of women in ancient soci- eties * 22. All of the following are stated by the author as problems connected with the sources for knowledge of premodem cultures EXCEPT (A) partial completeness (B) restricted accessibility (C) difficulty of interpretation‘ (D) limited quantity: . (E) tendency toward contradiction u 23. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage about the myths recorded by the ancient Greeks? I. They sometimes included portrayals of women holding positions of power. ll. They sometimes contained elaborate explana- tions ofinheritance customs. ' 111. They comprise almost all of the material avail— able to historians about ancient Greece. ' (A) Ionly (B) Ill only (C) land In only (D) II and III only (E) I. II, and Ill 00 ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 24. 25. Which of the following is presented in the passage as evidence supporting the author’s view of the ancient Greeks‘ descriptions of the Amazons? (A) The requirement that Sauromatae women kill in battle before marrying (B) The failure of historians to verify that women were ever governors of ancient societies (C) The classing of Amazons with giants and cen- taurs , (D) The well-established unreliability of Herodotus as a source of information about ancient societies (E) The recent discovery of ancient societies with matrilineal customs It can be inferred from the passage that the probable reactions of many males in ancient Greece to the idea of a society ruled by women could best be char- acterized as (A) confused and dismayed (B) wary and hostile (C) cynical and disinterested (D) curious but fearful (E) excited but anxious 655 26. 27. The author suggests that the main reasonfor the persisting influence of Bachofen‘s work is that (A) feminists have shown little interest in ancient societies ‘ (B) Bachofen‘s knowledge of Amazonian culture is unparalleled (C) reliable information about the ancient world is difficult to acquire (D) ancient societies show the best evidence of women in positions of power (E) historians have been primarily interested in the modern period The author’s attitude t0ward Bachofen’s treatise is best described as one of (A) qualified approval (B) profound ambivalence (C) studied neutrality (D) pointed disagreement (E) unmitigated hostility GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word 32. ABERRANT : (A) attractive (B) predictive printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words (C) blissful (D) normal (E) precise or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is ' L {nost nearly opposxte in meaning to the word in capital 33. OBDURATE I (A) flexible etters. . . . . V V (B) timid (C) retrospective Since some of the questions require you to distinguish (D) WhimSical (E) alienated fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 34. LIST : (A) be upside down (B) be upright (C) slide backward 28. COLLECT:(A) scatter (B) avoid (D) way” and f” (E) “° Ha" (C) hide (D) search (E) create 35. FORESTALL:(A) announce 'ii - (B) equivocate (C) prolong . z . t. . . ‘ 29 SERRATED (A) w1thou Jomts (D) preamth (E) steady (B) without folds (C) without notches (D) variegated (E) mutated _ 36. TENDENTIOUS:(A) unbiased (B) severely hampered (C) inapplicable 30' FLEDGLING’ (D) highly productive (E)-curved (A) experienced-practitioner (B) successful competitor - (C) reluctant volunteer 37. REDUNDANT:(A) consistent (D) recent convert (B) complex (C) diffuse (E) attentive listener (D) insighth (E) economical 31. SUPPOSITION: 38. RUE:(A) tenderness 2 (B) sincerity (A) certainty (C) heartiness (D) spite - (E) satisfaction (B) inferiority (C) irrelevance (D) unexpected occurrence (E) clear position 656 SECTION 2 Time —— 30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence bel0w has one or two blanks. each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that E fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. There are no solitary, free-living creatures; every form of life is --—-- other forms. (B) parallelvtc (D) Overshadowed by (A) segregated from (C) dependent on (E) mimicked by 2. The sale of Alaska was not so much an American coup as a matter of-——- for an imperial Russia that was short of cash and unable to its own continental coastline. (A) negligence. .fortify (B) custom. .maintain (C) convenience. .stabilize (D) expediency. .defend . I (E) ekigency. .reinforce 3. Despite assorted effusions to the contrary, there is no necessary link between scientific skill and human- : ism, and, quite possibly, there may be something of l a -——- between them. (B) fusion (C) congruity (E) reciprocity (A) generality (D) dichotomy 4. A common argument claims that in folk art, the artist’s subordination of technical mastery to intense feeling — the direct communication of emotion to the viewer. I (A) facilitates (B) averts (C) neutralizes (D) implies (E) represses 657 . In eighth-century Japan, people who . If duty is the natural 5. While not completely nonplussed by the unusually caustic responses from members of the audience, the speaker was nonetheless visibly by their lively cntimsm. (A) humiliated (B) discomfited (C) deluded (D) disgraced (E) tantalized waste- land were rewarded with official ranks as part of an effort to overcome the shortage of —-— fields. (A) conserved. .forested (B) reclaimed. .arable (C) cultivated. .domestic (D) irn'gated. .accessible (E) located. .desirable. ‘of one’s the course of future events, then people who are power- ful have duty placed on them whether they like it or not. (A) correlate. .understanding of (B) outgrowth. .control over (C) determinant. .involvement in (D) mitigant. preoccupation with (E) arbiter. .responsibility for GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE: ‘ x Directions: In each of the following questions, a related 12. INSECT ; BUTTERFLY : pair of words or phrases isfollowed by five lettered (A) perfume ; essence . pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that (B) botany : Chrysanthemum. best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in (C) philosophy : metaphysics the original pair. ' (D) pitch : black ‘ (E) color : brightness 3. COMA ; UNCONSCIOUSNESS :: 1 r ‘ (A) amnesia : effort 13. PERNTCIOUS : INJURE :: (B)' delirium : confusion (A) officious : deny (C) paralysis : pain (B) propitious : conjure (D) hallucination : numbness (C) audacious : allude (E) fever: calm - ' (D) avaricious : dispel (E) disingenuous : mislead 9. TOURNIQUET : BLOOD :: (A) bridge : river ' (B) antiseptic : surgery (C) dam 1 water 14. FLAG : VIGOR :: (A) endure : courage (D) Pressureiair (E) bUCkCIIWCII (B) tire:monotony_ (C) questionrpereeption (D) waver2resolution (E) flattergcharm 10. FOUNDATION 1 HOUSE :: ‘ (A) mountain : tunnel 15. EMBARRASS : MORTIFY :: (B) ground : sky ‘ (A) adumbrate : insinuate (C) net: trapeze - (B) indulge :- mollycoddle (D) pedestal : statue . (C) aggrandize : venerate (E) pole:banner_ ' (D) relent:deflate (E) upstage : demoralize 11. PHILATELIST : STAMPS :: ~ . (A) numismatist : coins l6. DISTILL : PURITY :: (B) astrologer:predictions (A) leavcnzvolume gepteticist :hrorrlnaoiomes piglvegze flt'lagility ca ograp :_ p a sor : ri 'ance (E) pawnbrplcerqewelry (D) homogenizezfluidity (E) conduct : charge GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 658 “rum-a ‘ \ Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage. choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. Initially the Vinaver. theory_ that Malory’s eight romances, once thought to be fundamentally unified, were in fact eight independent works produced both a sense of relief and an unpleasant shock. Vinaver’s the- ory comfortably explained away the apparent contra- dictions of chronology and made each romance inde- pendently satisfying. It was, however, disagreeable to find that what had been thought of as one book was now eight books. Part of this response was the natural reaction to the disturbance of set ideas. Nevertheless, even now, after lengthy consideration of the theory’s relined but legitimate observations, one cannot avoid the conclusion that the eight romances are only one work. It is not quite a matter of disagreeing with the theory of independence, but of rejecting its implica- tions: that the romances may be taken in any or no particular order, that they have no cumulative effect, and that they are as separate as the works of a modern novelist. l7. The primary purpose of the passage is to (A) discuss the validity of a hypothesis (B) summarize a system of general principles (C) propose guidelines for future argument (D) stipulate conditions for acceptance of an inter- pretation (E) deny accusations about an apparent contradic-, tion ’ ’ 18. It can be inferred from the passage that the author believes which of the following about Malory’s works? I I. There aremeaningful links between and among the romances. I II. The subtleties of the romances are obscured when they are taken as one work. III. Any contradictions in chronology among the romances are less important than their over- all unity. (A) Ionly (B) III- only (C) I and III only (D) II and III only (E) I, II, and III - r 659 19. The author of the passage concedes which of the 20. following about the Vinaver theory? (A) It gives a clearer understanding of the unity of Malory’s romances. (B) It demonstrates the irrationality of considering Malory’s romances to be unified. (C) It establishes acceptable links between Mal- ory’s romances and modern novels. (D) It unifies earlier and later theories concerning the chronology of Malory’s romances. (E) It makes valid and subtle comments about Malory,’s romances. It can be inferred from the passage that, in evaluat- mg the Vinaver theory, some critics were (A) frequently misled by the inconsistencies in Malory’s work (B) initially biased by previous interpretations of Malory‘s work (C) conceptually displeased by the general interpre- tation that Vinaver rejected (D) generally in agreement with Vinaver's compari- ‘ sons between Malory and modern novelists (E) originally skeptical about Vinaver’s early con- clusions with respect to modern novels TA... '00 ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. We can distinguish three diiTerent realms of matter, three levels on the quantum ladder. The first is the atomic realm, which includes the world of atoms, their interactions, and the structures that are formed by them, such as molecules, liquids and solids, and gases and plas- mas. This realm includes all the phenomena of atomic physics, chemistry, and, in a czrtain sense, biology. The energy exchanges taking place in this realm are of a rela- tively low order. If these exchanges are below one elec- tron volt, such as in the collisions between molecules of the air in a room, then atoms and molecules can be regarded as elementary particles. That is, they have “conditional elementarity" because they keep their iden- tity and do not change in any collisions or in other pro- eesses at these low energy exchanges. If one goes to higher energy exchanges, say 104 electron volts, then atoms and molecules will decompose into nuclei and electrons; 'at this level, the latter particlesmust be consid- ered as elementary. We find examples of structures and processes of this first rung of the quantum ladder on Earth, on planets, and on the surfaces of stars. The next rung is the nuclear realm. Here the energy exchanges are much higher, on the order of millions of electron volts. As long as we are dealing with phenom- ena in the atomic realm, such arnOunts of energy are unavailable, and most nuclei are inert: they'do not change. However, if one applies energies of millions of electron volts, nuclear reactions, fission and fusion, and the processes of radioactivity occur; our elementary par- ticles then are protons, neutrons, and electrons. In addi- tion, nuclear processes producz neutrinos, particles that have no detectable mass or charge. In the universe, ener- gies at this level are available in the centers of stars and in star explosions. Indeed, the energy radiated by the stars is produced by nuclear reactions. The natural 660 radioactivity we find on Earth is the long-lived remnant of the time when now-earthly matter was expelled into space by a major stellar explosion.» The third rung of the quantum ladder is the subnu- clear realm. Here we are dealing with energy exchanges of many billions of electron volts. We encounter excited nucleons, new types of particles such as mesons, heavy electrons, quarks, and gluons, and also antimatterin large quantities. The gluons are the quanta, or smallest units, of the force (the strong force) that keeps the quarks together. As long as we are dealing with the atomic or nuclear realm, these new types of particles do not occur and the nucleons remain inert. But at subnu- clear energy levels, the nucleons and mesons appear to be composed of quarks, so that the quarks and gluons figure as elementary particles. 21. The primaryitopic of the passage is which of the following? (A) The interaction of the realms on the quantum ladder » i (B) Atomic structures found on Earth, on other planets, and on the surfaces of stars (C) Levels of energy that‘are released in nuclear ‘ reactions on Earth and in stars (D) Particles and processes found in the atomic,_ nuclear, and subnuclear realms (E) New types of particles occurring in the atomic realm ’ _ GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 22. 24. According to the passage, radioactivity that occurs naturally on Earth is the result of (A) the production of particles that have no detectable mass or electric charge (B) high energy exchanges on the nuclear level that occurred in an ancient explosion in a star (C) processes that occur in the center of the Sun. which emits radiation to the Earth (D) phenomena in the atomic realm that cause atoms and molecules to decompOSe into nuclei and electrons (E) high-voltage discharges of electricity that took place in the atmosphere of the Earth shortly after the Earth was formed . The author organizes the passage by (A) making distinctions between two groups of par- ticles, those that are elementary and those that are composite ' (B) explaining three methods of transferring energy to atoms and to the smaller particles that constitute atoms (C) describing several levels of processes, increasing in energy, and corresponding sets of particles, generally decreasing in size I (D) putting forth an argument concerning energy levels and then conceding that several qualifi- cations of that argument are necessary (E) making several successive refinements of a defi- nition of elementarity on the basis of several groups of experimental results According to the passage, which of the fOIIOWing can be found in the atomic realm? (A) More than one level of energy exchange ' (B) Exactly one elementary particle (C) Exactly three kinds of atomic structures (D) Three levels on the quantum ladder (E) No particles smaller than atoms 661 25. 26. 27. ( \ According to the author, gluons are not (A) considered to be detectable (B) produced in nuclear reactions (C) encountered in subnuclear energy exchanges (D) related to the strong force (E) found to be conditionally elementary At a higher energy level than the subnuclear level described, if such a higher level exists, it can be expected on the basis of the information in the pas- sage that there would probably be (A) excited nucleons (B) elementary mesons (C) a kind of particle without detectable mass or charge - (D) exchanges of energy on the order of millions of electron volts ' (E) another set of elementary particles The passage speaks of particles as having condi— tional elementarity if they ‘ _(A) remain unchanged at a given level of energy exchange (B) cannot be decompOSed into smaller'conj ‘ stituents . (C) are mathematically simpler than some other set of particles (D) release energy at a low level in collisions. (E) belong to the nuclear level on the quantum lad- der GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word 33. ABATE: (A) attach (l3) alter printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words (C) absent (D) assist (E) augment or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is ' . Snearly opfisrte in meaning to the word in capital 34' DOFF: (A) rm (B) don (C) ply ' . (D) clasp tightly (E) hide carefully Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the 35. ERUDITE: (A) unsettled choices before deciding which one is best. (B) unfettered (C) untalented (D) untitled (E) unlettered 28. PARTITION: (A) unify (B) mollify (C) nullify (D) indemnify (E) fortify 36. GARRULITY: (A) servility (B) forbearance (C) peacefulness , 29. ABHOR: (A) greatly admire (D) “0mm” ' (E) tadmmity (B) promise absolutely (C) inspire (D) credit (E) improve ' 37. SCOTCH: (A) entrust (B) emphasiZe (C) encourage (D) renovate 3o. TAINTED: (A) available (B) strident 05) “mm (C) conspicuous (D) wholesome (E) insensible 38. LIBERTINE: (A) serf (B) miser (C), prisoner (D) ascetic 31. CARDINAL: (A) abstract (B) elusive (E) aumofimfim (C) subtle (D) minor (E) miniature 32. ESTRANGEMENT: ' (A) reconciliation (B) dissemblance ’ '1‘ (C) consolation (D) chaotic situation (E) continuous negotiation >662 x FOR GENERAL TEST 17 ONLY‘ Answer Key and Percentages‘ cl Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly QUANTITATIVE ABILITY ANALYTICAL ABILITY VEHBAL ABILITY Sutton 1 Section 2 Section 5 5mm. 5 Numuer Answer Number Answer Numtm Answer 1 Answer : Numuer Ansvm' Number Answer C C B A E A D C A A C D C B 5 a A D C A E B A A O C B B c A C B C E E C B B D C A C C B B E D A D E 11 B 77 11 A A E D 12 A I 45 ‘ 1 c a 5 A 13 o 55 ‘ 13 E o E a 14 E 21 14 D A A D 15 E ; 17 15 8 22 D c a 16 A ‘ 9 16 A 27 A o c 17 D ‘ 79 17 A 44 E A E 18 D 43 18 C 51 B c A 19 B 58 19 E 25 D D D 20 C 36 20 B 38 C E D E 64 21 D 64 3 8 D B 53 22 . B 69 B D C A 59 23 C 72 D a C C 53 24 A 40 C C a B . 70 25 B 42 C E C C 53 26 E 49 B D 75 27 A _58 C A 94 26 A 91 D C 71 29 A 86 A A 66 30 D 83 E A 60 31 D 73 D 43 32 A 73 A 45 33 E 46 B 45 34 8 50 D 39 35 E 25 A E E C E D 'Estimamd P+ for the group at examinees who took the GRE General Test in a recent three-year period. 689 ...
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Bigbook_17 - TEST 17 SECTION 1 Time —- 30 minutes 38...

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